Conference Paper

Analysis of Requirements for a Cyber Physical Production System in the Automotive Industry

Authors:
  • Institute of Digital Innovation and Research (IDIR)
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Abstract

This paper reports on a Systems Analysis task for specifying the business requirements of a leading automotive industry manufacturer for augmenting their production system with cyber physical components to address two problems that they are currently facing with inbound logistics and production interruptions both of which could result in substantial financial losses. Requirements were captured, documented and reasoned about using a systematic approach that was facilitated by a conceptual modeling framework, consisting of 4 modeling views, for iteratively representing information gathered from domain experts and for validating the requirements.

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