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Oral supplementation with specific bioactive collagen peptides improves nail growth and reduces symptoms of brittle nails

Authors:
  • Hexsel Dermatologic Clinics

Abstract

Background: Brittle nail syndrome is a common problem among women and refers to nails that exhibit surface roughness, raggedness, and peeling. Aim: The goal of this study was to investigate whether daily oral supplementation with collagen peptides alleviates the symptoms of brittle nails and improves nail growth rate. Methods: In this open-label, single-center trial, 25 participants took 2.5 g of specific bioactive collagen peptides (BCP, VERISOL(®) ) once daily for 24 weeks followed by a 4-week off-therapy period. Nail growth rate and the frequency of cracked and/or chipped nails as well as an evaluation of symptoms and global clinical improvement score of brittle nails were assessed by a physician during treatment and 4 weeks after discontinuation. Results: Bioactive collagen peptides treatment promoted an increase of 12% nail growth rate and a decrease of 42% in the frequency of broken nails. Additionally, 64% of participants achieved a global clinical improvement in brittle nails, and 88% of participants experienced an improvement 4 weeks post-treatment. The majority of participants (80%) agreed that the use of BCP improved their nails' appearance, and were completely satisfied with the performance of the treatment. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the daily ingestion of BCP increased nail growth and improved brittle nails in conjunction with a notable decrease in the frequency of broken nails.
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Oral supplementation with specific bioactive collagen
peptides improves nail growth and reduces symptoms of
brittle nails
Doris Hexsel MD
1
|
Vivian Zague PhD
2
|
Michael Schunck PhD
3
|
Carolina Siega
BSc
1
|
Fernanda O Camozzato MD
1
|
Steffen Oesser PhD
3
1
Brazilian Center for Studies in
Dermatology, Porto Algre, Brazil
2
Department of Cell and Developmental
Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences,
University of S~
ao Paulo, S~
ao Paulo, Brazil
3
Collagen Research Institute (CRI), Kiel,
Germany
Correspondence
Dr. Doris Hexsel, Brazilian Center for
Studies in Dermatology, Porto Algre, Brazil.
Email: doris@hexsel.com.br
Summary
Background: Brittle nail syndrome is a common problem among women and refers
to nails that exhibit surface roughness, raggedness, and peeling.
Aim: The goal of this study was to investigate whether daily oral supplementation
with collagen peptides alleviates the symptoms of brittle nails and improves nail
growth rate.
Methods: In this open-label, single-center trial, 25 participants took 2.5 g of specific
bioactive collagen peptides (BCP, VERISOL
â
) once daily for 24 weeks followed by a 4-
week off-therapy period. Nail growth rate and the frequency of cracked and/or
chipped nails as well as an evaluation of symptoms and global clinical improvement
score of brittle nails were assessed by a physician during treatment and 4 weeks after
discontinuation.
Results: Bioactive collagen peptides treatment promoted an increase of 12% nail
growth rate and a decrease of 42% in the frequency of broken nails. Addition-
ally, 64% of participants achieved a global clinical improvement in brittle nails,
and 88% of participants experienced an improvement 4 weeks post-treatment.
The majority of participants (80%) agreed that the use of BCP improved their
nailsappearance, and were completely satisfied with the performance of the
treatment.
Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the daily ingestion of BCP increased nail
growth and improved brittle nails in conjunction with a notable decrease in the fre-
quency of broken nails.
KEYWORDS
bioactive collagen peptides, brittle nails, collagen hydrolysate, dietary supplements, fragile nails,
nail growth
1
|
INTRODUCTION
Brittle nail syndrome is a disorder characterized by the increased fra-
gility of the nail plate, exhibiting surface roughness, raggedness (fray-
ing of the distal edge), and peeling.
1,2
It affects about 20% of the
population, and women are affected twice as often as men.
2
Patients
usually complain that their nails are soft, dry, weak, easily breakable,
and incapable of growing long.
2
The pathogenesis of brittle nails is usually related to an impaired
water-binding capacity. This may reflect an abnormality in keratin,
keratin-associated proteins, and/or lipid content.
2
The treatment of
brittle fingernails has been a big challenge for dermatologists.
3
Accepted: 18 July 2017
DOI: 10.1111/jocd.12393
J Cosmet Dermatol. 2017;17. wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/jocd ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
|
1
Several topical and systemic therapies have been tried.
1,4,5
Dietary
supplements, nail moisturizers, nail strengtheners, etc., have been
used, but there is no evidence-based data proving their effective-
ness.
1
Collagen peptides have long been used as a food source and/or
supplement.
6
Interestingly, food-derived collagen peptides have not
only been demonstrated to reach the blood stream,
7-9
but also to nota-
bly stimulate the dermal cellular metabolism, improving the biosynthesis
of extracellular matrix proteins and, consequently, restoring the dermal
structure.
6,10-13
In two prospective randomized placebo-controlled clini-
cal trials, Proksch et al
14,15
showed improvement in skin elasticity,
decrease in wrinkle volume, and increase in the collagen I and elastin
content in the skin of women who ingested, during 8 weeks, 2.5 g/d of
the bioactive collagen peptides (BCP) used in the present study.
Although nail assessments were not the objective of those studies, an
improvement in nail quality among the study participants was noticed
as a positive side effect (Proksch E, Schunck M, Zague V, Segger D,
Degwert J & Oesser S, 2014, unpublished data).
Additionally, there is a long-standing belief among consumers that
the ingestion of collagen peptides is good for nails. There is, however,
no scientific-based evidence that it is effective for this purpose. For
this reason, we investigated whether the daily ingestion of 2.5 g of a
specific BCP for 6 months could have a positive influence on the
symptoms of brittle nails and promote nail growth and strength.
2
|
MATERIALS AND METHODS
2.1
|
Investigational product
The BCP used in this study present high safety profile and derive
from a complex multistep procedure by the degradation of porcine
type I collagen (VERISOL
â
, Gelita AG, Eberbach, Germany). The pro-
duct is clearly defined by a matrix-assisted laser desorption ioniza-
tion mass spectrometry mass peaks fingerprint with specific collagen
peptides of an average molecular weight of 2.0 kD. It should be dis-
solved preferably in water and ingested everyday according to the
instructions given by the investigator.
2.2
|
Study design
This was an open, single-center clinical trial carried out in the Brazil-
ian Center for Studies in Dermatology, Porto Alegre, Brazil. The
Ethics Committee of the Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre,
Brazil, approved the study. All the patients gave written informed
consent before the study.
2.3
|
Subjects
Twenty-five healthy women were enrolled in the study for treatment
with a daily dose of 2.5 g of BCP for 6 months followed by a 4-
week observation period off therapy.
Participants were aged from 18 to 50 and displayed at least
one of the following signs of brittle nails: lamellar splitting of the
free edge (lamellar peeling), fissuring of the distal nail plate
(edge irregularities), and longitudinal ridging/grooves (nail
roughness).
The main exclusion criteria were pregnancy or lactation; meno-
pause; smoking; acute skin diseases; diseases, medications, products
or procedures that could interfere with the results; nail-biting habit;
taking vitamins and other supplements; food allergies against the
ingredients of the test products; gastrointestinal diseases; changes in
lifestyle or eating habits during the study. Moreover, subjects were
advised to retain their daily occupational and nail care routines, and
to avoid long-term exposure to water, use of abrasive or aggressive
products, and trimming cuticles.
2.4
|
Measurement time points
At the screening visit (4 weeks before baseline), an experienced der-
matologist clinically evaluated all the patients and collected data on
demographic characteristics. Photographs and markings on the nails
for subsequent growth measurements were also performed.
Photographs, clinical assessments, nail growth rate, and fre-
quency of broken nails were performed at baseline (t
0
), after 12 and
24 weeks (t
12
and t
24
) of daily product intake, and 4 weeks after the
last intake (washout phase). Adverse events, compliance, and toler-
ance to the product were assessed during the study. The satisfaction
questionnaire was conducted at the last visit.
2.5
|
Clinical assessments
The dermatologist evaluated the brittle nail symptoms and overall
improvement of the nails at each visit. The assessment of the brit-
tle nail symptoms included nail peeling, edge irregularities, and nail
roughness,
1,16,17
and was performed according to the grading sys-
tem proposed by Sherber et al
16
: none, slight, moderate, and
severe.
The global improvement was defined as excellent, good, fair, no
improvement, or worse,
16
as described in the subjective 5-point
scale suggested by Sherber et al
16
The investigator compared the
photographs of each participants nails taken at baseline (t
0
) to those
taken at each of the following visits.
2.6
|
Frequency of cracked and/or chipped nails
The subjects received a form in which they should record daily how
many times their nails had been cracked or chipped on each hand.
2.7
|
Nail growth assessment
The nails of the middle fingers were marked at the edge of the
lunula 4 weeks before the baseline (t
0
) to ascertain the basal growth
rate of each participant. The investigator measured the distance
from the edge of the lunula to the marked point at each visit and
confirmed the results with Mirror-DPS 7.02
â
software (Canfield Sci-
entific Inc., Fairfax, NJ, USA).
2
|
HEXSEL ET AL.
2.8
|
Satisfaction questionnaire
A satisfaction questionnaire assessed patient satisfaction with the
treatment on a 5-point scale (very satisfied, satisfied, neither satis-
fied nor unsatisfied, unsatisfied, and very unsatisfied). Patients were
also asked to rate the overall improvement of their nails from 0 to
10, and to answer the following questions: (i) Do you think your
nails are stronger? (ii) Do you think your nails are growing faster?
2.9
|
Statistical analysis
One-way ANOVA with the multiple comparisons Fischer post-test
method was used to compare numerical variables. Significance was
defined as P<.05 using the data analysis software Minitab, version
15.1.1.0 (Minitab Inc, State College, PA, USA). Each value was
expressed as mean standard deviation (SD). The categorical vari-
ables were represented by a percentage.
3
|
RESULTS
Twenty-five participants were enrolled in the study, but one partici-
pant withdrew prior to the last visit. The data of the 24 subjects
who completed the study were included in the analysis. The partici-
pantsmean age SD was 39.3 7.6 years (range: 26-50 years).
No adverse reactions related to the product intake were reported.
3.1
|
Clinical assessments
After 12 weeks of treatment, the number of participants displaying
severeor moderatenail peeling halved (16 to 8 out of 24), and
those with the score slightdoubled (8 to 16 out of 24). The most
noticeable results were measured after 24 weeks, when only 6 of 24
participants (25%) had the score severeor moderate,and 8% of
the participants showed no symptoms. The positive results contin-
ued after the washout phase (Figure 1A).
The positive results on the longitudinal split of the free edge
appeared after 24 weeks of treatment with BCP, where only 4% of
participants scored severe.After the washout phase, none of the
participants had the score severe,and the percentage of slight
scores increased from 17% to 38% (Figure 1B). No clinically relevant
changes were observed before and after treatment with BCP for nail
roughness (Figure 1C).
Of all the 24 participants analyzed, 13 participants (54%) had fair
improvement on nail symptoms at week 12 compared with baseline
(Figure 2). At week 24, 64% achieved notably global improvement
(excellent/good/fair). After the washout phase, 21 participants (88%)
showed excellent/good/fair improvement (Figure 3).
3.2
|
Frequency of cracked and/or chipped nails
Before starting the treatment, the participantsfrequency of broken
nails were on average 10 times/mo (10.5 8.4). It significantly
(P<.05) decreased to 6 times/mo (6.4 4.9) after 24 weeks of
treatment, representing a reduction of 42%. This improvement con-
tinued during the washout phase (Figure 4).
3.3
|
Nail growth
The basal nail growth rate of the participants was on average
2.65 0.42 mm/mo. After 12 weeks of treatment with BCP, the
growth rate improved significantly (P<.05) to 2.90 0.47 mm/mo.
These results showed an improvement in nail growth of 10% after
12 weeks of BCP intake. This increased to 12% after 24 weeks, and
to 15% 4 weeks after the last intake (Figure 5).
3.4
|
Satisfaction questionnaire
The majority of participants (80%) agreed that the use of BCP had
improved their nailsappearance and were totally satisfied or satis-
fied with the performance of the treatment. In contrast, only 20%
were indifferent about or unsatisfied with the treatment. The overall
improvement was in average 7.3 2.9 scale points on the 0-10
scale as assessed by the participants. Of the 24 participants who
completed the study correctly, 11 rated the overall improvement
with 9 or 10 scale points (46% of all study participants). Moreover,
75% of patients perceived their nails as stronger, and 71% felt that
their nails were growing faster and longer.
4
|
DISCUSSION
The present authors investigated whether the daily ingestion of
specific BCP for 24 weeks could positively influence the symptoms
of brittle nails and improve nail growth and strength. We detected a
considerable clinical improvement, an increase in nail growth rate,
and a significant decrease in the frequency of broken nails. In accor-
dance with these findings, most participants perceived their nails as
stronger and were satisfied with the treatment. To the best of our
knowledge, no data have been reported regarding the effects of
BCP intake on nails, and the present study is the first clinical trial
demonstrating the efficacy of a specific dosage (2.5 g/d) of
VERISOL
â
on nail growth and brittle nails syndrome.
In this study, the daily intake of BCP clearly attenuated the
symptoms of brittle nails after 24 weeks: 64% of women showed
clinical global improvement. And it was even more pronounced after
the 4-week washout period, when 88% of participants showed clini-
cal global improvement, suggesting a positive effect of BCP treat-
ment is likely caused by the direct effect of BCP on the nail matrix
and nail bed.
When administered orally, BCP are absorbed in the form of small
collagen peptides and free amino acids.
7-9,18
Free amino acids pro-
vide building blocks for the formation of dermal extracellular matrix
proteins and for the epidermal structure, whereas collagen peptides
act as bioactive messengers, activating different signaling pathways
and stimulating dermal and epidermal metabolism.
10,13,19
Hence,
HEXSEL ET AL.
|
3
clinical improvements in brittle nails symptoms observed in the pre-
sent study may not only be a consequence of the protein intake, but
also due to the stimulatory effects of specific collagen peptides on
epidermal and dermal metabolism.
Patients who perceive nail fragility usually complain about slower
nail growth, which may prolong the exposure of the nail plate to
external damaging factors that worsen brittle nail syndrome.
17
The
nails show a continuous growth over a lifetime, controlled by a vari-
ety of cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-tissue interactions as well as sig-
naling factors, many of which are not yet clearly defined.
20
It also
depends on age, blood supply, nutrients, environmental, and occupa-
tional factors.
17
The formation of the nail plate requires epidermal proliferation
and nail matrix differentiation.
1
Le Vu et al
19
revealed that collagen
peptides supplementation was associated with the development of
the epidermis with a 5.3-fold enrichment. It does so by upregulating
genes such as Gprc, Krt, and Krtap, which code for structural com-
ponents of epidermis and skin appendages such as hair, hair follicles,
and nails. These findings suggest the potential benefits of BCP treat-
ment on nail growth.
FIGURE 1 Clinical improvement of
brittle nail symptoms after 24 wk of oral
supplementation with bioactive collagen
peptides, followed by 4-wk washout
period. A. Lamellar peeling. B. Fissuring of
the distal nail plate (edge irregularities). C.
Longitudinal ridging/grooves (nail
roughness)
4
|
HEXSEL ET AL.
Nail fragility is also determined by the nail plates water content.
Experimental trials have shown that BCP may improve the synthesis
of important proteins for the epidermal barrier, turnover, and mois-
ture. Treatment of epidermal skin cells (keratinocytes) led to an
up-regulation of filaggrin, loricrin, and involucrin, cornified envelope
proteins which are important for a healthy epidermal skin barrier and
skin moisturizing (Collagen Research Institutes data; not published).
Data from clinical
15,21
and animal
22,23
trials have also demonstrated
FIGURE 2 Exemplary pictures of
participants before (t
0
) and after 12 wk
(t
12
) of oral supplementation with bioactive
collagen peptides (BCP). A. The distal
portion of the nail plate showed a lamellar
exfoliation into fine horizontal layers and
triangular pieces could easily be torn from
the free margin at baseline visit (t
0
). After
12 wk (t
12
) lamellar splitting improved
notably. B. Isolated split at the free edge,
which sometimes extended proximally, was
visible at baseline visit (t
0
) and evidently
attenuated after 12 wk (t
12
)
FIGURE 3 Global clinical improvement
of brittle nail syndrome after 24 wk of
daily oral supplementation with bioactive
collagen peptides, followed by 4-wk
washout period
FIGURE 4 Frequency of cracked and/
or chipped nails after daily treatment with
bioactive collagen peptides for 24 wk,
followed by 4-wk washout period.
(mean SEM; n =24; *P<.05)
HEXSEL ET AL.
|
5
the improvement of the epidermal barrier and moisture after colla-
gen peptides supplementation. Therefore, the improvement of nail
strength demonstrated in this trail may be a result of the increased
water-binding capacity of brittle nails promoted by BCP supplemen-
tation. It might help to explain the positive effects even after treat-
ment ceased.
As an open, noncontrolled trial, the results presented herein
should have the inherent biases considered. It can be assumed that
the positive effect is based on the supplementation of VERISOL;
however, a certain influence of behavioral changes of some partici-
pants could not be fully excluded.
With many different measurements taken at each visit, perhaps
the most telling result is the high participant satisfaction. Interest-
ingly, most participants reported they previously tried other treat-
ments without success. Both the physician and the participants
noticed a clear improvement and were satisfied with the treatment.
The ingestion of specific BCP led to a pronounced global clinical
improvement in brittle nails, a significant increase in nail growth rate,
and a decrease in the frequency of cracked or chipped nails in the
present trial. Further research with larger samples and prolonged
treatment is needed to explore the mechanism of action that leads
brittle nails improvements, and larger, placebo-controlled studies are
required to confirm the observed results.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors thank Aline Flor Silva for her assistance with study
administration.
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FIGURE 5 Nail growth improvement
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12 wk and was even more pronounced at
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6
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How to cite this article: Hexsel D, Zague V, Schunck M,
Siega C, Camozzato FO, Oesser S. Oral supplementation with
specific bioactive collagen peptides improves nail growth and
reduces symptoms of brittle nails. J Cosmet Dermatol.
2017;00:17. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12393
HEXSEL ET AL.
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7
... Skin Improves elasticity (19) Reduces wrinkles (3) Improves hydration (18) anti-aging (3) Reduces wrinkles (16) Improves firmness (2) Anti-aging/more youthful (9) Brightens skin (2) Improves firmness (6) Improves elasticity (1) Plumps skin (6) Reduces sagging (1) Helps acne (6) Improves overall skin health (1) Improves cellulite (5) Helps wound healing (1) Prevents sagging skin (2) Enhances moisture (1) Makes skin brighter (3) Lightens skin (1) Reduces stretch marks (2) ...
... In an open-label, single-arm trial of 25 participants, 2.5 g of bioactive collagen peptide was consumed for 24 weeks followed by a 4-week off-therapy period. 18 The authors found that peptide treatment promoted an increase of nail growth rate by 12% and a decrease in the frequency of broken nails 42%. ...
Article
Background: As a key component of the hair, skin, and nails, there is strong consumer interest in the dermatologic efficacy of oral collagen supplementation. Oral supplementation with collagen peptides has increased in popularity in recent years. Aims: There are relatively few studies investigating the dermatologic effects of ingested collagen peptides, many of which are limited by sample size and variability of results. The question remains whether there is sufficient evidence to support companies' promises and consumers' goals. Methods: In this review, we investigate and compare the claims surrounding collagen supplementation on Instagram and YouTube, made by collagen companies, and established in the literature. Results: Although some studies have demonstrated that collagen supplementation can enhance skin qualities such as elasticity and hydration, dermatologic claims in the media surpass any evidence currently supported by the literature. Conclusions: More research is needed to establish knowledge of the effects and physiologic mechanism of collagen supplementation. Dermatologists should be aware of the unsubstantiated proclamations of collagen made by companies and in social media, as well as what evidence is established thus far, to be equipped to discuss collagen supplementation with patients. Keywords: anti-aging; collagen; collagen hydrolysate; hair; nails; supplements.
... Nowadays, there are many studies which revealed the effect of oral supplementations on the skin quality [20]- [30] while there are few published studies on the effect of an oral supplementation on nails growth and quality. 2.5 g once daily for 24 weeks followed by a 4-week off-therapy period on 25 participants with brittle nails [32]. This oral supplementation promoted an increase of 12% nail growth rate and a decrease of 42% in the frequency of broken nails. ...
... Additionally, 64% of participants achieved a global clinical improvement in brittle nails, and 88% of participants experienced an improvement 4 weeks post-treatment. The majority of participants (80%) agreed that the use of BCP improved their nails' appearance, and were completely satisfied with the performance of the treatment [32]. ...
... Supplement drinks containing hydrolysed bioactive collagen peptides, in combination with vitamins, minerals and botanical antioxidants are frequently used in nutricosmeceutical products to improve skin elasticity, hydration and visible signs of fine lines and wrinkles [86][87][88][89] . Furthermore, studies have reported benefits for nail growth and reduction of the symptoms associated with broken, brittle or split nails [90] . All proteins and peptides need to be hydrolysed in the gut to allow absorption into the bloodstream and transport throughout the body [ Figure 12]. ...
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This chapter discusses the physiologic, metabolic, and clinical aspects of collagen, including the role of nutritional factors in a new nosographic entity, called “extended collagen carential disease.” Except water and possibly fats, carbohydrates, and other structural proteins, perhaps there is more collagen in the mammalian body than anything else. Moreover, collagen participates in almost all of the body functions, adjusting its structure constantly in response to changes in environment, development, growth, and external clues. Collagens found in bones and nails are different from collagens found in body fluids and other biological structures, such as basement membrane, skin, tendons, muscles, and hair. The ubiquity of collagen functions accounts for its phylogenetic ubiquity, involving any tissue, organ, and apparatus. This is shown by the so-called “collagen carential disease,” involving nails, hair, osteoarticular and gastrointestinal systems. For instance, the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome describes another group of genetic collagen disorders, affecting the collagen processing and structure. Some of them are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, while others emerge in the absence of essential nutritional factors. It is the case of Vitamin C, which plays a critical role in the maintenance of a normal mature collagen network. Hence, the idea of an “extended collagen carential disease,” applicable to the absence of essential nutritional factors.
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In recent years, collagen drinks have become a popular supplement, which has been stimulating the appetites of collagen-conscious patients, due to their perceived health and beauty benefits. These beauty supplements are frequently promoted on social media and endorsed by celebrities for their glowing skin and the wrinkle-reducing results. With collagen shots, powders, capsules, gels, gummy sweets, chocolates and coffee creamers filling shop shelves and advertised on social media channels, it may be challenging to avoid being swayed by all the hype. This article aims to help us explore the science behind the hype and if collagen supplements are safe and effective to take and why.
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As the cosmeceutical market for nail products is growing, there is an emerging need for dermatologists to provide patients with evidence‐based information regarding over‐the‐counter products and supplements for nail growth. By law, there is no required efficacy and safety assessment by the Food and Drug Administration prior to these products being made available to consumers. This carries financial and health consequences for patients seeking affordable and effective over‐the‐counter products to improve their nail conditions. In this comprehensive review, we discuss available oral nail growth products, their mechanisms of action, and side effects.
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The nail is a specialized keratinous skin appendage that is often overlooked, even though nail disorders comprise approximately 10% of all dermatologic conditions. We provide an overview on the basic anatomy of the nail and function of each structure. We examine the chemical profile, including the keratin and mineral composition, of the nail plate. Subsequently, nail manifestations are reviewed, as virtually every nutritional deficiency can affect nail growth in some manner. We focus on how each nutritional deficiency can affect the different anatomic structures of the nail unit. The terminology and the differential diagnoses of the many different nail plate and nail bed abnormalities are reviewed. Finally, we focus on the evidence behind nutrition-based treatments in the setting of several nail disorders
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Brittle nails are a polymorphic disorder characterized by increased fragility or loss of flexibility of the nail plate. The prevalence is approximately 20%, with women being nearly twice as likely to be affected than men. Patients may complain of both aesthetic and functional problems. The cardinal clinical features are onychoschizia, or lamellar splitting and peeling of the nail plate’s free edge, and onychorrhexis, or longitudinal ridging of the nail plate. The pathophysiology is not fully understood, and there are few evidence-based treatments. In this chapter, we review the etiology, history, physical findings, and treatment options for brittle nails.
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The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of an oral supplementation based on hydrolyzed collagen and vitamins in the improvement of aged skin conditions using biophysical and skin imaging techniques. In this doubleblind, placebo-controlled trials, 60 woman aged between 40-60 years were randomized to receive the product containing hydrolyzed collagen and vitamins (Group A) or the placebo (Group B), once daily for 90-days period. Skin elasticity, dermis echogenicity, hydration and, number of pores and wrinkles were measured before and at the end of the study. The results showed an improvement of the dermis echogenicity and skin elasticity, as well as a reduction of wrinkles and total amount of pores on the skin of the group A when compared with placebo group. Thus, it was concluded that oral supplementation under study present itself as a potential to act effectively on aged skin. Finally, the study contributes to the improvement of effective strategies to skin care beyond topical products use.
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Oral ingestion of collagen peptides (CP) has long been suggested to exert beneficial effects on the skin, but the molecular events induced by CP on the skin remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of oral CP administration on gene expression in hairless mouse skin and of prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), a collagen-derived dipeptide, on gene expression in a coculture of mouse skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Using microarray analysis, we found that oral administration of CP to hairless mice for 6 weeks induced increased expression of Krtap and Krt genes in the skin. Annotation analysis using DAVID revealed that a group of the up-regulated genes, Gprc5d, Sprr2a1, Krt27 and Krtap16-7, is associated with the development of the epidermis and the hair cycle. In addition, the presence of Pro-Hyp (200 μM) induced an increase in the expression of Krtap16-7, Krtap15, Krtap14 and Krtap8-2 in keratinocytes in coculture, partially resembling the in vivo result. The Pro-Hyp-induced up-regulation of these genes was not observed when keratinocytes were cultured without fibroblasts, suggesting that the presence of fibroblasts is essential for the effects of Pro-Hyp. Our study presents new insights into the effects of CP on the skin, which might link to the hair cycle. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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Dietary consumption of food supplements has been found to modulate skin functions and can therefore be useful in the treatment of skin aging. However, there is only a limited number of clinical studies supporting these claims. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effectiveness of the specific bioactive collagen peptide (BCP) VERISOL® on eye wrinkle formation and stimulation of procollagen I, elastin and fibrillin biosynthesis in the skin was assessed. A hundred and fourteen women aged 45-65 years were randomized to receive 2.5 g of BCP or placebo, once daily for 8 weeks, with 57 subjects being allocated to each treatment group. Skin wrinkles were objectively measured in all subjects, before starting the treatment, after 4 and 8 weeks as well as 4 weeks after the last intake (4-week regression phase). A subgroup was established for suction blister biopsies analyzing procollagen I, elastin and fibrillin at the beginning of the treatment and after 8 weeks of intake. The ingestion of the specific BCP used in this study promoted a statistically significant reduction of eye wrinkle volume (p < 0.05) in comparison to the placebo group after 4 and 8 weeks (20%) of intake. Moreover a positive long-lasting effect was observed 4 weeks after the last BCP administration (p < 0.05). Additionally, after 8 weeks of intake a statistically significantly higher content of procollagen type I (65%) and elastin (18%) in the BCP-treated volunteers compared to the placebo-treated patients was detected. For fibrillin, a 6% increase could be determined after BCP treatment compared to the placebo, but this effect failed to reach the level of statistical significance. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the oral intake of specific bioactive collagen peptides (Verisol®) reduced skin wrinkles and had positive effects on dermal matrix synthesis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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Various dietary supplements are claimed to have cutaneous anti-aging properties; however, there are a limited number of research studies supporting these claims. The objective of this research was to study the effectiveness of collagen hydrolysate (CH) composed of specific collagen peptides on skin biophysical parameters related to cutaneous aging. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 69 women aged 35-55 years were randomized to receive 2.5 g or 5.0 g of CH or placebo once daily for 8 weeks, with 23 subjects being allocated to each treatment group. Skin elasticity, skin moisture, transepidermal water loss and skin roughness were objectively measured before the first oral product application (t0) and after 4 (t1) and 8 weeks (t2) of regular intake. Skin elasticity (primary interest) was also assessed at follow-up 4 weeks after the last intake of CH (t3, 4-week regression phase). At the end of the study, skin elasticity in both CH dosage groups showed a statistically significant improvement in comparison to placebo. After 4 weeks of follow-up treatment, a statistically significantly higher skin elasticity level was determined in elderly women. With regard to skin moisture and skin evaporation, a positive influence of CH treatment could be observed in a subgroup analysis, but data failed to reach a level of statistical significance. No side effects were noted throughout the study. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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Background: Several human studies have demonstrated occurrence of two major collagen peptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), hydroxyprolyl-glycine (Hyp-Gly), in human peripheral blood. Some in vitro studies have demonstrated that Pro-Hyp and Hyp-Gly has chemotaxis to dermal fibroblast and enhance cell proliferation. Additionally, Pro-Hyp enhances the production of hyaluronic acid by dermal fibroblast. These findings suggest that contents of Pro-Hyp and Hyp-Gly in blood are important factors to exhibit the efficacy of collagen hydrolysates on skin health. Results: We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of ingestion of two types of collagen hydrolysates, which are composed of different contents of the bioactive dipeptides, Pro-Hyp and Hyp-Gly, to investigate their effects on skin condition improvement. Improvement in skin conditions such as skin moisture, elasticity, wrinkles, and roughness were compared with a placebo group at baseline, and four and eight weeks after the start of the trial. In addition, the safety of dietary supplementation with these peptides was evaluated by blood test. Collagen hydrolysate with a higher content of bioactive collagen peptides (H-CP) showed significant and more improvement than the collagen hydrolysate with a lower content of bioactive collagen peptides (L-CP) and the placebo, in facial skin moisture, elasticity (R2), wrinkles and roughness, compared with the placebo group. In addition, there were no adverse events during the trial. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the collagen hydrolysate with a higher content of Pro-Hyp and Hyp-Gly, showed more improvement in facial skin condition, including facial skin moisture, elasticity, wrinkles and roughness.
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Nail disorders are difficult to treat and often frustrating both for patients and clinicians. Because of the slow growth rate of the nail plate and the difficulty of getting the drug actives to penetrate the nail tissues, it is usually necessary to wait several months before seeing the results of treatments. This delay often leads to discontinuation of therapy by the patients. This article therefore helps clinicians to find the right treatment of the 5 most common nail disorders (brittle nails, onycholysis, paronychia, psoriasis, and onychomycosis) and provides practical tips that might improve patients' compliance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Oral supplementation with collagen hydrolysate (CH) has been shown to improve the condition of the skin in humans and experimental animals. Several hydroxyproline-containing oligo-peptides were previously detected in human peripheral blood after the ingestion of CH, and the two dipeptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline (PO) and hydroxyprolyl-glycine (OG), have been proposed to have beneficial effects on human health. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a HR-AD diet, which lacked magnesium and zinc, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increased and water content of stratum corneum decreased. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary PO and OG on skin barrier dysfunction in HR-1 hairless mice. Mice were fed a HR-AD diet with or without PO (0.15%) and OG (0.15%) for 35 consecutive days. The administration of PO and OG significantly decreased TEWL, and significantly increased water content of stratum corneum. A DNA microarray analysis of the dorsal skin revealed differences in gene expression between the group administered PO and OG and the control group. We also identified muscle-related Gene Ontology as a result of analyzing the up-regulated genes. These results suggested that the administration of PO and OG improved skin barrier dysfunction and altered muscle-related gene expression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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The presence of hydroxyproline (Hyp)-containing peptides in human blood after collagen hydrolysate ingestion is believed to exert beneficial effects on human health. To estimate the effective beneficial dose of these peptides, we examined the relationship between ingested dose and food-derived Hyp levels in human plasma. Healthy volunteers (n = 4) ingested 30.8, 153.8 and 384.6 mg per kg body weight of collagen hydrolysate. The average plasma concentration of Hyp-containing peptides was dose-dependent, reaching maximum levels of 6.43, 20.17 and 32.84 nmol/ml following ingestion of 30.8, 153.8 and 384.6-mg doses of collagen hydrolysate, respectively. Ingesting over 153.8 mg of collagen hydrolysate significantly increased the average concentrations of the free and peptide forms of Hyp in plasma. The Hyp absorption limit was not reached with ingestion of as much as 384.6 mg of collagen hydrolysate. These finding suggest that ingestion of less than 30.8 mg of collagen hydrolysate is not effective for health benefits.
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Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation induces serious damage to the skin. Collagen hydrolysate and collagen-derived peptides have effects on skin function in vivo and in vitro. However, few studies have investigated changes in the epidermal barrier or dermal elasticity caused by UVB. Here, we investigated the loss of epidermal barrier function and skin elasticity induced by UVB irradiation in hairless mice fed collagen hydrolysate. Mice were orally administered collagen hydrolysate, in a single dose (20 mJ/cm(2) ) or repeated doses (10-30 mJ/cm(2) , 3 times/week for 6 weeks), and the dorsal skin was exposed to UVB. Skin measurements and histological and analytical studies were performed. In control mice, a single UVB irradiation induced epidermal barrier dysfunction including an increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), epidermal hyperplasia, and a decrease in stratum corneum water content. Administration of collagen hydrolysate significantly decreased TEWL and epidermal thickness and increased stratum corneum water content. Repeated UVB irradiation decreased skin elasticity and dermal hyaluronic acid (HA) content in control mice, whereas collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed both the increase in TEWL and the decrease in stratum corneum water content and improved skin elasticity and dermal HA content. Collagen hydrolysate administration affects epidermal barrier function and dermal skin elasticity.
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Brittle nails are characterized by roughness of the surface of the nail plate, fragility, and peeling. This is a condition that is seen commonly in elderly individuals, and it is associated mostly with an abnormality of keratin, keratin associated proteins, water, and/or lipid content. It is idiopathic in the majority of the cases, but there are some dermatological and systemic diseases that can be associated with brittle nails. Treatment is a challenge for the clinician, in some case, can be difficult, and certainly needs strong cooperation of the patient.