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Psychopathie en deceptie: de relatie tussen psychopathie, sociale wenselijkheid en leugenachtig gedrag

Abstract

Deceptie of misleiding is een ruim gedefinieerd construct dat door menig auteur als één van de belangrijkste kenmerken van psychopathie wordt beschouwd (Babiak & Hare, 2006; Cleckley, 1988). Het is echter onduidelijk welke deceptiecomponenten aan psychopathie gerelateerd zijn en hoe individuen met psychopathische trekken deceptie ervaren. Het doel van de huidige studie was om het verband tussen psychopathie, sociale wenselijkheid, impressiemanagement, zelfdeceptie, leugenfrequentie, gevoelens tijdens en na het liegen en leugenmotieven te onderzoeken. Het onderzoek werd door middel van een survey uitgevoerd in de algemene populatie (N = 671). Een onderdeel van deze steekproef (n = 197) nam deel aan een leugendagboekstudie. Psychopathie werd gemeten aan de hand van de Self-Report Psychopathy scale Short Form (Paulhus et al., 2016) en de Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (Patrick, 2010). Sociale wenselijkheid werd gemeten met de Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised: Lie Scale (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1991) en de Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding V6 (Paulhus, 1994). Ten slotte werd leugenachtig gedrag onderzocht aan de hand van de Lying Frequency Questionnaire (Serota et al., 2010) en een Anagramleugentaak (Wiltermuth, 2011). De resultaten tonen aan dat psychopathie negatief geassocieerd is met sociale wenselijkheid en impressiemanagement maar dat het verband met zelfdeceptie inconsistent is. Daarnaast liegen individuen met psychopathische trekken vaker, ze ervaren positievere emoties tijdens en na het liegen en vertonen een positievere attitude ten aanzien van liegen. Verder bleek dat zij meer liegen omwille van de voordelen of om straf te vermijden. Tot slot worden de theoretische en forensische implicaties besproken in de discussie.
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... Serota and Levine (2015) replicated the lie distribution finding with 2980 subjects in the U.K., including replications in the culturally variant England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland sub-samples. Stockman (2017) observed the long-tail distribution in Belgium, and a re-examination of data reported by Zvi and Elaad (2018) found the same distribution among Israeli subjects. Most recently, the skewed lie distribution has been replicated in South Korea (Park et al., 2021) and Japan (Diaku et al., 2021). ...
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... It was also observed with a large representative sample from the United Kingdom, (Serota & Levine, 2015), and the general UK finding replicated in each of the geographic/cultural subsets of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Lie frequency measures were also obtained, but not reported, as elements of studies in Belgium (Stockman, 2017) and Israel (Zvi & Elaad, 2018) with subsequent re-analysis providing evidence for the TDT propositions (authors, unpublished). The pattern has further been supported in text messaging (Smith, Hancock, Reynolds, & Birnholtz, 2014) and mobile dating conversations (Markowitz & Hancock, 2018). ...
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IntroductionThe Construct of Psychopathy and Its Presence in WomenHow Psychopathic Women PresentThe Practical Management of Women With Psychopathic TraitsFuture Directions in Practice and ResearchReferences
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