Article

Exploring the Views of Individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on the Use of Rollators: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

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Abstract

Purpose: Although it has been well documented that the progressive exercise limitation associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can be helped with an assistive device, such as a rollator, many individuals use it infrequently. This study seeks to explore the views of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease regarding the use of rollators. Methods: A qualitative study design was used. Twelve individuals with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were recruited from an outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program to participate in semistructured interviews. Inductive thematic analysis was applied. Results: Analysis revealed 5 themes: (1) "acquiring a rollator" reflecting the process of obtaining a device either via a health care professional or self-referral; (2) "acceptance versus resistance" describing opposing views regarding rollator usage; (3) "rollator roadblocks" describing practical barriers to use; (4) "participation" reflecting how rollators can promote reintegration into society; and (5) "revising perceptions" whereby participants embodied an eventual acceptance of rollators. Conclusion: Rollator acquisition appeared to be a unilateral, prescriptive process. Individuals described initial resistance to use, although in the long-term, negative perceptions were outweighed by the functional and social benefits of rollator use. Encouraging users to participate in deciding whether to use a rollator and providing adequate education on its indications, benefits, barriers, and facilitators are likely to promote optimal use of a rollator.

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... Aspects relating to the physical shape, size and weight of a device were also identified by users as a barrier to using their assistive technology. Examples identified included the assistive technology being too big for the user to carry or too heavy to use [51,54,56,57,64,65,67,69,73,77,[80][81][82]. The aesthetics of a device were also discussed by some users as a barrier to using their assistive technology. ...
... A lack of involvement in care decisions and assistive technology choice was another barrier to the use of assistive technology. Users wanted individual choice in the equipment being provided to them and a lack of involvement resulted in frustration and disagreement with the prescriber [50][51][52]54,60,64,66,69,70,75,78,80,[82][83][84]. Failure to account for individualized care needs showed users wanted to be treated on an individual basis and not feel like they were being categorized (due to their health condition). ...
... A negative attitude towards using technology and assistive technology by the end user was a barrier to using assistive technology. When the end user was against the idea of using technology due to it being perceived as annoying, awkward or not appropriate for them, the personal attitude of the individual influenced the use of the assistive technology [50][51][52][53][55][56][57][58][59]61,63,67,70,76,77,82,84,85]. The end user's attitudes towards their health condition relates to the end user's need to accept their current health condition and the need for help before they are willing to use assistive technology. ...
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