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A design of toxic gas detecting security robot car based on wireless path-patrol

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Because a toxic gas detecting/monitoring system in a chemical plant is not movable, a gas detecting/monitoring system will be passive and the detecting range will also be constrained. This invention is an active multi-functional wireless patrol car that can substitute for humans that inspect a plant's security. In addition, to widen the monitoring vision within the environment, two motors used to rotate a wireless IPCAM with two axes are presented. Also, to control the robot car's movement, two axis motors used to drive the wheel of the robot car are also installed. Additionally, a toxic gas detector is linked to the microcontroller of the patrol car. The detected concentration of the gas will be fed back to the server pc. To enhance the robot car's patrolling duration, a movable electrical power unit in conjunction with a wireless module is also used. Consequently, this paper introduces a wireless path-patrol and toxic gas detecting security robot car that can assure a plant's security and protect workers when toxic gases are emitted.
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MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
* Corresponding author: minchie.chiu@msa.hinet.net
A design of toxic gas detecting security robot car based on
wireless path-patrol
Ho-Chih Cheng1, Min-Chie Chiu1,*, Kun-Fu Zeng1, and Che-Min Chiu2
1 Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Chung Chou University of Science and Technology, 6, Lane 2, Sec.3,
Shanchiao Rd., Yuanlin, Changhua 51003, Taiwan, R.O.C.
2 Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, R.O.C.
Abstract. Because a toxic gas detecting/monitoring s ystem in a chemical plant is not movable, a gas
detecting/monitoring system will be passive and the detecting range will also be constrained. This invention is an
active multi-functional wireless patrol car that can substitute for humans that inspect a plantȽs security. In
addition, to widen the monitoring vision within the environment, two motors used to rotate a wireless IPCAM
with two axes are presented. Also, to control the robot cars movement, two axis motors used to drive the wheel of
the robot car are also installed. Additionally, a toxic gas detector is linked to the microcontroller of the patrol car.
The detected concentration of the gas will be fed back to the server pc. To enhance the robot cars patrolling
duration, a movable electrical power unit in conjunction with a wireless module is also used. Consequently, this
paper introduces a wireless path-patrol and toxic gas detecting security robot car that can assure a plants security
and protect workers when toxic gases are emitted.
1 Introduction
Toxic gases are very often released in chemical plants.
Most of the dangerous toxic gases are colorless, odorless,
and tasteless. Some of them (methane (CH4), nitrogen
dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen sulphide) emitted from the
underground region (H2S) are not easily detected by
human senses and are flammable and lighter than air [1].
As investigated by Steenland et al.[2] and Lind [3], the
complex nature of chemical plants increases the risks for
maintenance workers who are often close to a broad
variety of hazardous chemicals. In addition, fine
particulate air pollution is harmful to humans [4, 5, 6].
Therefore, in order to ensure a workers health, detecting
toxic gases and fine particles is essential. In pass decades,
traditional gas detecting/monitoring stations in chemical
plants have also been established [7, 8]. But, because of
their fixed location, they are passive and their detecting
range is constrained. Additionally, to recognize gas
categories, large gas monitoring systems, which include
many gas detecting stations, have been presented [9].
However, the cost is huge. In order to overcome the
above drawbacks, a robot car used to patrol and detect
toxic gas emissions in a plant is presented.
The application of robots used in smart homes has
been widely developed. In previous studies, Chiu et al.
developed wireless vacuum cleaning systems by using a
robot car [10]. In order to advance cleaning efficiency,
the path-planning for a robot car using various artificial
intelligent algorithms has been explored [11, 12, 13].
Also, to improve the electrical duration of the robot car,
a wall plug-in power supply system [14] and a cable
spooling system [15] have been established. To verify
the ground purity of the vacuum cleaning work, ground-
purity inspection, vision guidance, and positioning and
path planning for a robotic cleaner has been explored [16,
17, 18]. Moreover, Chiu et al. has also applied the robot
car as an auto-tracking carrier to an AGV using a wave-
varied detecting method [19]. To ensure security at home,
a real-time editing task service-oriented security robot
has also been developed [20].
Here, in order to patrol and to detect toxic fumes
within plants, a wireless path-patrol and toxic gas
detecting security robot car is presented.
2 Robot car system
As indicated in Figure 1, the robot car system includes a
PC control port, a stick control port, a visual port, a gas
sensor, and a robot car. A toxic gas sensor (methane)
connected to the microcontroller which is installed onto
the robot car can detect the toxic gas and send back the
data to server PC port via the blue tooth prorocol. In
order to remotely monitor/control the robot car, a
wireless USB AP router wirelessly connected to the
IPCAM is adopted and connected to the server PC via
the Wi-Fi protocol. In addition, a PS2 stick (stick control
port) used to control the direction of the carrier (robot
car) and the rotating angle of the servo motor (for the
IPCAM) is connected to the server PC. The robot car is
also wirelessly connected to the server PC via the blue
tooth protocol. As indicated in Figure 2, in order to
increase electrical duration during a patrolling mission, a
power bank, a 5 Volt Ni-MH battery, is also installed
onto the robot car.
2
MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
Fig. 1. Structure of the wireless path-patrol and toxic gas
detecting security robot car.
Fig. 2. Prototype of the wireless path-patrol and toxic gas
detecting security robot car.
As shown in Figures 3 and 4, ArduinoUNO and
Arduino sensor shield v5 single chips are adopted as the
microcontroller. In addition, the PS2 stick modules
functional diagram is depicted in Figure 5. The related
functions of the PS2 stick is shown in Figure 6.
Hardware for the motor driven board and the Arduino
expanded board is illustrated in Figure 7. Moreover, the
electrical circuit for the blue tooth protocol is shown in
Figure 8. For the pin connection, the corresponding pins
of blue tooth with respect to Arduino expanded board is
shown in Table 1. The corresponding pins of the motor
driven board with respect to the Arduino expanded board
is depicted in Table 2. Also, the corresponding pins of
the PS2 stick board (for the carriers motor control) with
respect to the Arduino expanded board are illustrated in
Table 3. Consequently, the corresponding pins of the
PS2 stick board (for the IPCAMs servo motor control)
with respect to the Arduino expanded board are listed in
Table 4.
Fig. 3. ArduinoUNO electrical circuit diagram.
Fig. 4. Arduino sensor shield v5 functional diagram.
3
MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
Fig. 5. PS2 stick modules functional diagram.
Fig. 6. Functions of the PS2 stick.
Fig. 7. Hardware of the motor driver board and the Arduino
expanded board.
Fig. 8. Electrical circuit for the blue tooth protocol.
Table 1. The corresponding pins of the blue tooth with respect
to the Arduino expanded board.
pin of blue
tooth
pin of
Arduino
expanded
board
pin of blue
tooth
pin of Arduino
expanded
board
VCC
COM(+)
TXD
COM(RX)
GND
COM(-)
RXD
COM(TX)
Table 2. The corresponding pins of the motor driven board
with respect to the Arduino expanded board.
pin of
motor
driven
board
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
pin of motor
driven
board
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
ENA
6
OUTA
+ pole(left
side)
INA
4
OUTB
- pole(left
side)
INB
5
OUTC
+ pole(right
side)
INC
7
OUTD
- pole(right
side)
IND
8
ENB
11
Table 3. The corresponding pins of the PS2 stick board (for the
carriers motor control) with respect to the Arduino expanded
board.
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
pin of PS2
stick board
(for carriers
motor
control)
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
A1
S-X
A0
V
S-X -VCC
V
G
S-X -GND
G
N/A
S-K -GND
N/A
N/A
Table 4. The corresponding pins of the PS2 stick board (for the
IPCAMs servo motor control) with respect to the Arduino
expanded board.
pin of PS2
stick board
(for
IPCAMs
servo motor
control)
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
pin of PS2
stick board
(for
IPCAMs
servo motor
control)
pin of motor
driven board
Arduino
expanded
board
S-Y
A4
S-X
A3
S-Y -VCC
V
S-X -VCC
V
S-Y -GND
G
S-X -GND
G
S-K
N/A
S-K -VCC
N/A
S-K -GND
N/A
3 Human/machine interface
Using the RS-232 communication standard and blue
tooth protocol, the server port (server pc) is wirelessly
connected to the microcontroller (single chip). Here,
microcontroller connects to the actuators (servo motors,
DC motors) and the toxic gas sensor (methane detector).
4
MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
As indicated in Figure 2, the IPCAM connected to the
wireless AP router will capture the image and send it
back to the PC server. As shown in Figure 1, the PS2
module used to control both the carriers direction and
the IPCAMs vision is linked to the server PC via the
USB protocol.
To remotely manipulate the robot car and implement
visual monitoring/gas detecting, an interface of the
server PC programmed by Microsoft VB2010 is required.
As illustrated in Figure 9, the interface of the server PC
is initiated. The control panel (at the left and lower side)
for manipulating the direction of the carriern will be
enabled when the COM No. is inputted and the
connect button is clicked. Subsequently, the
concentration of the toxic gas (methane) detected by the
gas sensor will be sent back and shown on the server
PCs interface (at the left and lower side). Alternatively,
as depicted in Figure 10, the PS2s stick will replace the
server PCs manipulation when the PCs control
connection is terminated, the PS2s COM number is
inputted, and the PS2s connect button is clicked. At this
time, the user can freely manipulate the carrier and the
IPCAMs rotation by using the PS2 stick. As indicated in
Figure 11, the system will be terminated when clicking
the exit button.
Fig. 9. Interface in server PC port.
Fig. 10. Interface for connecting to the PS2 port.
Fig. 11. Interface for exit.
4 Results and Discussion
A robot car system equipped with a server PC control
port, a stick control port, a visual port, and a robot car
has been demonstrated. The patrolling path can be
remotely controlled via the server PC control port and
stick control port. The IPCAMs vision can be adjusted
by controlling the servo motors via the server PC control
port and stick control port. Both toxic gas concentration
and environmental vision can be obtained and fedback to
the server PC. As indicated in Figure 12(a)-(e), the toxic
gas concentration has been detected and sent back to the
server PCs interface. The environmental vision has been
captured by the IPCAM and fedback to the interface.
The user can warn the plant via a broadcasting device
when either the toxic gas emissions or security problems
arrive.
The site testing for the wireless path-patrol and toxic
gas detecting security robot car is shown in Figure 13.
Fig. 12(a). Remote toxic gas detecting and environmental
security monitoring - Vision capture#1.
5
MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
Fig. 12(b). Remote toxic gas detecting and environmental
security monitoring - Vision capture#2.
Fig. 12(c). Remote toxic gas detecting and environmental
security monitoring - Vision capture#3.
Fig. 12(d). Remote toxic gas detecting and environmental
security monitoring - Vision capture#4.
Fig. 12(e). Remote toxic gas detecting and environmental
security monitoring - Vision capture#5.
Fig. 13(a). Operational result of a wireless Path-Patrol and
Toxic Gas Detecting Security robot car. - server PC port.
Fig. 13(b). Operational result of a wireless Path-Patrol and
Toxic Gas Detecting Security robot car. - manipulating in
server PC.
Fig. 13(c). Operational result of a wireless Path-Patrol and
Toxic Gas Detecting Security robot car. - robot car moving.
Fig. 13(d). Operational result of a wireless Path-Patrol and
Toxic Gas Detecting Security robot car. - robot car moving.
6
MATEC Web of Conferences 123 , 00035 ( 2017 ) DOI: 10.1051/matecconf/201712300035
ICPMMT 2017
5 Conclusion
It has been shown that a wireless path-patrol and toxic
gas detecting security robot car can remotely monitor
vision and toxic gas emissions in a plant. Using the RS-
232 communication standard and blue tooth protocol, the
server port (server pc) is wirelessly connected to the
microcontroller (single chip). The microcontroller
connects to the gas sensor (methane sensor) and four
outputs (two servo motors and two DC motor). In
addition, in order to remotely monitor environmental
status, a wireless USB AP router wirelessly connected to
the IPCAM is adopted. The image can be sent back to
the server PC via the Wi-Fi protocol. To implement the
path-patrol and toxic gas detecting security work, a
human/machine interface in the server PC port
programmed by Microsoft VB 2010 has been established
and shown in Figures 9-11. A user can manipulate the
robot cars patrolling path and adjust the IPCAMs
vision angle via the server PC port or the PS2 stick port.
Additionally, the current image shown in Figure 12 can
also be captured and sent back by the IPCAM via the
Wi-Fi protocol. Moreover, a user can remotely
manipulate the robot car to detect gas emissions without
danger. A warning via the broadcast device from the
control center will be sent to the whole plant when either
toxic gas emissions or security problem occur.
Consequently, a prototype of the wireless path-patrol
and toxic gas detecting security robot car to ensure
workers safety and plant security is established.
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