Conference Paper

Development of context cards: a bus-specific ideation tool for co-design workshops

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Abstract

The importance of context is widely studied in design practice. Still, design workshops often take place in meeting rooms, with the help of generic design materials. To support the participants' understanding of the context of products or services, context-specific design materials can be utilized. The aim of this study was to gain design-relevant insights on how to support ideation with context-specific card-based design tool. Thus, this paper presents Context Cards - a bus-specific ideation cards for co-design workshops. We present the four-phase process of the card tool development in our study of early stage co-design of digital services for the bus context. The findings reveal that the developed Context Cards aided the participants' ability to ideate new services for the specific context. As a concrete outcome of our design research study, we present the final version of the cards, and insights on how they can be used.

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... These tools can be particularly useful in inviting participation among people in conceptualizing new types of Internet of Things (IoT) design interventions, which often combine tangible objects embedded with distributed connectivity and computation. Here, co-design tools can embody functional building blocks, such as sensors and actuators, to permit an immersive exploration of the design space [3,14,15,19,20]. Co-design tools can also simulate such building blocks together with contextual concepts, such as places, people, and goals. ...
... Technology-enabled ideation tools [3,14,15,19,20] foster the design process by providing actual functionality and are particularly valuable for prototyping. This is a challenging balance between offering the full flexibility of a limited set of functions or limited flexibility of a broad set of functions. ...
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... Hence, we have developed a Travel Experience Toolkit that consists of different tools that can be utilized in different phases of the design process to bring the user perspective to the centre of the design. A concept of this toolkit [19] consisted of preliminary personas, Context Cards [18], and a Passenger Journey Map. In addition to these tools, we have also created a Bus Travel Experience Model [20] that presents the elements impacting the intra-city bus travel experience: Passenger and their own mood and values, Context including social, temporal, task and physical context; System of public transportation and the System of digital services on the mobile device. ...
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