Article

Potential impact of Neospora caninun infection on farm productivity of fallow deer ( Dama dama )

Authors:
  • Witod Stefanski institute of Parasitology of the Polish Academy of Sciences
  • Witold Stefanski Institute of Parasitology Polish Academy of Sciences
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Abstract

Most evidence suggesting vertical transmission as the predominant transmission route has been obtained from serological studies. Thus a modified ELISA procedure to detect antibodies in the sera of animals (Dama dama) living in farm conditions in a field station was investigated. Two groups of animals were formed: Group I consisting of 15 hinds naturally infected with Neospora caninum, and Group II consisting of 15 uninfected hinds. In Group I, eleven offspring were born in 2013, another nine in 2014, and eight in 2015. In Group II, 14 offspring were born in 2013, 13 in 2014 and 13 in 2015. All offspring in Group II were seronegative against N. caninum. Significantly fewer offspring were born from seropositive hinds (p < 0.05). Infected hinds (Group I) gave 21.4%, 30.8% and 38.5% fewer offspring than uninfected hinds (Group II) in the years 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Additionally, not all offspring born in Group I were seropositive. The overall vertical transmission ratio of N. caninum in naturally infected fallow deer achieved 82.1% (63.6% in 2013, 100% in 2014 and 67.8% in 2015). This is the first study identifying the impact of the parasite on fallow deer productivity according to a significant reduction in birth rate. And also suggest that, naturally N. caninum infected buck does not appear to transmit infection to the hinds by natural fertilization.

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... The study on the seroprevalence of T. gondii and N. caninum in fallow deer in European countries are limited (Bartova et al., 2007;Bień et al., 2012;Cabaj et al., 2017). ...
... In our study, anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were detected using indirect ELISA (ID VET, Montpellier, France) validated for many animal species (Špilovská et al., 2009; Čobadiová et al., 2013). Due to our earlier experience (Bień et al., 2012;Cabaj et al., 2017) antibodies to N. ...
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It is clear from researching the vertical transmission of Neospora caninum in cattle that the terms 'vertical', 'congenital' and, indeed, 'transplacental' are inadequate for describing two extremely different situations that have fundamentally different immunological, epidemiological and control implications. A similar situation pertains to Toxoplasma gondii in different hosts. We advocate the use of the terms 'endogenous transplacental infection (TPI)' to define foetal infection from a recrudescent maternal infection acquired before pregnancy (and probably prenatally) and 'exogenous TPI' to define foetal infection that occurs as a result of an infection of the dam during pregnancy.
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The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major cause of abortion in cattle. The diagnosis of neosporosis-associated mortality and abortion in cattle is difficult. In the present paper we review histologic, serologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular methods for dignosis of bovine neosporosis. Although not a routine method of diagnosis, methods to isolate viable N. caninum from bovine tissues are also reviewed.
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White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve to maintain the Neospora caninum life cycle in the wild. Sera from white-tailed deer from south central Wisconsin and southeastern Missouri, USA were tested for antibodies to N. caninum by Western blot analyses and two indirect ELISAs. Seroreactivity against N. caninum surface antigens was observed in 30 of 147 (20%) of WI deer and 11 of 23 (48%) of MO deer using Western blot analysis. Compared to Western blot, the two indirect ELISAs were found to be uninformative due to degradation of the field-collected samples. The results indicate the existence of N. caninum antibodies in MO and WI deer, and that Western blot is superior to ELISA for serologic testing when using degraded blood samples collected from deer carcasses.
Dynamic increase in fallow deer and red deer farming in Poland (in Polish)
  • B Borys
  • Z Bogdaszewska
  • M Bogdaszewski
Borys, B., Bogdaszewska, Z., Bogdaszewski, M., 2012. Dynamic increase in fallow deer and red deer farming in Poland (in Polish). Wiad. Zootechniczne 1, 33-44.