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Poster abstract: economics-inspired modeling of data centre power flexibility

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Abstract

Keeping the power grid stable becomes more and more challenging with the increasing share of distributed and intermittent power generation from renewables. Facing this challenge requires using all flexibility options including adaptive power demand. Data centers are huge energy consumers, but fortunately they possess inherent flexibility through shiftable workloads and highly automated processes. Therefore, demand response with data centres has been a hot topic for the last decade. With few exceptions, all studies carried out in the area of demand response with data centres come to the conclusion that both, data centres and the electricity system, would profit immensely from this approach However, in reality demand response with data centres is hardly ever reported. This paper introduces an economics inspired point of view to a topic dominated by power modelling and argues that both decreasing power saving efficiencies as well as market and business driven parameters must be accounted for.

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