Conference Paper

Content Reconstruction of Parliamentary Questions

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Abstract

The Hellenic Parliament stores parliamentary questions using a combination of metadata extracted manually from the original text as well as the scanned document as an image file. Consequently, broad access and study of the parliamentary questions are limited as there is no principal access to the original content. A combined process was designed in order to fully reconstruct the original content of the parliamentary questions using the available metadata, which were extracted during the archivation phase, and a modified mass Optical Character Recognition (OCR) process. Post-correction of OCR results and quality controls of extracted text are paramount to ensure that the text output matches the one from the original document. The results from the OCR process are joined with the metadata and allow the full description of the original document.

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The role of the national Parliaments in scrutinizing the governments’ actions has been in the academic agenda for a long time. The paper will examine the parliamentary response, in terms of parliamentary control, on the governmental negotiations for three Economic Adjustment Programmes for Greece in the time period from 2010 and 2015. In an additional case study, parliamentary means in the National Assembly of Serbia will be examined in the light of the opening of the negotiation process with the EU. In both cases, an overview of the available means of parliamentary control will be presented, followed by a discussion of their suitability to exercise control of governmental actions in the European organs. Specific cases of parliamentary control will be presented, as well as relevant statistics.
Conference Paper
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