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Energy security analysis and future recommendations to enhance energy security based on expenditures for R&D and education and levels of rule of law and democracy

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Abstract

This paper sheds the light on an important aspect of the energy system: Energy Security. Energy security is a global issue that directs policy makers to vote decisions in. The promise for a more secure energy system is meant to provide societies with a better life. As energy security is a multidimensional concept, this paper investigates the relationship between four different parameters with energy security in a global holistic view. All countries with reliable data are compared in regards to their energy security based on these four parameters (R&D, education, rule of law and democracy). The results show clearly that there is a substantial difference between countries in their energy security level. It also, provides conclusions to policy makers of how energy security can be enhanced.

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