Conference Paper

Questioning User Experience: A Comparison Between Visual, Auditory and Haptic Guidance Messages Among Older Pedestrians

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Abstract

Designing a navigation aid adapted to older pedestrians' specificities could help in preserving their autonomy. Indeed, older people rely on walk for their daily journeys more than any other people. But cognitive and perceptive abilities may decline with aging and impair the pedestrian mobility. This study was aimed at comparing visual, auditory and haptic guidance messages among older pedestrians. Navigation performance and user experience (UX) were taken into account. Time to destination and rate of correct responses were measured in a pedestrian navigation simulator. Post-activity interviews were used to question participants' perceptions, feelings and hesitations. Results showed great performance and UX for visual messages, whereas results were mixed for haptic messages.

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... Par défaut, pour limiter la charge attentionnelle, il était indiqué aux participants de continuer tout droit en l'absence de messages. Les messages visuels et auditifs utilisés étaient issus de travaux relatifs à la perception et à la compréhension de messages de guidage pas-à-pas par les personnes âgées en environnement virtuel [42,43]. Les flèches imitaient celles utilisées par les GPS, et étaient affichées sur tout l'espace de l'écran de réalité augmentée. ...
... Nous supposons que ce sentiment a pu être renforcé par une moins bonne qualité de la connexion Bluetooth entre les lunettes et le smartphone. Il est intéressant de noter que seulement 3 participants ont déclaré suivre « aveuglément » les indications, contrairement à ce qui est souvent reproché aux aides à la navigation [42]. Une très grande majorité de participants (15/18) a été engagée dans un processus actif de prise de décision. ...
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... The arrows displayed by the AR glasses and by the smartwatch were the same and were based on previous tests in virtual reality [30,64]. Large flat green arrows were used to improve their perceptibility, even among older people suffering from visual impairments [65] (see Figure 5). ...
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This article discusses two related techniques, critical incident technique (CIT) and explicitation, which are used in a variety of social science research settings, and critically reviews their application to studies of information behavior. The current application of both techniques is compared with Flanagan's early guidelines on the CIT and is discussed in relation to recent experience in the use of (1) the CIT in the JUSTEIS and VIVOS projects and (2) explicitation in projects concerned with text entering on interactive Web sites. The JUSTEIS project identifies trends, and reasons for those trends, in the uptake and use of electronic information services in higher education in the United Kingdom; this article examines experience gained over the first two cycles—1999 to 2000 and 2000 to 2001. The VIVOS project evaluated virtual health library services. Comparison of the experiences gained on the various projects suggests that critical incident methods could usefully be extended and enriched by some explicitation methods, to elicit the degree of evocation required for current and future studies of Internet use.
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Usability engineering aims at improving interactive systems and their user interfaces, Defined slightly more precisely, usability is a general concept that cannot be measured but is related to several usability parameters that can be measured. The metastudy presented later in this article did find that preference and performance were positively associated in most cases. Even so, most computer professionals probably know of cases where users did not prefer the system that would seem to be better based on the objective performance measures.
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Contrast sensitivity thresholds were measured over a range of spatial and temporal frequencies in both a group of young and older observers. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in contrast sensitivity of the older age group at all but the lowest combinations of spatial and temporal frequencies investigated. The senile miosis and reduced optical transmission of the older eye was then mimicked using the younger observers as subjects. This combined effect of reducing retinal illumination produced no significant change in sensitivity. These findings are discussed in terms of neural loss within the visual pathways with increasing age.
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