Amino Acids as Food Quality Factors in Parmigiano Reggiano Hard Cheese

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DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-812824-4.00019-8
In book: Advances in Asymmetric Autocatalysis and Related Topics, pp.357-367
Cite this publication
Abstract
Free and peptide/protein bonded acids were qualitatively and quantitatively determined in parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiano) cheese samples by HPLC. d/. l ratio was measured using a chiral derivatizing agent. The diffusion processes of free amino acids occurring in Parmigiano Reggiano hard cheese can be regarded and utilized as a characteristic molecular marker of its ripening.
CHAPTER 19
Amino Acids as Food Quality
Factors in Parmigiano Reggiano
Hard Cheese
Franco Bellesia
1
, Adriano Pinetti
1
, Livia Simon-Sarkadi
2
,
Claudia Zucchi
1
, János Csapó
3
, Bart Weimer
4
, Luciano Caglioti
5
and
Gyula Pályi
1
1
Department of Chemistry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
2
Institute of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, Technical University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
3
Faculty of Animal Science, University of Kaposva
´r, Kaposva
´r, Hungary
4
Nutrition and Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, United States
5
Department of Chemistr y and Technology of Biologically Act ive Compounds,
University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy
Abstract
Free and peptide/protein bonded acids were qualitatively and quantitatively deter-
mined in parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiano) cheese samples by HPLC. D/Lratio was
measured using a chiral derivatizing agent. The diffusion processes of free amino
acids occurring in Parmigiano Reggiano hard cheese can be regarded and utilized as
a characteristic molecular marker of its ripening.
Keywords: Free amino acids; HPLC analysis; d/l ratio of amino acids; cheese ripening;
Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
19.1 INTRODUCTION
One of the most typical products of Italian agricultural/food industry is
the grana parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiano) type hard cheese [1].Two
principal kinds are known as Grana Padano and Grana Parmigiano
Reggiano (these names are also registered trademarks). The latter is pro-
duced in the territories ranging from the Po river to the Apennine moun-
tains in the provinces of Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and, partly, of
Bologna and Mantova [2]. A Consortium of small- and medium-sized
cheese factories, mainly cooperatives, produces Parmigiano Reggiano
exclusively from cows’ milk. The producers must obey the rigorously con-
trolled rules of the Consortium (D.M. 17/06/1956), starting from the ali-
mentation of the cows to the production and ripening processes. These
357
Advances in Asymmetric Autocatalysis and Related Topics
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-812824-4.00019-8
©2017 Elsevier Inc.
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  • Article
    The importance of amino acids and biogenic amines is widely recognised in various fields, particularly in the fields of food science and nutrition. This mini-review contains a summary of my main research field that centres on aspects of Food Quality and Food Safety, with a particular emphasis on amino acids and biogenic amines. It also gives an overview of the recent developments on the related areas. ©2019 IUPAC & De Gruyter. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. For more information, please visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ 2019.
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