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The Art of Being a Failure as an Academic Field: A Cautionary Tale for Family Science

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... Finally, family scientists are no strangers to advocacy. As members of a relatively young discipline, family scientists must constantly explain who they are, what they do, why their work has value, and why they should exist as family scientists rather than be subsumed within other disciplines (Gavazzi, 2013;Gavazzi et al., 2014;Hamon & Smith, 2014). This need to advocate for our field and its value is part and parcel of being a family scientist. ...
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The merger phenomenon in higher education
  • J Lawlor
  • E Boyle
Lawlor, J., & Boyle, E. (2007). The merger phenomenon in higher education. In Contemporary corporate strategies, J. Saee (Ed.), pp. 131-138. New York: Routledge. Family Science Review, Volume 18, Issue 2, 2013
Leadership development and mentoring
  • E A References Anderson
References Anderson, E. A. (2013). Leadership development and mentoring. National Council on Family Relations Report, Summer, 3.