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Grade Point Level, Reading Fluency, and Perceived Digital Reading Ability of Video Game Players and Nonplayers

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Abstract

This study compared grade point level, silent contextual reading fluency, and perceived digital reading ability of 1,206 South Korean video game players and nonplayers in grades 9 through 12. The findings strengthen results reported in the literature while also contributing new information. Nonplayers had better grades, a finding that supports previous research showing that gameplay can negatively influence academic performance. Nonplayers were better readers, a finding in disagreement with studies showing that Internet use, to include video game play, can help with reading performance. While players held higher views of themselves regarding their digital reading ability, these perceptions were not aligned with their grades and reading test scores as well as their online activities when compared to their nonplayer counterparts.

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