ChapterPDF Available

Idoneidad ambiental de las tortugas marinas en el Golfo de México: visión futura en un océano más caliente

Authors:
... We defined our study area as the reported geographic distribution of hawksbill and green sea turtles in the Mexican waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, an area that includes the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mexico and small portions of other territories (Fig. 1). This study area also contained the habitat suitability range for both species described by Uribe-Martínez et al. (2017), which describe the geographic range of these species in this region. Both geographic ranges are included in the Atlantic−Western Caribbean and Atlantic−Northwest regional management units for hawksbill and green turtles, respectively (Wallace et al. 2010). ...
... These species have benthic feeding habits so it was expected to find them in areas on the continental shelf (Spotila 2004). As Uribe-Martínez et al. (2017) reported, both hawksbills and green turtles widely use the continental shelf in the southern Gulf of Mexico throughout their entire life cycle, as it contains the critical habitats they require throughout their life. ...
... In the case of the increasing average SST, climatic variables can affect the phenology, distribution range, trophic status and nesting seasons of sea turtles around the world (Broderick et al. 2001, James et al. 2006, Patel et al. 2016. Uribe-Martínez et al. (2017) showed that an increase in SST would modify the spatial configuration of suitable habitat for Chelonia mydas and Eretmochelys imbricata in the southern Gulf of Mexico, so important consideration in this region should be given to the threat of increased SST to sea turtle aggregations. Micheli et al. (2013) identified oceanic environment variables as major threats for marine ecosystems, assuming the potential impacts of variables such as pH decreases, as well as SST and UV increases. ...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in ecological attributes as a result of anthropogenic activities and climatic forces can jeopardize biodiversity, so these potential impacts must be evaluated for conservation. Integrating the different components of a large ecosystem can, however, pose a methodological challenge. When evaluating the sensitivity of a system, the level of stress imposed by a threat and the system’s ability to deal with pressures ultimately define its actual condition. The objective of this study was to assemble a spatially explicit quantitative approach for evaluating the ecological vulnerability of 2 sea turtle species (Eretmochelys imbricata and Chelonia mydas). We used a method that combined the use of an open source planning tool (Conservation Action Planning) and spatial multicriteria analysis to determine the total cumulative ecological vulnerability to multiple threats for each species individually and for both species combined. The spatially explicit outputs were supported by hard data and expert knowledge, including the cumulative ecological vulnerability of each species to multiple threats. For each species, we identified areas in the Gulf of Mexico where individual threats have a potential impact and also determined high vulnerability locations. This spatially explicit approach is important when assessing ecological vulnerability and risk, it is versatile and easily reproducible for other organisms, and can be an important tool in supporting the conservation and management of endangered species.
Article
Full-text available
Marine turtles are globally endangered species that spend more than 95% of their life cycle in in-water habitats. Nevertheless, most of the conservation, recovery and research efforts have targeted the on-land habitats, due to their easier access, where adult females lay their eggs. Targeting the large knowledge gaps on the in-water critical habitats of turtles, particularly in the Large Marine Ecosystem Gulf of Mexico, is crucial for their conservation and recovery in the long term. We used satellite telemetry to track 85 nesting females from their beaches after they nested to identify their feeding and residency habitats, their migratory corridors and to describe the context for those areas. We delimited major migratory corridors in the southern Gulf of Mexico and West Caribbean and described physical features of internesting and feeding home ranges located mainly around the Yucatan Peninsula and Veracruz, Mexico. We also contributed by describing general aggregation and movement patterns for the four marine turtle species in the Atlantic, expanding the knowledge of the studied species. Several tracked individuals emigrated from the Gulf of Mexico to as far as Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Bahamas. This information is critical for identifying gaps in marine protection and for deciphering the spatial connectivity in large ocean basins, and it provides an opportunity to assess potential impacts on marine turtle populations and their habitats.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.