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The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) Project Technical Paper 12: The Final Report - Effective Pre-School Education

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... Higher levels of parental involvement in their child's school are positively associated with academic achievement (Fan & Chen, 2001;Hill & Craft, 2003;Zellman & Waterman, 1998). Studies have shown that parental involvement in the school was also positively associated with the exhibition of other indicators of student success including higher self-regulation, work adaptation, and higher ambition (Afolabi, 2014;Van Velsor & Orozco, 2007). ...
... The earlier a parent becomes involved in school, the more likely they are to commit to their child's education in the future (Sylva et al., 2004). However, parent involvement is impacted by many factors and a variety of barriers impede parents' involvement in schools. ...
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Researchers show that family involvement is crucial to a student’s success, yet finding ways to engage parents in the postsecondary planning process is sometimes challenging for school counselors. This case study highlights one school district’s process of developing and implementing a program geared toward engaging parents in their students’ postsecondary planning process. We discuss the rationale, steps taken to incorporate multiple stakeholders and data throughout the planning process, and attendee feedback.
... eir engagement is manifested in simple everyday activities with their children. For example, when children are small, they read to them, or with them, or take them to the library; they sing nursery rhymes, draw and paint together, and they may invite their children's friends over to play [21]. ese parents' engagement reflects high levels of agency [22], as they communicate clearly with their children and explain the reasons behind their actions [4]. ...
... ese parents' engagement reflects high levels of agency [22], as they communicate clearly with their children and explain the reasons behind their actions [4]. ey build a positive and structured home learning environment, for example, by ensuring that their children have a suitable space to read and complete schoolwork [21]. ese parents keep themselves informed about their children's coursework from primary through to secondary school [4,12,23]. ...
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Parental engagement is a central aspect of children’s holistic education, i.e., schooling-related and nonschooling-related learning. Parents’ role in supporting such integrative learning is increasingly necessary to develop students’ social, emotional, and intellectual skills. Nonetheless, it remains unclear which parental practices support holistic learning. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to identify and describe the current practices of engagement with learning of four exemplar parents in Finland (N = 2) and Portugal (N = 2). These four parents of primary-school-age children were individually interviewed, and abductive content analysis was performed to analyze their narratives. Our results evidence four patterns of exemplar practices: showing active interest in the child, supporting autonomy, building a partnership with the teacher and the school, and visiting the child’s school. The study concludes that even though exemplar parents use a variety of specific engagement practices, they support holistic learning through their ownership of action in such interactions, clear awareness about their parental role, and consistency in their intentions. Exemplar parental engagement within different cultural contexts was discussed. Recommendations for teachers’ pedagogy are presented regarding the benefits of digital communication, goal-oriented invitations to school, and promotion of family time in the home for enhancing children’s holistic learning.
... Additionally, the pre-test data of this study showed that the quality of micro-and macro-adaptive learning support was predicted by country, but not by professional training (Meier-Wyder et al. 2022). The findings of other studies on the impact of training are inconclusive: The EPPE study (Sylva et al. 2004) indicated that a higher level of training has an impact on instructional quality in preschool institutions. However, a case study by Kucharz et al. (2014) found that this was not a very strong effect. ...
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Adaptive learning support is a key element of high quality preschool education and includes the planning of learning situations and teacher-child interactions. The provision of effective adaptive learning support in kindergarten is challenging. This longitudinal experimental study examined the impact of two professional development programs on 132 kindergarten teachers. One program focused on teacher-child interactions (micro-adaptive learning support), the other on planning, preparation, and reflection (macro-adaptive learning support). Each program had a positive impact on the quality of the specific type of adaptive mathematical learning support provided by kindergarten teachers, macro or micro, it was designed to improve.
... Die Relevanz der häuslichen Lernumwelt sowie die Qualität elterlicher Interaktionen für die kindliche Entwicklung sind vielfach belegt (Linberg et al. 2020;Melhuish et al. 2008;Vallotton et al. 2017). Auch die Qualität der Kindertageseinrichtungen beeinflusst die kindliche Entwicklung maßgeblich (Anders et al. 2013;Roux und Tietze 2007;Sylva et al. 2004). ...
Article
Zusammenfassung Untersuchungen haben gezeigt, dass die Fähigkeit zur genauen Einschätzung von Personenmerkmalen sehr unterschiedlich ausgeprägt sein kann. Insbesondere im Vorschulbereich sind adäquate Einschätzungen von Kompetenzen wichtig, da die frühe Bildung Grundstein für die weitere Entwicklung von Kindern darstellt. In unserem Beitrag gehen wir deshalb auf Basis von Daten der Startkohorte 2 des Nationalen Bildungspanels (NEPS) der Frage nach, wie Eltern und pädagogische Fachkräfte in Kindertageseinrichtungen die Kompetenzen von Kindern einschätzen. Es zeigt sich, dass sowohl Eltern als auch pädagogische Fachkräfte die sprachlichen und mathematischen Kompetenzen der Kinder überschätzen, wobei die Elterneinschätzungen deutlicher vom objektiv erhobenen Maß abweichen. Weiterhin weisen unsere Befunde zum einen darauf hin, dass die Eltern Kompetenzunterschiede zwischen Kindern mit unterschiedlichen Merkmalen für den Bereich Sprache erkennen, während dies für den Bereich Mathematik weniger gelingt. Zum anderen nehmen die pädagogischen Fachkräfte den Zusammenhang zwischen Kompetenzen und Geschlecht und Alter korrekt wahr, während sie herkunftsbedingte Unterschiede je nach Kompetenz über- oder unterschätzen. Open Access: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11618-022-01088-x
Chapter
Der Beitrag beschreibt das Verhältnis von Kindertageseinrichtungen und Familie in der Triade Familie, Kindertageseinrichtung und Schule. Das Verhältnis unterliegt historisch steten Neuaushandlungen und konstituiert sich im Ringen um eine Institutionalisierung von Betreuungsangeboten vor dem Hintergrund wohlfahrtsstaatlicher Regulierungen und marktwirtschaftlicher Interessen. Dabei wird das Konzept der Erziehungspartnerschaft als Anspruch, Ziel und Herausforderung für pädagogische Praxis und als gegenwärtiger Ausdruck einer spezifischen programmatischen Verhältnisbestimmung zwischen Familie und Kindertageseinrichtungen betrachtet.
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This commentary paper offers a broader definition of the construct of the home learning envi- ronment and an updated conceptual framework. Recent empirical research has burgeoned on the home learning environment and is mainly examining how processes mediate the way parenting practices influence a child’s development and learning. By introducing the Home Learning Eco- system, the paper presents a holistic view of the different home learning environment components and focuses on the interaction among those. It also expands and updates the way learning activities are perceived and acknowledges the quality of the home learning interactions – by distinguishing them from the general parenting styles – and the quality of the proximal caregiving environment as the heart of the home learning environment.
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Research evidence suggests children experiencing adversity are at risk of language disparities in early childhood. This puts these children at risk of poor language outcomes, perpetuating disadvantage in later development and academic life. This study aimed to investigate associations between Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) attendance, hours of attendance and quality in a cohort of 2-year-old children experiencing adversity with their language outcomes at age five. Pregnant women experiencing adversity, based on women meeting two or more of 10 factors on a brief risk factor survey, were recruited from maternity hospitals in Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. At age 2 years, ECEC data was collected via survey, including ECEC attendance, amount of time spent and ECEC quality (using the Australian government’s national measure of quality, the National Quality Standard assessment) ( n = 161). At age 5 years, child language outcomes were measured using a standardised language assessment. This data was analysed using logistic regressions and the non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis test to identify associations. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found language scores at age five were higher, on average, for children who attended ECEC at age two compared to those who did not attend. However, hours of attendance and ECEC quality, was not found to be associated with language outcomes. Findings suggest ECEC attendance in the early developmental years (birth to age 3 years) may be a protective factor against social disadvantage factors and contribute to positive language development for children experiencing adversity. This information is important for the ECEC sector, policymakers and families to advocate, enable and ensure high-quality ECEC is accessible, particularly for children experiencing adversity.
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The importance of early childhood education and care (ECEC) for society as a whole is undisputed. Not least, the coronavirus pandemic has clearly demonstrated the major role ECEC plays for parents as they plan their personal and professional lives. The quantitative expansion of ECEC in Germany, which has been ongoing for more than a decade, shows how committed the country’s local, state and federal authorities are to meeting the growing desire parents have for their children to attend an ECEC facility. At the same time, the qualitative development of ECEC has increasingly become a focus of the (educational) policy debate, since that is what is needed if pedagogic activities in ECEC centers are to truly help children develop and learn. The law passed in 2019 to improve ECEC quality and participation (KiTa-Qualitäts- und Teilhabeverbesserungsgesetz, KiQuTG) can, despite its need for improvement, be considered the high point in this process to date. This is especially true since it anchors both the quantitative and qualitative expansion of ECEC in Germany in federal law for the first time. This could serve as a basis for creating equal living conditions for all children nationwide. The 14th edition of our State-by-State Monitoring underscores the urgent need for such a basis. Its findings reveal that, despite the massive increase in the number of slots and the quality of ECEC in all of Germany’s states, the country has not yet succeeded in providing its children with equitable participatory and educational opportunities. While significantly more of the county’s children under the age of three have been able to attend an ECEC facility in the eastern states (53%) than in the western ones (31%) due to the greater number of places available there, the quality of ECEC,as measured by the educator-to-child ratio, is higher in the west, where statistics show that one ECEC professional is responsible for two fewer children than in the east. Even if this dual gap between east and west has gradually narrowed in recent years, the persisting differences are unacceptable. The expansion of ECEC must continue and have two goals: First, all children in Germany must have access to needs-based, child-centered ECEC regardless of where they live. Second, the necessary structural conditions must be put in place so that the work ECEC professionals do is of high quality. According to a report which we recently published for the first time (Fachkräfte-Radar für KiTa und Grundschule), over 230,000 additional ECEC professionals will be needed by 2030 if both goals are to be achieved. Planning must begin now if these considerably expanded needs are to be met! Any delay would also be detrimental in light of the right to all-day care that schoolchildren will have as of 2026 – since that, too, will increase the demand for educational professionals. We need more teacher-training slots, instructors for vocational schools, and attractive employment and training opportunities for educators. What we also need now, first and foremost, are the financial resources that would make it possible to begin taking the above steps, thereby reducing the shortfall in educational staff. It is thus imperative that Germany’s federal government commit to extending its financial support within the KiQuTG framework beyond 2022. The country’s states, municipalities and educational authorities cannot overcome this Herculean financial challenge on their own. The 2021 State by State Report shows which further action is needed if KiQuTG is to truly help create equal living conditions nationwide for all children attending Germany’s ECEC centers. Its comprehensive profiles of each state provide policy makers, public administrators and the interested public with up-to-date facts and figures on Germany’s 16 ECEC systems. They can serve as the basis for further improving the quality of the child care offered in Germany. This year, there are additional evaluations of the care available to both preschoolers and school-aged children. Our redesigned portal www.laendermonitor.de also contains many supplementary indicators for these areas. Finally, the forecasts published for the first time in the above-mentioned Fachkräfte- Radar für KiTa und Grundschule are available as valuable additional information in the country profiles.
Article
Playful learning has garnered supporters and research evidence, and also can be seen as nebulous and, therefore, reliant on practitioners’ intuitions in early education settings. In this paper, we offer an explicit theoretical account, grounded in developmental psychology of how play might support the acquisition of broad skills and dispositions for lifelong learning. We argue that play develops self-regulation and motivation, both of which support the child’s agency in their learning. We discuss a culturally inclusive view of agency that is distinct from autonomy, and which is visible in many existing early childhood pedagogies. We conclude by suggesting practical strategies that educators can adopt to enhance learning through play and children’s agency in their learning.
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