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Abstract

To compare the effectiveness of Doctor Tecar Therapy™ with that of laser therapy in the management of low back pain (LBP), a total of 60 patients with LBP were enrolled. The participants were randomly divided into two groups: a Tecar group (experimental group, 30 subjects), and a laser group (control group, 30 subjects). AH the subjects received 10 sessions of therapy: one each day from Monday to Friday and the same again the following week. All the subjects were evaluated for pain (VAS) and disability (Roland and Morris score and Oswestry score) at baseline (TO), and 2 weeks (T1), 1 month (T2) and 2 months (T3) after the end of treatment. The pain and disability presented a trend to improvement over time in both groups. This improvement was statistically significant at all follow-ups (FUs) in the Tecar group but only at T1 for the Laser group (p<0.01). Comparing the two methods, there emerged a significant difference in favour of the Tecar group at T2 and T3 (p<0.01). The results show that Tecar therapy determined significant improvement already by the end of the treatment. Moreover, at the first and second month FUs, the Tecar therapy showed statistically better results than laser therapy.
... Twelve studies [51][52][53][54][55][56][57]74,75,[89][90][91] proposed treatment for Low Back Pain (LBP) utilizing four different diathermy therapies; SWD in 7 studies, MWD in 2 studies, and CRET in 3 studies. ...
... Two studies [53,54] [51,57] showed significant changes in favour of the control group, respectively: Maitland mobilization + hot packs + core stabilization at post-treatment (MD 0.60, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.97, random-effects model) and Graeco-Arabic massage at post-treatment (MD 2.50, 95% CI 1.50 to 3.50, random-effects model). In three studies [89][90][91], non-pooled data for pain relief showed significant important changes in favour of CRET. Specifically, non-pooled data for pain relief in Zati 2018's study [89] (Table 5). ...
... 1.50 to 3.50, random-effects model). In three studies [89][90][91], non-pooled data for pain relief showed significant important changes in favour of CRET. Specifically, non-pooled data for pain relief in Zati 2018's study [89] highlighted significant changes in favour of CRET deep heating (MD −0.90, 95% CI −1.57 to −0.23, random-effects model) vs. superficial heating post-treatment. ...
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Objective: This study aims to establish the effect of electromagnetic diathermy therapies (e.g., shortwave, microwave, capacitive resistive electric transfer) on pain, function, and quality of life in treating musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: We conducted a systematic review according to the PRISMA statement and Cochrane Handbook 6.3. The protocol has been registered in PROSPERO: CRD42021239466. The search was conducted in PubMed, PEDro, CENTRAL, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Results: We retrieved 13,323 records; 68 studies were included. Many pathologies were treated with diathermy against placebo, as a standalone intervention or alongside other therapies. Most of the pooled studies did not show significant improvements in the primary outcomes. While the analysis of single studies shows several significant results in favour of diathermy, all comparisons considered had a GRADE quality of evidence between low and very low. Conclusions: The included studies show controversial results. Most of the pooled studies present very low quality of evidence and no significant results, while single studies have significant results with a slightly higher quality of evidence (low), highlighting a critical lack of evidence in the field. The results did not support the adoption of diathermy in a clinical context, preferring therapies supported by evidence.
... [15] Capacitiveresistive electromagnetic fields, known as Tecar today, have been used in clinical cases for the last 20 years, and there are systematic studies on their therapeutic effects. [16] Most studies in this field have reported reduced pain and improvement in musculoskeletal disorders, such as back pain [17] and muscle fatigue. [18] Recently, a novel method of TT has been developed, using an innovative mechanism resulting in endorphin release and nervous system improvement. ...
... [29] The basic principles of this protocol, such as parallel placement of electrodes on sides, were based on a previous study. [17] However, this method was applied in the present study due to the effectiveness of capacitive mode on foot pain and tactile sensation. [19] Decrease in tactile and temperature sensations associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy can result in notable complications, including burning pain, paresthesia, and anesthesia. ...
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Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Tecar therapy on neuropathy symptoms and tibial nerve conduction velocity in individuals with diabetes. Patients and methods: The single-blind, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial was conducted between January 2019 and October 2019. Twenty-four type 2 diabetics (8 males, 16 females; mean age: 60.4±8.9 years; range, 40 to 78 years) with peripheral neuropathy were randomly allocated to control (n=12) and study (n=12) groups. The study group received the capacitive Tecar therapy with 10 to 30% intensity and infrared radiation in 10 sessions. The controls received the same protocol with zero intensity. The neuropathy symptoms and nerve conduction velocity were evaluated at baseline, after 10 sessions, and six weeks after the end of sessions. Results: There were no significant differences in variables (p>0.05). In this way, the homogeneity of the data variables was confirmed. Moreover, the results of two-way mixed analysis of variance showed that improvement of neuropathy symptoms in the study group was significantly more than controls in all stages (p<0.001). After 10 sessions, the results of post hoc analysis showed that the neuropathy symptoms and tibial nerve conduction velocity were significantly improved in both groups (p<0.001). The improvements were still present at six weeks in the study group (p<0.05). However, there was no change in these outcomes after six weeks in the control group (p>0.05). Conclusion: Tecar therapy could improve neuropathy symptoms and tibial nerve conduction velocity in diabetic individuals with peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, the use of this method to control the symptoms of diabetic patients can be recommended.
... TECAR is a method that uses a high-frequency alternating current that is administered by using an applicator applied to the skin; otherwise referred to as radiofrequency (RF), thus far it has been most often used in sports, especially after sports injuries for rapid pain relief and smoother regeneration or in the management of lower back pain [17,18], as well as in urology [19]. The effectiveness of the use of radiofrequency in Peyronie's disease (fibrous inelastic scar of the penis) in men has been proven. ...
... However, in their study, only women with a pain VAS of >4 were enrolled [16], whereas in our case, a pain VAS of >1 was assumed. To date, positive effects of TECAR therapy on pain relief after sports injuries or in Peyronie's disease have been observed [17,18]. So far, one review has been published on the use of TECAR in pelvic structural dysfunction [30]. ...
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Perineal pain occurs in 97% of women with episiotomy or first- and second-degree perineal tears on the first day after delivery. The study aimed to assess the impact of capacitive and resistive energy transfer (TECAR) on perineal pain and discomfort in the first two postpartum days. The prospective randomized double-blind study was performed with the pain and discomfort assessment using the Visual Analogue Scale at baseline and after both TECAR interventions. Characteristics data, delivery information, and the number of painkillers taken were collected. The assumed significance level was α < 0.05. The study included 121 women with a mean age of 30.7 ± 4.2 years and a median BMI of 26.1 kg/m2 (24.1; 28.9). Pain reduction at rest, when walking, and discomfort reduction when walking were significantly higher in the TECAR group compared to the sham group (p < 0.05). After the first TECAR intervention, significant reduction in all measured parameters was observed in the study group (p < 0.03), whereas in the control group, it was observed in pain and discomfort while sitting (p < 0.04). The amount of ibuprofen taken on the second day was significantly reduced in the study group compared to the first day (p = 0.004). TECAR has been shown to provide more immediate and significant reduction in perineal pain and discomfort.
... Although other diathermy methods have documented its capacity to reduce pain in patients with numerous degenerative and inflammatory orthopedic problems, such as in low back pain or in shoulder impingement syndrome [21,22], evidence about the use of monopolar dielectric diathermy in knee pain is scarce [23][24][25]. Considering therapeutic knee and hip exercises as the most consistent approach for treating patellofemoral pain syndrome [3,11], and the hypothesis that this technique could promote pain and functional recovery, the purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of adding MDR to a therapeutic exercise protocol versus a therapeutic exercise protocol in the intensity of pain, probability of neuropathic pain, functionality, and range of movement of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. ...
... For all the above, it could be recommended to always use exercise as the first approach for patellofemoral pain syndrome since its effects are more than demonstrated in all the outcome measures. Adding MDR could also be useful, effective, and safe to obtain higher pain reductions and reduce the time of recovery, as it has been shown in various musculoskeletal medical disorders such as sports-type injuries, in low back pain, and in urology [21,[52][53][54]. Due to its thermotherapy implications, the diathermy therapy encourages the therapeutic procedures of wounded tissues without unwanted elevation of skin temperature [20]. ...
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Citation: Albornoz-Cabello, M.; Ibáñez-Vera, A.J.; Barrios-Quinta, C.J.; Lara-Palomo, I.C.; Cardero-Durán, M.d.l.Á.; Espejo-Antúnez, L. Effects of Radiofrequency Diathermy Plus Therapeutic Exercises on Pain and Functionality of Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract: Although consensus has been reached about the use of therapeutic exercise in patellofemoral pain syndrome, several techniques used worldwide such as radiofrequency diathermy could be useful as complementary therapy. The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effects of adding radiofrequency diathermy to therapeutic exercises in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned either to radiofrequency diathermy plus therapeutic exercises group (n = 29) or therapeutic exercises group (n = 27). Both groups received the same therapeutic exercises, and the diathermy group additionally received monopolar dielectric diathermy for three weeks (5-3-2 weekly sessions). Data related to intensity of pain, probability of neuropathic pain, functionality, and range of movement of the knee were measured at baseline and three weeks after the intervention. Comparing pre-treatment and values obtained at the third week, significant improvements were found in intensity of pain, neuropathic pain, functionality, and range of motion in both groups (p < 0.05). The diathermy plus exercises group had significantly better intensity of pain than the control group at the end of the three weeks (p < 0.01). The addition of diathermy by emission of radiofrequency to the therapeutic knee exercise protocol is more effective than a therapeutic exercise protocol alone in the relief of intensity of pain in patients with patellofemoral pain in the immediate post-treatment follow-up compared with baseline scores.
... In our study, the improvement in gastrocnemius hypertonia may be due to the quick action on intramuscular blood flow of both the capacitive and the resistive modes of TT. Additionally, TT improves blood circulation in the peritendinous region [41]. The capacitive mode generates heat in more superficial tissues rich in water, such as the gastrocnemius. ...
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Background: The aim of this study was to assess changes in muscle properties after a single session of capacitive and resistive energetic transfer (TECAR) therapy on spastic gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles in chronic post-stroke. Methods: A total of 36 chronic stroke survivors with lower limb hypertonia were enrolled in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The experimental group (n = 18) received a single 30 min session of TECAR therapy in combination with functional massage (FM) on the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. The control group (n = 18) received a sham treatment of TECAR therapy (without electrical stimulation) in combination with real FM. The primary outcome was muscle tone of the lower limb muscles assessed with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). The secondary outcomes were goniometric degrees of the MAS (goniometer), neuromuscular properties of the gastrocnemius/quadriceps (myotonometer), and passive range of motion (inclinometer). All measurements were performed at baseline (T0), immediately after treatment (T1), and at 30 min post-treatment (T2) by a blinded assessor. Results: The MAS score ankle dorsiflexion significantly decreased at T0-T1 (p = 0.046), and the change was maintained at T0-T2 (p = 0.019) in the experimental group. Significant improvements were noted in the passive range of motion for knee flexion (p = 0.012) and ankle dorsiflexion (p = 0.034) at T2. In addition, knee flexion improved at T1 (p = 0.019). Conclusion: A single session of Tecar therapy at the same time with FM on the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris immediately reduces muscle tone and increases the passive range of motion of both ankle and knee in chronic stroke survivors. There were no significant changes in the neuromuscular properties measured with myotonometer.
... The proposed mechanism of action is an increase in blood flow caused by the thermal effect, which results in a healing process that decreases pain and improves function in MSD. 34 Although the literature is scarce in clinical studies about the efficacy of this treatment, some promising results are present, 35 which indicates that this technique should be further evaluated. ...
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Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a crucial issue in current literature due to their impact on physical function, social, and economic costs. Rehabilitation plays a pivotal role in the therapeutic management of these disabling conditions with growing evidence underlining positive effects in improving functional outcomes. However, to date, several questions are still open about the mechanisms underpinning functional improvements while recent research is now focusing on a deeper understanding of the biophysical processes underpinning the macroscopical effects of these treatments. Thus, this narrative review aims at providing a comprehensive overview about the state of the art of biophysical dimensions of currently available treatments for MSD. PubMed, Scopus, CENTRAL, PEDro, and Web of Science were searched between March 2022 and October 2022 for in vitro and in vivo studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis addressing the issue of biophysics-based approach in rehabilitation of MSD. Our findings showed that a biophysical approach might be integrated into regenerative rehabilitation, aiming at enhancing regenerative processes by mechanical and biophysical stimuli. In addition, a biophysical-based approach has been proposed to improve knowledge about several instrumental physical therapies, including shock wave therapies, low-level laser therapy, ultrasound, short-wave diathermy, electrical stimulation, pulsed electromagnetic field, and vibration therapy. In accordance, emerging research is now focusing on the biophysical properties of several medical procedures to improve pain management in patients with MSD. Taken together, our results showed promising results of the integration of a biophysical-based approach in rehabilitation, albeit several limitations currently limit its implementation in routine clinical setting. Unfortunately, the state of the art is still inconclusive, and the low quality of clinical studies based on the biophysical approach did not provide clear treatment protocols. Further studies are needed to promote a precise rehabilitation approach targeting biological modification and enhancing the functional improvement of patients with MSDs.
... The two modes of TECAR therapy are resistive and capacitive, both of which are utilized for their therapeutic properties [12]. Research evidence suggests that the application of TECAR therapy on the lumbar area improves pain, disability, and range of motion in individuals with CNSLBP [12,13] as well as amplifying the therapeutic benefits of exercise [14]. Modern TECAR devices allow with the use of special electrodes the simultaneous application of TECAR with manual techniques or therapeutic exercise since they turn the hand of the physical therapist into an electrode, providing the possibility of a more dynamic treatment. ...
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Background: Chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) is defined as back pain that lasts longer than 12 weeks. Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of manual therapy (MT) program combined with Capacitive and Resistive Electric Transfer (TECAR) therapy in individuals with CNSLBP. Method: Sixty adults with CNSLBP were randomly equally divided into three groups. The first group followed an MT protocol in the lumbar region (MT group), the second group followed the same MT protocol combined with TECAR therapy (MT + TECAR group) using a conventional capacitive electrode as well as a special resistive electrode bracelet and the third group (Control group) received no treatment. Both intervention programs included six treatments over two weeks. Pain in the last 24 hours with the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), functional ability with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) in the lumbar region with pressure algometry, and mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region through fingertip-to-floor distance (FFD) test were evaluated before and after the intervention period with a one-month follow-up. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was applied. Results: In the NPRS score, both intervention groups showed statistically significant differences compared to the control group both in the second week as well as in the one-month follow-up (p < .001). Between-groups differences were also noticed between the two intervention groups in the second week (p < .05). Differences in the RMDQ score in the second week and on the one-month follow-up were detected between the intervention groups and the control group (p < .001), while differences between the two intervention groups were only detected in the one-month follow-up (p < .001). Regarding the PPT values, differences were found mainly between the MT + TECAR and the control group and between the MT + TECAR and the MT group (p < .05), with the MT + TECAR group in most cases showing the greatest improvement compared to the other two groups, which remained statistically significant in the one-month follow-up (p < .05). Finally, both intervention groups improved the mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region in both time points compared to the control group without, however, statistically significant differences between them (p> .05). Conclusion: The application of an MT protocol with TECAR therapy appeared more effective than conventional MT as well as compared to the control group in reducing pain and disability and improving PPT in individuals with CNSLBP. No further improvement was noted in mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region by adding TECAR to the MT intervention.
... The two modes of TECAR therapy are resistive and capacitive, both of which are utilized for their therapeutic properties [12]. Research evidence suggests that the application of TECAR therapy on the lumbar area improves pain, disability, and range of motion in individuals with CNSLBP [12,13] as well as amplifies the therapeutic benefits of exercise [14]. Modern TECAR devices allow, with the use of special electrodes, the simultaneous application of TECAR with manual techniques or therapeutic exercise since they transform the hand of the physical therapist into an electrode, providing the possibility of a more dynamic treatment. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objectives: Chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) is defined as back pain that lasts longer than 12 weeks. Capacitive and resistive electric transfer (TECAR) therapy utilizes radiant energy to generate endogenous heat and is widely used for the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of manual therapy (MT) program combined with TECAR therapy in individuals with CNSLBP. Materials and Methods: Sixty adults with CNSLBP were randomly divided equally into three groups. The first group followed an MT protocol in the lumbar region (MT group), the second group followed the same MT protocol combined with TECAR therapy (MT + TECAR group) using a conventional capacitive electrode as well as a special resistive electrode bracelet, and the third group (control group) received no treatment. Both intervention programs included six treatments over two weeks. Pain in the last 24 h with the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), functional ability with the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the lumbar region with pressure algometry, and mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region through fingertip-to-floor distance (FFD) test were evaluated before and after the intervention period with a one-month follow-up. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was applied. Results: In the NPRS score, both intervention groups showed statistically significant differences compared to the control group both during the second week and the one-month follow-up (p < 0.001). Between-group differences were also noticed between the two intervention groups in the second week (p < 0.05). Differences in the RMDQ score were detected between the intervention groups and the control group in the second week and at the one-month follow-up (p < 0.001), while differences between the two intervention groups were only detected at the one-month follow-up (p < 0.001). Regarding the PPT values, differences were found mainly between the MT + TECAR group and the control group and between the MT + TECAR group and the MT group (p < 0.05), with the MT + TECAR group in most cases showing the greatest improvement compared to the other two groups, which remained statistically significant at the one-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Finally, both intervention groups improved the mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region at both time points compared to the control group without, however, statistically significant differences between them (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The application of an MT protocol with TECAR therapy appeared more effective than conventional MT as well as compared to the control group in reducing pain and disability and improving PPT in individuals with CNSLBP. No further improvement was noted in the mobility of the lumbo-pelvic region by adding TECAR to the MT intervention.
... The latter is based on the application of electrical currents within a specific radio frequency, resulting in a steady increase in the temperature of the deep tissues (45). It is commonly used nowadays in physical rehabilitation due to its ability to reduce pain (46) and increase blood flow (47). ...
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This article presents the case of a 32-year-old woman with two distinct temporomandibular joint pathologies: right temporomandibular joint arthralgia, headache, disc displacement with reduction and intermittent locking, and limited opening, whereas the left temporomandibular joint was showing arthralgia and subluxation. A neurologist was regularly consulted and treated the patient for migraine. A detailed clinical assessment was used in the therapeutic approach. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the paraclinical assessment to evaluate the temporomandibular joint (TMJ); CBCT imaging revealed condylar bone changes that were not correlated with the clinical symptoms. To alleviate TMJ symptoms, the treatment plan included anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy and an occlusal splint with lateral guiding ramps. After three months of anti-inflammatory medication, physiotherapy and splint wear, an improvement in the migraine symptoms and enhanced life quality was reported. The variation in pathology between the right and left joints and the extended history of temporomandibular disorder onset with no definitive diagnosis or therapy make this case unique.
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