Article

Effect of lemongrass oil on rheumatoid arthritis

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Abstract

Aim: To do a research on the effect of lemongrass oil on rheumatoid arthritis. Methods:A total of 30 participants who were suffering from rheumatoid arthritis were chosen. They were given lemongrass oil to apply for about 30 days. The pain scale was noted for every 2 to 3 days. Results:The result showed a mild changes in the pain levels of the patient. Further application would significantly show a greater decrease in the pain levels of the patient. Conclusion:Rheumatoid arthritis being more common in old people, this study was conducted to create awareness about the effect of lemongrass oil on the same.

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... These properties and chemicals in lemongrass make it a very important medicinal plant for the curing and prevention of various ailments [39] . Meenapriya, (2017). The effect of lemongrass oil on rheumatoid arthritis. ...
... The pain scale was noted every 2 to 3 days. The final result showed mild changes in the pain levels of the patient [40] . [1] Microwave-Assisted Hydrodistillation 1.46% 2. ...
... These properties and chemicals in lemongrass make it a very important medicinal plant for the curing and prevention of various ailments [39] . Meenapriya, (2017). The effect of lemongrass oil on rheumatoid arthritis. ...
... The pain scale was noted every 2 to 3 days. The final result showed mild changes in the pain levels of the patient [40] . [1] Microwave-Assisted Hydrodistillation 1.46% 2. ...
... These properties and chemicals in lemongrass make it a very important medicinal plant for the curing and prevention of various ailments [39] . Meenapriya, (2017). The effect of lemongrass oil on rheumatoid arthritis. ...
... The pain scale was noted every 2 to 3 days. The final result showed mild changes in the pain levels of the patient [40] . [1] Microwave-Assisted Hydrodistillation 1.46% 2. ...
... The samples were collected at baseline, and after 1, 3 and 6 months following treatment. For each site GCF sample was collected by using prefabricated paper points [43], (as shown in Fig. 2) which were inserted into the pockets after drying and complete isolation of saliva using cotton rolls and high suction unit, until resistance is felt, and kept there for 30 s [43]. Any paper point with blood contamination was discarded. ...
... The samples were collected at baseline, and after 1, 3 and 6 months following treatment. For each site GCF sample was collected by using prefabricated paper points [43], (as shown in Fig. 2) which were inserted into the pockets after drying and complete isolation of saliva using cotton rolls and high suction unit, until resistance is felt, and kept there for 30 s [43]. Any paper point with blood contamination was discarded. ...
Article
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Background The gold standard in treatment of periodontitis is mechanical removing of dental biofilm but using local delivery drugs as adjunctive to SRP is widely used to modulate inflammatory host and eradicate microbes. Tea tree oil (TTO) has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant effect. This study aimed to assess clinically and biochemically the effect of intrapocket application of TTO (Melaleuca alternifolia) gel adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of stage 2 (moderate) periodontitis and to correlate the biochemical levels with clinical response. Methods A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on thirty patients with stage 2 periodontitis. Patients were equally divided into two groups: Control Group treated with (SRP) alone and Test Group treated with SRP and locally delivered 5% TTO gel. Clinical assessment included pocket probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), gingival index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP) measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. The level of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was also assessed at baseline and after1, 3 and 6 months by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Chi-square, Student t- tests, Mann–Whitney U test and Spearman correlation were the statistical tests used in the study. Results An improvement of all clinical and biochemical parameters was observed (at p < 0.001) in both groups. A significant difference between the two groups was found in both clinical and biochemical parameters. Conclusion The local delivery of TTO gel adjunctive to SRP proved to be effective in the treatment of stage II periodontitis. Trial registration The study was retrospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT04769271, on 24/2/2021.
... They work by one or more of the following mechanisms: activity reduction, free radical scavenging, pro-oxidant metal potential complexation, and oxygen quenching. The screening of essential oils and different plant extracts for natural antioxidants was highly interesting in recent decades due to their good antioxidant properties (Meenapriya et al., 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Lemongrass is a native high-flowering aromatic plant of a family: Poaceae, grown in many tropical and subsoil regions of southeastern Asia and Africa. In India, many lemongrass species are grown and cultivated in the warm, mild, wettest conditions at elevations altitude under 750 m. With average annual temperatures of between 23°C to 30°C and average annual precipitation between 2500 and 3000 mm Cymbopogon citratus produces the best. Lemongrass is an herb, it's leaves and oil are used for the treatment of bowel spasms, chest pain, higher blood pressure, epilepsy, dysentery, cough, knee achy (rheumatism), flu, common cold, and tiredness. The chemical composition of essential oils (EOs) as a signature properties of a plant and it's physiological conditions. Various environmental factors also play a critical role in the standardization of EOs. The cultivation of medicinal and aromatic vegetation (MAP) using bio-elicitors has been recommended as a real device to sustainably guarantee a higher amount and reasonable amount of EOs. The present review highlights the overall properties and applications of Lemongrass. The strong lemon fragrance in its oil is a dominant characteristic of this herb. The refining of the oil is suitable for use in soap, detergents, and fragrances. It also has various pharmaceutical applications. Whereas there is a wide range of ethno pharmacological uses for lemongrass also reported. In addition to nutrients such as fats, protein, fiber, and mineral products, there are several bioactive compounds in lemongrass, grouped into terpenoids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, phenols.
... The analgesic properties lemongrass provides relief from headache, migraine, and rheumatism (Meenapriya and Priya 2017). When applied topically, it improves blood circulation (Kamkaen et al. 2015) and can be useful for treating spasms, sprains, backaches, muscle cramps, bruises, internal injuries, dislocations, etc. ...
Chapter
Secondary metabolites (SMs) are known to have a wide range of therapeutic values. Large numbers of drugs are derived from these SMs. These naturally occurring SMs known to act as a potent source of antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and insecticidal agents. Aromatic plants are the prime source of variety of easily available SMs. Numerous classes of these SMs also act as powerful natural antioxidants. Antioxidants are the compounds that inhibit or slow down the oxidation of other molecules and help to cure the oxidative stress condition. Oxidative stress is the condition where the amount of free radicals in the body of organism exceeds the homeostatic balance of free radicals and indigenous antioxidant. This excess of free redials leads to various types of chain reactions that damage cells. These free radicals are the cause of more than hundred kinds of diseases in living beings. Cymbopogon is a genus of about 180 species of monocots grasses in a family of Poaceae (Gramineae). The species of genus Cymbopogon are rich source of naturally occurring antioxidants (such as phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, hydroquinone, terpenoids and fatty alcohols, etc.), and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates) is one of them. Further, the pharmacological applications of lemongrass are also well explored. Hence in the present chapter, we intend to discuss the botanical description, traditional uses, phytochemistry, antioxidant potential, health benefits, and potential economic importance of lemongrass.
Article
Cymbopogon citratus aqueous leaf extract (CYC) otherwise known as lemongrass tea is used for achy joints (rheumatism) and central nervous system disorders in ethnomedicine. This study was designed to investigate the effects of CYC on neurobehavioral, oxidative, and inflammatory changes produced by complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) in male Swiss mice. The mice were allotted into 6 groups (n = 6). The animals in group 1 received saline (control), group 2 also had saline (CFA-control), groups 3–5 received CYC (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg), whereas group 6 were given celecoxib (20 mg/kg) orally for 14 consecutive days. Mice in groups 2–6 also received 0.1 mL injection of CFA (10 mg/mL) into the left hind paw 30 min earlier on day 1. The paw volumes were measured on days 0, 7, and 14. Neurobehavioral changes were evaluated on day 14. Thereafter, the left hind paw tissues were processed for estimation of malondialdehyde, nitrite, glutathione, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 contents. The increase in paw volume and weight produced by CFA was reduced by CYC (p < 0.05). CYC attenuated postural instability, anxiety, depression, memory deficits, and nociceptive responses in CFA-mice. The CFA-induced increases in malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory cytokines accompanied by decreased glutathione contents in mouse hind paw were attenuated by CYC (p < 0.05). The findings that CYC reduces inflammatory edema, neurological deficits, nociception, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and release of inflammatory cytokines in CFA-treated mice further supports its acclaimed benefit in arthritic pain in ethnomedicine.
Article
Ethnopharmacological relevance: Citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal) is the main component of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf, an herb with analgesic properties. Arthritic pain is the main unpleasant component of rheumatoid arthritis. The pharmacological approaches used to treat arthritic pain are often accompanied by adjuvant drugs or non-pharmacological treatments, showing a constant need in identifying new efficient analgesic drugs. Aim of the study: To test the hypothesis that citral, which is a monoterpenoid compound with therapeutic properties, reduces nociception, spinal pro-nociceptive and pro-inflammatory signaling, and systemic oxidative stress in arthritic rats. Materials and methods: Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was administrated in the left knee joint of rats. Oral treatment with citral was performed during eight days and mechanical allodynia was monitored during the period of treatment to evaluate the analgesic effect of citral. We assessed the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the lumbar dorsal horn of the spinal cord (DHSC) and the profiles of expression of the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which is a 5-HT-regulated intracellular protein, and of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the DHSC. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were assessed as an indicator of oxidative stress. Results: Administration of CFA induced mechanical allodynia associated with reduced spinal GSK3β phosphorylation, increased spinal SAPK/JNK phosphorylation, and increased plasma SOD levels. Oral administration of citral reversed mechanical allodynia, increased endogenous spinal 5-HT levels, reduced spinal SAPK/JNK phosphorylation, and reduced plasma SOD levels. Conclusion: Citral shows anti-nociceptive effects in an animal model of arthritic pain by modulating spinal nociceptive signaling.
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