Conference Paper

Information Radiators – Using large screens and small devices to support awareness in urban space

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Abstract

Information radiators are ubiquitous stationary installations that radiate information that is likely to improve awareness of passers-by in semi-public environments like organization floors. In this paper, we present the idea of using several kinds of information radiators for enhancing urban participation of seniors - by providing awareness for supporting the planning and execution of activities in public environments. We motivate the idea and discuss interaction design as well as HCI challenges to be addressed in future work.1

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... lamp posts or park benches). The radiators interact with the seniors through LED lights, sound or vibration [12]. Connecting several information radiatorsmicro and macro -enables guidance by navigation and support of activities over a wide area (see gure 1 for examples). ...
... Thus, micro information radiators need to provide a multi-user functionality. Figure 1 displays example scenarios for a connected and multi-user functional network [12]. Nevertheless, the usage of micro information radiators by several users is restricted as only one output can be displayed at the same time. ...
Conference Paper
Senior citizens face challenges during activities in urban space. To help and motivate them pursuing outside activities, we propose a network of (micro and macro) information radiators to increase their feeling of safety. In this paper we first collect guidelines and relevant aspects for the design of micro information radiators. Then we summarize our own experiences from a project designing smart urban objects - particularly giving an overview of design guidelines for input and output interaction of micro information radiators.
... In diesem Beitrag beschreiben wir unsere Planung für ein System, welches basierend auf Gamification-Prinzipien dazu beitragen soll, dass Senioren über Angebote aller Art in ihrem städtischen Umfeld informiert werden, mit Hilfe von externen Anreizen zur Wahrnehmung dieser Angebote motiviert werden, und bei der sicheren Durchführung der Aktivität so weit wie möglich unterstützt werden. Das hier beschriebene Vorhaben basiert auf weiteren Projektergebnissen von Urb-anLife+, worunter nicht nur die Anforderungsanalyse fällt, sondern auch die Pläne für Tests mit vernetzten smarten urbanen Objekten [3], insbesondere Informationsstrahlern [15], sowie Assistenzsystemen zur seniorengerechten Navigation (noch nicht veröffentlicht). ...
... Eines der übergreifenden Ziele von UrbanLife+ ist, direkte Interaktion möglichst mit den smarten urbanen Objekten zu erlauben und den Einsatz von persönlichen Geräten auf das nötige Minimum zu beschränken. Unter den Objekten in UrbanLife+ sind die großen Informationsstrahler [15] am besten geeignet, die nötigen grafischen und textuellen Informationen anzuzeigen. Bei den Geräten handelt es sich um interaktive Wandbildschirme. ...
Conference Paper
Im Rahmen des Verbundprojektes UrbanLife+ verfolgen wir einen Gamification-Ansatz, nach dem das spielerische Gestaltungsmittel der Quest als Grundlage dafür verwendet wird, Senioren zur Teilhabe an ihrem urbanen Umfeld zu motivieren, indem ihnen konkrete Vorschläge für Aktivitäten gemacht werden, welche mit einem Belohnungssystem verbunden sind. Das Gesamtsystem befindet sich derzeit noch in der Entwurfsphase. Eine Analyse der Anforderungen der Zielgruppe einschließlich einer umfassenden Befragung ist im Rahmen des Gesamtprojekts erfolgt. Dieser Beitrag beschreibt den aktuellen Planungsstand des Gamification-Systems sowie die dafür unmittelbar relevanten sonstigen Projektergebnisse und diskutiert die Herangehensweise.
... ith regard to the digitalization of the urban environment, commonly referred to as Smart City, recent efforts in this area are now focusing on an increasingly ageing population. The latest findings will be described in [1] in this context. So-called smart urban objects can be used in public areas to increase the sense of security of older people, which can enhance their participation in public life. ...
... So-called smart urban objects can be used in public areas to increase the sense of security of older people, which can enhance their participation in public life. In [1] an information radiator is presented as a typical member of a smart urban object whose task is to boost the feeling of well-being by means of a tailored information supply for elderly people. W As another typical representative of a smart urban object, this work realizes a lighting system which aims to increase the feeling of security in this environment by a personalized adaptation of the light. ...
... The concept and the individual parts of our system have been discussed in prior publications, specifically about the requirements analysis and the technical architecture [5], the persuasive design aspect anchored in the gamification research landscape [4], and more detailed guidance on the interaction design of small [16] and large public displays [8] as relevant to this kind of design. The following section nonetheless gives a short design overview. ...
Conference Paper
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Seniors face many challenges in their daily activities regarding mobility and accessibility. We have designed and prototyped a system of networked public displays to support them, particularly regarding outdoor pedestrian navigation. This article describes the process and results of a qualitative evaluation of this prototype system, which was conducted with seven participants, a mixture of older adults and experts on geriatric care. Based on insights gained from these interviews, we provide guidance on the design of outdoor activity support systems for seniors.
... • Information radiators: a class of devices that broadcast ambient information visually, ranging from large touch screens to small LED information devices (Koch et al., 2017) • Adaptive lights: public light installations that can adjust their color and brightness according to user preference or other pertinent criteria • Smart park benches: public benches for seating that are outfitted with sensors and actuators to facilitate e.g. advance reservation or subtle nudges to remind users to make room for approaching seniors (Hubl, 2019;Hubl et al., 2018) Skowron et al. (2019 provide an overview and categorization method for the SUO design space. ...
Conference Paper
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During outside activities, elderly people encounter different challenges than young people. Those difficulties impede their motivation to pursue outside activities. To counter this problem from a human-computer interaction perspective, we propose a support system for seniors to improve their motivation and subjective safety while undertaking outside activities by coordinating smart urban objects. Drawing from an extensive empirical requirements analysis, we identify typical barriers experienced by seniors for which networked smart urban objects may provide assistance. We discuss a conceptual description of an activity support system: the system aggregates user profile data with information about the urban space to suggest possible activities, the elderly user chooses an activity and receives navigational assistance to increase their motivation and feeling of safety while undertaking the chosen activity. Finally, we discuss our approach regarding challenges such as user autonomy, privacy and real-world deployments, which need to be considered in future implementation and evaluation phases of the system.
... Consequently, a public display cannot provide an optimal interaction at all time, which in turn hinders its citizen participation purpose. The challenge of the adaptation of public displays to such a changing environment has been underlined in the literature [3,38], and some previous work has focused on the adaptation of public displays according to one or several context factors. A well-know example is proxemic interaction [7,28] that adapts the content shown and the features according to the distance between the user and the display. ...
Conference Paper
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In recent years, public displays have been studied as a way to foster citizen participation. However, their surroundings and users are prone to high variability, which makes it tedious to accommodate different contexts with an optimal participation experience. In this paper, we propose adaptive public displays as a lead for solution in tackling this issue. From a review of the motivators and barriers affecting citizen's interaction with public displays we defined a process model destined to serve as a guide for designers of such systems.
... These deployments are increasingly making a transition from static ''broadcast'' displays to interactive ones (e.g. Koch et al. 2017 introduce the hybrid concept of information ''radiators''-broadcasting to, and interacting with users). This transition to interactive displays, where members of the public are empowered to control and use the display, has opened a range of new research challenges and at the same time has broadened the design space for public displays. ...
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We introduce HotCity, a city-wide social context crowdsourcing platform that utilises user’s current location and geo-tagged social data (e.g., check-ins, “likes” and ratings) to autonomously obtain insight on a city’s tacit social awareness (e.g., “when is best time and where to go out on a Saturday night?”). HotCity is available as a mobile application for Android and as an interactive application on pervasive large displays, showcasing a heatmap of social buzz. We present the results of an in-the-field evaluation with 30 volunteers, of which 27 are tourists of the mobile app, compare it to a previous evaluation of the pervasive display app and also present usage data of free use of the pervasive display app over 3 years in the city of Oulu, Finland. Our data demonstrate that HotCity can communicate effectively the city’s current social buzz, without affecting digital maps’ cartography information. Our empirical analysis highlights a change in tourists’ foci when exploring the city using HotCity. We identify a transition from “individual [places]” to “good [areas]” and “people [choices]”. Our contributions are threefold: a long-term deployment of a city-wide social context crowdsourcing platform; an in-the-field evaluation of HotCity on mobile devices and pervasive displays; and an evaluation of cities’ tacit knowledge as social context as a denominator in city planning and for the development of future mobile social-aware applications.
... The survey is part of a larger research project and survey concerned with the social participation of older adults. This project develops and evaluates innovative IT artifacts that assist older adults in their outdoor activities through providing information about the urban environment (Koch et al. 2017). Because the current study is cross-sectional, making causal claims from the empirical data is challenging. ...
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Older adults increasingly use IT to maintain social relationships and pursue an active lifestyle. IT use can also impact older adults' outdoor activities but has received less attention in the literature. Empirical research is inconclusive on whether IT use facilitates older adults' outdoor activities. We propose a research model that contextualizes activity theory of aging within the outdoor environment to explain the role of IT use. We report on designing a questionnaire-based survey, which we validated in a pretest with four groups of participants. This study is expected to have implications for IS research and the design of IT services and community programs assisting older adults in outdoor activities.
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