Conference Paper

Smart gyms need smart mirrors: design of a smart gym concept through contextual inquiry

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Abstract

Much research on smart environments has focused on homes and offices. With increasing physical inactivity and its health effects, augmenting gyms to motivate, assist and coach users to track and achieve their fitness goals is important. In this paper, we propose using smart mirrors to automatically detect and count repetitions of exercises, and to provide coaching, motivation and information to users. We present the concept and use cases, developed with 7 users (novices and fitness fanatics) through contextual inquiry, and discuss how the concept can be realized with current technologies.

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... A central challenge for instructional videos stems from how the user, in these settings, is learning on their own from pre-recorded material, which leads to a lack of feedback and personalised instructions [51,77], and to having to rely on their own imitation capacity to learn movements, which in itself is challenging [29]. To date, research addressing this challenge has mostly focused on augmented feedback, i.e., providing trainees with information about their movements to help them assess their performance in a variety of contexts, e.g.,: strength training [3,20,59], dance [2,12], yoga [15,56,72], physiotherapy [1,38,68], and sports [60,76]. ...
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... Furthermore, smart mirrors have become a popular interface element in both research [50,6,26] and commercially. In recent years, we have seen smart mirrors extend beyond functional devices, being employed in bespoke, open-ended interfaces that promote ludic engagement [60,30]. ...
... Furthermore, smart mirrors have become a popular interface element in both research [50,6,26] and commercially. In recent years, we have seen smart mirrors extend beyond functional devices, being employed in bespoke, open-ended interfaces that promote ludic engagement [60,30]. ...
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Orkan Telhan, and Rahul Mangharam Cloud Mat: Context-Aware Personalization of Fitness Content
  • Jin Kuk
  • Jungmin Jang
  • Ryoo