ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

Background: Midwifery education plays a vital role in developing the midwives. The education has so far created best qualified midwife graduates. The demand for enhanced education of midwives is convinced. Methods: From November 2013 until July 2014, a qualitative research utilizing in-depth interviews and focus group deliberations were conducted. In Indonesia, the compilation of data included 26 interviewers from 12 provinces. 367 participants were chosen for Indepth interviews concerning the stakeholders, midwives, and consumers of midwife service. The strategies for in-depth interviews involved the determination of midwife facilities, midwife competences, and expectancies towards midwifery education. Data validation and members check is conducted to corroborate the precision of the data in this research. Results: The assessment enclosed existing midwife facilities and midwife competences. The expectancies emphasize the input-process-output in midwifery concepts. This also included the human resources, midwifery education curriculum, assortment structure of student intake, facilities, and least average of midwifery education. The procedure should envelop teaching and practicum, learning development, assistance, investigation and evaluation. The incorporation of input and procedure must create midwifery capabilities, soft skills, and improved midwife services. Conclusion: The significance of the character of education in produce professional midwife graduates. Therefore, improvements quality of educational is needed to meet a demand of job market needs. © 2017 South India Medico-Legal Association. All rights reserved.
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
Article
Background: With a diversity in midwifery education across the South-East Asia region, and with the knowledge about the lifesaving competency of the midwife profession, this study's aim is to describe facilitators of and barriers to providing high-quality midwifery education in South-East Asia. Methods: Inspired by Whittemore and Knafl, we conducted a systematic integrative literature review including the five key stages of problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis, and presentation of results. The literature searches were conducted in October 2020 in the databases CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. A deductive data analysis based on global standards was performed. Results: The search identified 1257 articles, 34 of which were included. Countries in South-East Asia did not fully comply with the ICM global standards. Midwifery education was not separated from that of nursing, and educators lacked formal qualifications in midwifery. Curriculum implementation in the clinical area was a key barrier to achieving learning outcomes. Higher academic education for midwifery educators and mentorship programs facilitated the pedagogic and assessment process, focusing on the abilities of critical thinking, reflection, and decision-making. Conclusions: Countries in South-East Asia still have a long way to go before they can provide high-quality midwifery education. The identified facilitators can lead to a difference in students' academic achievement and confidence in their clinical work. Coordinated actions will enable the progress in achieving competent midwives matching national health priorities. The findings highlight a need for more research on midwifery education in both theory and practice across the region.
Article
Full-text available
Women at low risk of pregnancy complications benefit from continuity of midwifery care, but no trial evidence exists for women with identified risk factors. We aimed to assess the clinical and cost outcomes of caseload midwifery care for women irrespective of risk factors. In this unblinded, randomised, controlled, parallel-group trial, pregnant women at two metropolitan teaching hospitals in Australia were randomly assigned to either caseload midwifery care or standard maternity care by a telephone-based computer randomisation service. Women aged 18 years and older were eligible if they were less than 24 weeks pregnant at the first booking visit. Those who booked with another care provider, had a multiple pregnancy, or planned to have an elective caesarean section were excluded. Women allocated to caseload care received antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care from a named caseload midwife (or back-up caseload midwife). Controls received standard care with rostered midwives in discrete wards or clinics. The participant and the clinician were not masked to assignment. The main primary outcome was the proportion of women who had a caesarean section. The other primary maternal outcomes were the proportions who had an instrumental or unassisted vaginal birth, and the proportion who had epidural analgesia during labour. Primary neonatal outcomes were Apgar scores, preterm birth, and admission to neonatal intensive care. We analysed all outcomes by intention to treat. The trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12609000349246. Publicly insured women were screened at the participating hospitals between Dec 8, 2008, and May 31, 2011. 1748 pregnant women were randomly assigned, 871 to caseload and 877 to standard care. The proportion of caesarean sections did not differ between the groups (183 [21%] in the caseload group vs 204 [23%] in the standard care group; odds ratio [OR] 0·88, 95% CI 0·70-1·10; p=0·26). The proportion of women who had elective caesarean sections (before onset of labour) differed significantly between caseload and standard care (69 [8%] vs 94 [11%]; OR 0·72, 95% CI 0·52-0·99; p=0·05). Proportions of instrumental birth were similar (172 [20%] vs 171 [19%]; p=0·90), as were the proportions of unassisted vaginal births (487 [56%] vs 454 [52%]; p=0·08) and epidural use (314 [36%] vs 304 [35%]; p=0·54). Neonatal outcomes did not differ between the groups. Total cost of care per woman was AUS$566·74 (95% 106·17-1027·30; p=0·02) less for caseload midwifery than for standard maternity care. Our results show that for women of any risk, caseload midwifery is safe and cost effective. National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia).
Article
Full-text available
Curricula related to practical professions essentially offer a set of 'instructions' for understanding what a professional should do and how professional identity is constituted. Such curricula build on academic understandings, professional requirements and employability con- siderations. Qualifications in the practical professions need to address fitness for award (what the educational establishment wants), fitness for practice (what the professional body wants), and fitness for purpose (what the employers want). Changes in professional education usually betoken a rebalancing between these three points when one is thought to have become privileged and is producing 'unbalanced' professionals. 'Unbalanced' may be understood in a number of ways, for example, as too academic or not academic enough', as privileging soft skills or privileging hard skills, as privileging professional bodies to the exclusion of other constituencies. Looking at just one small part of this triangle and using the exemplar of the status of 'soft' or generic skills we examine the shifting sands of practice identity as constructed through professional education. Our paper takes the form of a conversation between engineering and nursing using the ways in which soft skills in both professions have historically been viewed in educational, employment and pro- fessional terms. We will examine a variety of literature including governmental materials on em- ployability and skills, professional body materials on standards and university curricula in order to begin to formulate some ideas about what the various constituencies of employers, professional bodies and HE institutions see as the process of practice based education and consequent profes- sional identity.
Article
Full-text available
This paper undertakes a case study of a business school within a leading university in the Middle East, which has implemented a quality system and has gained accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International. The paper reviews the development of the quality system and examines the concept of service quality in business education. The aim of this study is to address the paucity of service quality research in business education in this region. Empirical research is used to determine the factors that influence student evaluation of service quality. With data collected from 310 students, the study identifies six factors that influence students’ evaluations of service quality. Research implications of the study are then discussed.
Article
In the 1970s, advocates of demedicalising pregnancy and birth ‘discovered’ Dutch maternity care. The Netherlands presented an attractive model because its maternity care system was characterised by a strong and independent profession of midwifery, close co-operation between obstetricians and midwives, a very high rate of births at home, little use of caesarean section, and morbidity and mortality statistics that were among the best in the developed world. Over the course of the following 40 years much has changed in the Netherlands. Although the home birth rate remains quite high when compared to other modern countries, it is half of what it was in the 1970s. Midwifery is still an independent medical profession, but a move toward ‘integrated care’ threatens to bring midwives into hospitals under the direction of medical specialists, more women are interested in medical pain relief, and there is a growing concern that current, albeit slight, increases in rates of intervention in physiological bi
Article
This paper aims to point out that the world-wide education reforms for education quality are experiencing three waves based on different paradigms and theories of education quality and school effectiveness, and they result in different strategies and approaches to education assurance. The first wave of school reforms and initiatives focuses mainly on internal quality assurance and makes an effort to improve internal school performance, particularly the methods and processes of teaching and learning. The second wave emphasizes interface quality assurance in terms of organizational effectiveness, stakeholders’ satisfaction and market competitiveness and makes an effort to ensure satisfaction and accountability to the internal and external stakeholders. The coming improvement initiatives should be moving towards the third wave, which emphasizes strongly future quality assurance in terms of relevance to the new paradigm of education concerning contextualized multiple intelligences (CMI), globalization, localization and individualization.
Purpose – To discuss the requirement for a university to adopt a clearly defined marketing strategy to increase its international student population and generate additional revenue. Design/methodology/approach – Primary research was undertaken to investigate the notion that customer satisfaction influences perceived quality and in turn affects profitability. The research methodology carried out among hospitality and tourism management students at Bournemouth University combined qualitative and quantitative methods. A student focus group and staff members with specialised knowledge were interviewed using a semi-structured approach to allow a pre-determined core of open-ended questions to be addressed, while enabling other related issues to be pursued. Findings – Within Bournemouth University, the reputation of the hospitality and tourism programmes and educational links are the most important considerations in student decision making, regarding their choice of programme and place of study. Research limitations/implications – It could be argued that the courses selected attract more outgoing individuals and those more prepared to adapt to change and adopt a different culture. However, the students were from a range of countries and were representative of the mix at the University. Practical implications – In an increasingly competitive market for international students, institutions need to provide an optimum service. International education marketing to international students should be managed to enhance consumer satisfaction, and raise perceived quality. Originality/value – The findings should be taken into account when programmes are revalidated to ensure that these disciplines continue to provide students with the knowledge required by a global industry.
Article
Midwifery education in the UK has been delivered through the University sector since the mid-1990s, with the requirement to create safe, effective clinicians who are equipped to engage with research and evidence based practice. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of focus group data from 120 senior midwifery students at six British universities to explore the experience of learning to be a midwife. Thematic analysis of the data suggests the following themes pertain to the experience of a number of students: 'teach yourself midwifery', knowing it all, right way of doing things, the importance of physical skills. These themes suggest a dissonance for some students between the andragogical methods of learning espoused by universities, and the expectations of students, who express the belief that there is a fixed and finite body of knowledge, without which they feel disempowered, anxious and ill-prepared for clinical practice. This paper argues that there are unresolved tensions between the perceived demands of practice environments and regulatory bodies and the philosophical stance of universities. For some students the concept of a broad discursive education is a distraction from training in discrete clinical skills.