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NICKEL(II) COMPLEXES WITH ‘NON INNOCENT’ LIGANDS – CYCLOAMINOMETHYL DERIVATIVES OF 1,2-DIHYDROXYBENZENE: SOD-LIKE AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY

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... Ni(II) complexes with 3-(X-1-ylmethyl)-5tritylbenzene-1,2-diol (HL I -HL V ) and 2-(Х-1ylmethyl)-4,6-di-tert-bytulbenzene-1,3-diol (HL VI -HL X ) were X is pyrrolidin (HL I , HL VI ), piperidin (HL II , HL VII ), azepan (HL III , HL VIII ), morpholinomethyl (HL IV , HL IX ), 4-methylpiperazin (HL V , HL X ) were synthesized according to [14]. ...
Article
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