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Health complication caused by protein deficiency

Authors:
  • University of the Punajb
  • MY University

Abstract

Human body need to consume the sufficient amount of protein on daily basis. Lacking of sufficient intake of protein may cause many health complications. This short review aimed to assess the perceptions of various researchers available in the shape of literature about the health complications caused by low intake of protein. Based on available literature the researcher arrived at conclusion that insufficient of protein may cause various health problems such as kwashiorkor, marasmus, impaired mental health, edema, organ failure, wasting and shrinkage of muscle tissues, and weakness of immune system
J Food Sci Nutr 2017 Volume 1 Issue 1
1
http://www.alliedacademies.org/journal-food-science-nutrition/Editorial
Protein Deciency
According to Rosendaal protein deciency is a disorder of
blood coagulating. The individual with the protein deciency
are at high risk of developing abnormal blood coagulation [1].
The person with moderate protein deciency is at risk of deep
vein thrombosis which occurs in deep veins of extremities [2].
Health Complication Caused by Protein
Deciency
Protein is a macronutrient that is basic for the development,
upkeep and repair of all your body's cells. Body can't make
due without this supplement [3]. Neglecting to devour enough
protein can have various negative symptoms and eventually
prompts demise. The author further stated the following health
complications caused by low intake of protein.
Kwashiorkor
Kwashiorkor is a sort of protein inadequacy that inuences
youngsters. It has various manifestations which incorporate an
extended liver, a swollen midriff, pedal oedema (swollen feet),
skin depigmentation, skin aggravation, diminishing hair and
tooth misfortune. At last, it can repress a youngster's mental and
physical advancement.
Marasmus
Marasmus is a kind of protein inadequacy that can prompt
weakness, muscle squandering, and lessened muscle versus
fat levels, decreased vitality levels and weight reduction.
It additionally diminishes the viability of the invulnerable
framework and makes sufferers more helpless to infections.
Impaired mental health
Long term protein inadequacy can inuence your psychological
well-being in various ways. It can prompt mental hindrance
(especially in youngsters) and furthermore cause tension,
surliness, sorrow and crankiness.
Oedema
Not getting enough protein can prompt oedema (liquid
maintenance). This can cause swelling in various zones of the
body, for example, the feet, hands and stomach. Aside from the
swelling oedema can likewise cause hurting in the appendages,
stained skin, hypertension and solid joints.
Organ failure
Protein is required for the growth and maintenance of various
body function. Deciency of protein can cause the improper
function of different body organs.
Wasting and shrinkage of muscle tissues
When you don't get enough protein in your eating regimen
your body begins to source it from somewhere else. One of the
primary sources your body swings to is the muscles. On the off
chance that your body takes protein from the muscles it makes
them wasting and shrinkage.
Weak immune system
Protein is basic for the creation of antibodies which are a key
piece of the safe framework. On the off chance that you wind up
plainly inadequate in protein your body will be not able produce
these antibodies. This makes you more defenseless to disease as
your body will battle to battle remote items.
Conclusion
Based on available literature the researcher arrived at conclusion
that insufcient of protein may cause various health problems
such as kwashiorkor, marasmus, impaired mental health,
edema, organ failure, wasting and shrinkage of muscle tissues,
and weakness of immune system.
References
1. Rosendaal FR. Venous thrombosis: A multicausal disease.
The Lancet. 1999;3:1167-1173.
2. Saber AA, Aboolian A, LaRaja R, et al. HIV/AIDS and
the risk of deep vein thrombosis: A study of 45 patients
Human body need to consume the sufcient amount of protein on daily basis. Lacking of
sufcient intake of protein may cause many health complications. This short review aimed to
assess the perceptions of various researchers available in the shape of literature about the health
complications caused by low intake of protein. Based on available literature the researcher
arrived at conclusion that insufcient of protein may cause various health problems such as
kwashiorkor, marasmus, impaired mental health, edema, organ failure, wasting and shrinkage
of muscle tissues, and weakness of immune system.
Abstract
Health complication caused by protein deciency.
Alamgir Khan1*, Salahuddin Khan1, Aftab Ahmad Jan2, Manzoor Khan3
1Department of Sports Science & Physical Education, Gomal University, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, Pakistan
2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Gomal University, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, Pakistan
3Hazara University Manshera, Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, Pakistan
Accepted on October 04, 2017
2
Citation: Khan A, Khan S, Jan AA, et al. Health complication caused by protein deciency. J Food Sci Nutr. 2017;1(1):1-2.
J Food Sci Nutr 2017 Volume 1 Issue 1
with lower extremity involvement. The American Surgeon.
2001;67(7):645-647.
3. Shryer D. Body fuel: A Guide to Good Nutrition. Singapore:
Marshall Cavendish. 2007.
*Correspondence to:
Alamgir Khan
Department of Sports Science & Physical Education
Gomal University
Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa
Pakistan
Tel: 03329741015
E-mail: alamgir1989@hotmail.com
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Issue 1 with lower extremity involvement
J Food Sci Nutr 2017 Volume 1 Issue 1 with lower extremity involvement. The American Surgeon. 2001;67(7):645-647.
Body fuel: A Guide to Good Nutrition. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish
  • D Shryer
Shryer D. Body fuel: A Guide to Good Nutrition. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish. 2007.