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Future's Mirror: The Endocannabinoid System in Human Pathology

Authors:
  • Mind magazine/the Journal of Unconscious Psychology/Scientific Advisor Thunder Energies Corporation

Abstract

Cannabis Sativa has been used for medicinal and other purposes for millennia. In the 1990s the CB1 and CB2 receptors and the endogenous ligands of the endo-cannabinoid system proper were discovered: Anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). External mediation of the bodily endo-cannabinoid system with exogenous phytochemical cannabinoids and other active compounds within Cannabis representative of the full interactive proliferation of naturally occurring constituents appears from manifest interdigitated cross-mediational systemic complexity and phylogenetic receptor analysis to imply the likelihood of potential synergistic therapeutic efficacy via evolutionary adaptations beginning from as far back as the Cambrian period or more. This approach utilizing the full proliferation of interactive compounds or some selected intra-active multi-constituent portion thereof, has been demonstrably curtailed by legal, political and systemic interference. This document will spell out the demonstrated functional potential and implied therapeutic utility of cannabinoids and cannabis extracts, support the aforementioned evolutionary hypothesis and demonstrated multifunctional medical utility with both phylogenetic and historical analysis, and then detail what appears to be the suppressed approach that may lead to the speedy and inexpensive treatment or cure of many dread diseases using Cannabis extracts, including but not limited to cancer. It is also clearly implied and well supported from historical and current medical perspectives that the raw drug itself is safe and effective in treating many conditions and should be available to dispense via prescription by all qualified medical professionals.
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