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The interplay between individual values, culture and institutions in explaining entrepreneurship

Thesis

The interplay between individual values, culture and institutions in explaining entrepreneurship

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... This article's starting point is based on two theoretical assumptions (Morales, 2016). First, entrepreneurship is fundamentally personal (e.g., Baum, Frese, Baron, & Katz, 2007). ...
Article
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Although individual values have been scarcely studied in the entrepreneurship literature, existing research provides evidence that they are relevant for understanding entrepreneurial behavior. Values, however, do not necessarily influence action in a direct way. Instead, they may indirectly predict behavior via more proximal psychological processes. We build upon previous research in entrepreneurship values using Schwartz (1992) individual-values theory and Frese’s (2007) entrepreneurial action theory, and propose a theoretical model in which individual values have an indirect effect on entrepreneurial behavior through a series of four ulterior cognitive processes: Goal setting and intentions, mapping of information about the environment, planning and monitoring of the execution, and feedback processing. In doing so we integrate the theory of individual values with entrepreneurial cognition research. Despite their complementarity, these two theoretical approaches have not been studied together before. In this way, we offer new insights on the way individual values can explain entrepreneurial action. Based on these two lines of research we additionally propose a research agenda.
... This article's starting point is based on two theoretical assumptions (Morales, 2016). First, entrepreneurship is fundamentally personal (e.g., Baum, Frese, Baron, & Katz, 2007). ...
Conference Paper
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How do individual values explain entrepreneurship? Although individual values have been scarcely studied in the entrepreneurship literature, existent research shows that they are relevant for understanding entrepreneurial behaviour. Values, however, do not necessarily influence action directly. Instead, they may indirectly predict behaviour via more proximal psychological processes. We build upon previous research in entrepreneurship values using Schwartz (1992) individual-values theory and Frese’s (2007) entrepreneurial action theory, and propose a theoretical model in which individual values have an indirect effect on entrepreneurial behaviour through a series of ulterior cognitive processes. In doing so we integrate two theoretical approaches that despite being complementary have not been studied together before. We then, offer new insights on the way individual values can explain entrepreneurial action. Keywords: Individual values, action, entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial behaviour
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