ArticlePDF AvailableLiterature Review

Health Benefits Of Manuka Honey As An Essential Constituent For Tissue Regeneration

Authors:
  • Cholistan University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences (CUVAS)-Bahawalpur-63100 Pakistan
  • Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS)

Abstract

Background: Honey is known for its therapeutic properties from ancient civilizations. Recently, the mechanism of action of Manuka honey in wound healing, epithelial regeneration, and ulcer treatments has been revealed. Objective: In the current review, the health perspectives of honey, its chemical composition with special reference to flavonoids, polyphenol, and other bioactive trace compounds used in tissue regeneration have been discussed in detail. Methods: We undertook a structured search using wide spectrum sources like Google Scholar, PubMed, and Scopus. Results: The included papers showed that Manuka honey can inhibit the process of carcinogenesis by controlling different molecular processes, and progression of cancer cells. Manuka honey has been found to have various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-proliferative capacities. Scientists try to use Manuka honey in the area of tissue engineering to design a template for regeneration. Naturally derived antibacterial agents of Manuka honey are numerous mixtures of different compounds, which can influence antibacterial capacity. The non-peroxide bacteriostatic properties of Manuka honey are associated with the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO). Conclusion: In addition to bacterial growth inhibition, glyoxal (GO) and MGO from Manuka honey can enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration by their immunomodulatory property. Further studies are needed to provide detailed information about active components of Manuka honey and their potential efficacy in different diseases.
Curr Drug Metab. 2017;18(10):881-892. doi: 10.2174/1389200218666170911152240.
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Health Benefits of Manuka Honey as
an Essential Constituent for Tissue
Regeneration
Kamal Niaz 1, Faheem Maqbool 1, Haji Bahadar 2, Mohammad Abdollahi 1
1. International Campus, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (IC-TUMS), Tehran. Iran.
2. Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Khyber Medical University, Peshawar. Pakistan.
ABSTRACT
Background: Honey is known for its therapeutic properties from ancient civilizations. Recently,
the mechanism of action of Manuka honey in wound healing, epithelial regeneration, and ulcer
treatments has been revealed.
Objective: In the current review, the health perspectives of honey, its chemical composition with
special reference to flavonoids, polyphenol, and other bioactive trace compounds used in tissue
regeneration have been discussed in detail.
Methods: We undertook a structured search using wide spectrum sources like Google Scholar,
PubMed, and Scopus.
Results: The included papers showed that Manuka honey can inhibit the process of
carcinogenesis by controlling different molecular processes, and progression of cancer cells.
Manuka honey has been found to have various biological activities, including antioxidant,
antimicrobial and anti-proliferative capacities. Scientists try to use Manuka honey in the area of
tissue engineering to design a template for regeneration. Naturally derived antibacterial agents of
Manuka honey are numerous mixtures of different compounds, which can influence antibacterial
capacity. The non-peroxide bacteriostatic properties of Manuka honey are associated with the
presence of methylglyoxal (MGO).
Conclusion: In addition to bacterial growth inhibition, glyoxal (GO) and MGO from Manuka
honey can enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration by their immunomodulatory property.
Further studies are needed to provide detailed information about active components of Manuka
honey and their potential efficacy in different diseases.
Keywords: Honey; Leptospermum scoparium; Manuka honey; antimicrobial; methyl-glyoxal;
polyphenols; review; tissue regeneration.
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