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Abstract

To compare the effectiveness of Doctor Tecar Therapy™ with that of laser therapy in the management of low back pain (LBP), a total of 60 patients with LBP were enrolled. The participants were randomly divided into two groups: a Tecar group (experimental group, 30 subjects), and a laser group (control group, 30 subjects). AH the subjects received 10 sessions of therapy: one each day from Monday to Friday and the same again the following week. All the subjects were evaluated for pain (VAS) and disability (Roland and Morris score and Oswestry score) at baseline (TO), and 2 weeks (T1), 1 month (T2) and 2 months (T3) after the end of treatment. The pain and disability presented a trend to improvement over time in both groups. This improvement was statistically significant at all follow-ups (FUs) in the Tecar group but only at T1 for the Laser group (p<0.01). Comparing the two methods, there emerged a significant difference in favour of the Tecar group at T2 and T3 (p<0.01). The results show that Tecar therapy determined significant improvement already by the end of the treatment. Moreover, at the first and second month FUs, the Tecar therapy showed statistically better results than laser therapy.
... This study also demonstrated that, in isolation, PBM decreases the intensity of pain (p = 0.004 and d = 0.88), disability (p = 0.024 and d = 0.64), and the level of cortisol (p = 0.029 and d = 0.62), corroborating with the studies by Notarnicola et al. (2017) [30] that compared the efficacy of Doctor Tecar Therapy™ and laser therapy in the treatment of low back pain and found that both groups achieved significant improvements over time (2, 4, 10 weeks) for pain and disability (p ≤ 0.05 in both variables). Zagatto et al. ...
... This study also demonstrated that, in isolation, PBM decreases the intensity of pain (p = 0.004 and d = 0.88), disability (p = 0.024 and d = 0.64), and the level of cortisol (p = 0.029 and d = 0.62), corroborating with the studies by Notarnicola et al. (2017) [30] that compared the efficacy of Doctor Tecar Therapy™ and laser therapy in the treatment of low back pain and found that both groups achieved significant improvements over time (2, 4, 10 weeks) for pain and disability (p ≤ 0.05 in both variables). Zagatto et al. ...
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Photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) is often used to treat musculoskeletal disorders such as chronic non-specific low back pain (NSCLBP) as it can have positive effects on biomarkers—creatine kinase (CK) and serum cortisol levels—related to stress caused by physical exercise, such as deep water running (DWR) or by pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the combination of PBM and aquatic exercise (DWR) on the intensity of pain, disability, 6-min walk test adapted (6WTA), and on cortisol and creatine kinase (CK) levels in a population with NSCLBP. The participants were allocated into three groups: TGPBM (Photobiomodulation and Training Group), TGPLA (Placebo Photobiomodulation and Training Group), and the GPBM (Photobiomodulation Group). Information regarding anthropometric data, blood pressure, and heart rate were collected, and the questionnaires were applied: IPAQ-Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Visual Analog Scale for Pain. The submaximal exercise test (6WTA) was performed. Blood was collected for analysis of cortisol and CK levels. The training sessions were performed twice a week, for 4 weeks. In the intragroup comparisons, there were statistically significant changes in the TGPBM and GPBM groups in the outcomes pain intensity, disability (reductions in both groups), and in cortisol (increased in the TGPBM and reduced in the GPBM); in the TGPLA group, there was a statistically significant reduction only in the outcome of pain intensity. In the intergroup comparison, in the comparison between TGPBM and TGPLA, there was a statistically significant difference in the level of cortisol, as well as in the comparison between TGPBM and GPBM, in which there was a statistically significant difference for this same outcome (cortisol) and for the 6WTA outcome. The effects of the combination of PBM and aquatic exercise have positive effects on reducing pain intensity, disability, and cortisol levels, but its effects on other variables (6WTA and CK) are too small to be considered significant. Trial registration number: NCT03465228—April 3, 2019; retrospectively registered (ClinicalTrials.gov).
... Public Health 2021, 18, 12446 2 of 17 delivered at 570 kHz, however, CRET has been shown to have cytostatic and cytotoxic qualities in neuroblastomas [4], additionally demonstrating at this frequency cytostatic effects in hepatocarcinoma, and biomarkers indications of a variation of malignancy and cell differentiation, suggesting CRET treatment may guide hepatocarcinoma cells towards hepatic cell normal state [5]. In addition to these in vitro effects, other physiological effects of applying CRET were observed, such as increased skin surface temperature and at a greater depth, a temporary increase in intramuscular and topical blood flow [6], enhanced execution of functional movements [7], and reduced pain, making it a useful tool for rehabilitation [8,9]. ...
... Notarnicola et al. [8] reported differences in the treatment of low back pain when comparing CRET with laser, highlighting a significant improvement in favour of CRET at 1 and 2 months after treatment. Improvements were shown in pain reduction (measured with a visual analogue scale) and reduced physical disability (measured with the Roland-Morris questionnaire and the Oswestry disability index). ...
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Abstract: Diathermy techniques embody an oscillating electrical current passaging through the body tissues generating therapeutic heat; use of this technique in the physiotherapy field has been introduced recently, and because there is scarce information, the following review is proposed, aiming to explore the available evidence on applying CRET in physiotherapy clinical practice and sports. A systematic search was led through a keyword search on PubMed, MedLine, DialNet, Scopus, PEDro, Web of Science and Clinicaltrials databases. Including randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies, which applied radiofrequency diathermy in sports and physiotherapy fields, without any restrictions on dates, published in Spanish, English, Portuguese or Italian. Data extraction was conducted through the Cochrane data extraction form and presented in tabular format; 30 articles were included for analysis, and assessment of methodological quality was made through the PEDro scale with a “Good/Fair” general quality score. The nature of existing articles does not allow a quantitative analysis. Conclusion: identified fields of applications were musculoskeletal physiotherapy, treatment of pelvic floor and sexual dysfunctions, as well as dermato-functional physiotherapy and sports, evidencing an increase of skin temperature, enhanced skin and muscle blood perfusion, as well as reporting an increase in oxyhaemoglobin. Further research is needed. Prospero registration number: CRD42020215592.
... To reduce the forces applied to the damaged ligament, a cane is used to repair and walk with low weight-bearing. Also, physiotherapy treatments, such as ultrasound, infrared radiation, friction massage, tens, deep sensation stimulation exercises, and strengthening the muscles around the ankle motions are used [2,16,17]. ...
... Al-Mandeel and Watson in a de-tailed review of the records of patients who used pulsed short-wave diathermy found that this modality can be used in pain management, fracture healing, accelerated healing, and absorption of edema, and muscle hematoma plays a key role in that case [30]. Their results were also consistent with the results obtained by Notarnicola et al. in 2017 [17] after the assessment of 60 patients with low back pain. In this study, patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 cases and each group received the therapeutic intervention for two weeks (10 sessions in total). ...
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Background and Objectives: Tecar therapy as a modality has been considered due to its reported effects on reducing pain and swelling and finally increasing range of motion and improving function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tecar therapy on acute symptoms of athletes following lateral ankle ligament sprain in the treatment and control groups between pre-treatment periods, after 6 sessions, and after 12 sessions of treatment. Methods: In this study, 23 patients in each group including athletes with an acute lateral ankle ligament sprain in the acute stage in Tehran. The participant of this study were divided into 2 groups of control with normal treatment and the second group with normal treatment + tecar treatment. Participants were homogenized in terms of age, height, weight, and level of exercise. To evaluate the pain intensity of patients in the two groups and to measure the swelling of the ankle joint, a tape measure (mm) was used. A goniometer was used to measure the degree of ankle motions. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) questionnaire was also used to collect data. Results: Statistical analyzes showed that the mean numerical visual criterion of pain in both groups was significantly lower after 6 and 12 sessions of treatment (P
... The clinical effects of diathermy are well documented, however there is a lack of clinical evidence from high-quality studies; Tecar therapy represents the technological evolution of diathermy [26][27][28]. Although Tecar has been widely used in physical therapy practise as a physical therapy agent for almost 20 years, there are only a few studies that have investigated its clinical efficacy [11,29]. ...
Article
Background: Over the last 20 years, both diathermy and ultrasound have been popular choices for many clinicians in treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, there is a lack of clinical evidence of deep heating modalities to treat tendon pathology, There is no study to investigate the effects of such as physical modalities on morphological and elastic properties on the human tendons. Objective: the objective of the present study was to compare the effects of diathermy and ultrasound therapies on cross sectional area, transversal height and hardness percentage of the non-insertional region of the Achilles tendon in able-bodied subjects. Methods: healthy volunteers were divided in diathermy and ultrasound group received six 15-min treatment sessions. Before and after treatment a sonographic assessment was conducted by mean of ultrasonography and the following parameters were recorded: cross sectional area, transversal height and hardness percentage. Results: thirty-two subjects were enrolled. Between-group comparisons showed a significant change on hardness percentage (p = 0.004) after treatment in diathermy therapy group. Within-group comparison showed a significant improvement in the hardness percentage for the diathermy (p = 0.001) and ultrasound (p = 0.046) after two weeks of treatment. Conclusion: this pilot study demonstrated larger effects on morphological and elastic properties of the non-insertional region of the Achilles tendon after diathermy than ultrasound therapy in normal tendons. Diathermy may be a useful deep heat modality for treating non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy.
... Few recent studies evaluate its clinical efficacy despite being common practice for the last 20 years [36]. Current studies report promising results in terms of pain reduction and improved function in musculoskeletal pathologies (such as low back pain) [37] and tendinopathies (such as plantar fasciitis) [38][39][40]. ...
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Background Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a multifactorial disorder that affects 5.7% to 26.6% of women and 2.2% to 9.7% of men, characterized by hypersensitivity of the central and peripheral nervous system affecting bladder and genital function. People with CPPS have much higher rates of psychological disorders (anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing) that increase the severity of chronic pain and worsen quality of life. Myofascial therapy, manual therapy, and treatment of trigger points are proven therapeutic options for this syndrome. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of capacitive resistive monopolar radiofrequency (CRMRF) at 448 kHz as an adjunct treatment to other physiotherapeutic techniques for reducing pain and improving the quality of life of patients with CPPS. Methods This triple-blind (1:1) randomized controlled trial will include 80 women and men with CPPS. Participants will be randomized into a CRMRF activated group or a CRMRF deactivated group and receive physiotherapeutic techniques and pain education. The groups will undergo treatment for 10 consecutive weeks. At the beginning of the trial there will be an evaluation of pain intensity (using VAS), quality of life (using the SF-12), kinesiophobia (using the TSK-11), and catastrophism (using the PCS), as well as at the sixth and tenth sessions. Discussion The results of this study will show that CRMRF benefits the treatment of patients with CPPS, together with physiotherapeutic techniques and pain education. These results could offer an alternative conservative treatment option for these patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03797911. Registered on 8 January 2019.
... The capacitive method is used to act on superficial tissues with low-resistant muscles and nerves, while the resistive method for high-resistant deep tissues such as bone [21]. Despite few studies on the therapeutic effects of capacitive or resistive electromagnetic waves [22], most studies have reported reduced pain and improved function in musculoskeletal lesions such as low back pain [23], Achilles tendinopathy, and patellar tendonitis [24]. The physiological mechanisms of this modality are cellular regeneration, increased metabolic rate, and decreased pain with the release of endorphins [25]. ...
Article
Objective: Because of the significant prevalence of diabetes, disability of patients due to the complication of Diabeti Neuropathy (DN) has been increased. Physiotherapy is one of the methods for DN which can help control the symptoms through modalities such as infrared radiation, electrical stimulation and electromagnetic fields. Tecar therapy is a form of electromagnetic fields.This study investigated the effect of Capacitive Tecar therapy on pain and tactile sensation of the feet in type 2 diabetics with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Materials & Methods: This clinical trial was performed as pre-test and post-test with a control group. The samples consisted of 24 diabetics aged 17-78 years with symtoms of peripheral neuropathy allocated in the control and experimental group randomly. The patients of experimental groups participated in 10 sessions and received the Capasitive tecar therapy with 10%-30% intensity in addition to infrared radiatin; the controls received the same protocol with zero intensity of tecar. Pain and tactile sensation of the soles were evaluated before and after sessions. The collected data were analyzed by the Reapeted measure Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA). All statistical analyses were performed in SPSS V. 18. The significance level was set at P
... However, the complex physiopathology of PFPS requires more studies in order to confirm whether or not improved clinical benefits can be achieved by combining this treatment with taping and knee exercises. Considering previous studies in patients with musculoskeletal conditions, such as supraspinatus tendinopathy [32] and lower back pain [33], using distinct types of diathermy by emission of radiofrequency, we can consider this technique to be valid in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain and joint function. ...
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Background and Objectives: Notwithstanding patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) being one of the most common causes of pain in the front of the knee in outpatients, few studies have shown the effects of radiofrequency on knee pain and function in this population. The aim of the present study was to determine whether outpatients diagnosed with PFPS obtained improvement in pain and function after treatment by dynamic application of monopolar dielectric diathermy by emission of radiofrequency (MDR). Materials and Methods: An experimental study was conducted with 27 subjects with PFPS. Subjects were treated with 10 sessions of MDR in dynamic application. The visual analogue scale (VAS), the Kujala scale, the DN4 questionnaire, the lower extremity function scale (LEFS), the range of movement (ROM) in knee flexion and extension and the daily drug intake were measured pre-and post-intervention and at the time of the follow-up (six months). Results: Statistically significant differences were found in pain perception (VAS: F1,26 = 92.43, p < 0.000, ŋ 2 = 0.78 and DN4: F1.26 = 124.15, p < 0.000, ŋ 2 = 0.82), as well as improvements in functionality (LEFS: F1.26 = 72.42, p < 0.000, ŋ 2 = 0.74 and Kujala: F1.26 = 40.37, p < 0.000, ŋ 2 = 0.61]) and in ROM (Flexion: F1.26 = 63.15, p < 0.000, ŋ 2 = 0.71). No statistically significant changes in drug intake were found. Conclusions: The present study shows that the dynamic application of MDR seems effective in reducing pain and increasing functionality and knee flexion in patients with PFPS, after a follow-up of six months.
Article
Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant, capacitive resistive monopolar radiofrequency (CRMRF, INDIBA) treatment at 448 kHz together with physiotherapeutic techniques compared to a sham treatment with the same techniques, for pain reduction and quality of life (QoL) improvements in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). Methods: A triple-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) including patients with CPPS randomly allocated (1:1) to a CRMRF-activated group (intervention) or a CRMRF-deactivated one (control). Both groups received physiotherapeutic techniques and pain education weekly for 10 consecutive weeks. Data from a visual analogical scale and the SF-12 questionnaire were collected at trial commencement and repeated at the 5th and 10th sessions. Pain intensity was considered the main outcome. For the comparisons between variables, the χ2 and Student's t test were used. Superiority was analyzed by estimating the mean change (95% confidence interval). Analysis was performed for the per-protocol and the intention-to-treat populations. The statistical significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: Eighty-one patients were included (67.9% women) with a mean age of 43.6 years (SD 12.9). CRMRF lessened pain scores by more than 2 points and improved QoL by 5 points. There were no relevant side effects and overall adherence to the treatment was 86.4%. Conclusions: This is the first RCT that evaluates the efficacy of CRMRF (INDIBA) compared to a sham treatment, and demonstrates its superiority in decreasing pain and improving QoL. Such results may lead to greater prescribing of CRMRF when treating CPPS patients.
Chapter
Capacitive and resistive electric transfer (TECAR) modes of therapy use radiant energy to generate endogenous heat and are used for musculoskeletal disorders for their analgesic, decontracting, and elasticizing properties. While the capacitive mode is supposed to interact with soft tissues, the resistive mode interacts more with hard tissues. This study aims to investigate whether the successive order of the two modes during their application could make a difference concerning the outcome. The study included 40 patients affected by chronic non-specific low back pain. Patients were assessed using algometry, before and immediately after the therapeutic intervention, and thermal imaging, before, immediately after, and then 30 and 60 min after the intervention. Each patient had two TECAR interventions on different days of a total of 20 min each, with a resistive followed by capacitive mode and conversely, capacitive followed by resistive mode. The capacitive mode alternated with the resistive mode by 10 min during either intervention. Results showed that the effects consisting of temporary increases in the superficial temperature of the lower back and pressure pain threshold were alike for both interventions. We conclude that TECAR therapy reduces low back pain regardless of the operative mode adopted, with only an insignificant advantage when starting the sequence from the resistive application.
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Background: Long-term clinical practice has found that there are still some deficiencies in freehand joint loosening. Due to the therapist's lack of anatomical knowledge and treatment experience, and incorrect wrist joints, wrist and other parts of the force during the treatment, the incidence of wrist and lower back pain produced by the therapist has significantly increased. The purpose of the feasibility study is to observe the effects of spinal mobilization apparatus combined with sling exercise training on pain and muscle fatigue in patients with non-specific low back pain. Methods: This pilot study will recruit 82 eligible patients with non-specific lower back pain from Ningbo Rehabilitation Hospital. Patients who are re-elected to this study will be randomly assigned to the intervention group in a 1:1 ratio to receive spinal mobilization apparatus and sling exercise training on top of completing conventional rehabilitation therapy, while the control group will receive sling exercise training on top of conventional rehabilitation therapy. Primary and secondary indicators were tested at the 0-week, 8-week and 3-month follow-up phases, respectively. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale was used for the primary observation and the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, core group endurance test (CET) for the secondary indicators, intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), surface electromyographic (SMEG) measurement of core muscle fatigue, musculoskeletal ultrasound measurement of diaphragm thickness (DT), range of motion (ROM) and the activity of daily life (ADL). Discussion: This pilot study will determine the feasibility of conducting a full randomized controlled trial protocol to assess the effectiveness of spinal mobilization apparatus combined with sling exercise training compared to sling exercise training alone in improving low back pain and muscle fatigue in patients with non-specific lower back pain, providing preliminary clinical evidence of the efficacy of the combined therapy in improving low back pain and muscle fatigue in patients with non-specific lower back pain. Trial registration: This trial was first registered on Chinese Clinical Trial Register, ChiCTR2100042333 on 19 January 2021.
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