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Fostering Maritime Education Through Interdisciplinary Training

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The nature and complexity of the challenges faced in today's world are forcing a greater number of specialised individuals to collaborate together, in order to produce a joint effort combining their expertise. Based on this observation that the professional world is interdisciplinary, the learning and teaching provided in Higher Education should adapt and consider interdisciplinary approaches to subjects in order to help develop key employability skills for working in interdisciplinary teams. Building on the perceived benefits of interdisciplinary education, an academic exchange between boatbuilding and yacht design students has been conducted to investigate an interdisciplinary pedagogical model aimed at the maritime industry. The finding reveals clear learning outcomes, revolving around the learning experience, the reflection generated, and the enhanced capabilities; respectively supporting their studies, contributing to bridging the skills gap and enhancing employability, thereby offering a contribution to meeting the contemporary demands from both students and the maritime industry.
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As the challenges faced in today's world are increasingly complex, a large number of specialised individuals now need to collaborate together to combine their expertise. Since the professional world is interdisciplinary, the learning and teaching provided in higher education must adapt and consider the interdisciplinary approach, very clearly encouraged in the United Kingdom by both the Higher Education Academy and the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills. Building on the known benefits of interdisciplinary education, an academic exchange between boatbuilding and yacht design students has been conducted to develop and support an interdisciplinary learning pedagogical model. Primarily focussed on the maritime field, the proposed model has three bases, learning, reflection and capabilities, respectively supporting studies, bridging the skills gap and enhancing employability, thereby answering the contemporary demands from both students and the maritime industry.
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