Conference Paper

Comparison of Modelling Tools for the Assessment of the Parameters of Driving Assistance Solutions

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Abstract

The main idea of the present work is to define the domain in which it is possible to adopt very simple models of vehicle dynamics for applications in the testing of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) in lieu of complex models. The aim is to reduce the computational burden, and consequently the computing time. In particular, in the paper, the performances of a very simple model of vehicle dynamics, the Single Track with linear tires, have been compared with those of a complex and complete model, with non-linear tires, included in a commercial software (IPG CarMaker). For sake of shortness, the comparison has been carried out focusing on the lateral dynamical behaviour, and consequently the testing of a Lane Keeping Assistant (LKA) system has been carried out. Of course both the vehicle dynamic models, and the ADAS system have been integrated in a common simulation environment (Simulink), and tested in the standard traffic scenarios defined in EuroNCAP test protocols.

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... Since the motion of a ground vehicle is primarily determined by the friction forces transferred from roads via tyres, information about the tyre/road interaction is critical to many active vehicle safety control systems, including longitudinal control, yaw stability control and rollover prevention control systems. In particular friction formation is crucial tool for Brake Assist Systems (BAS), Electronic Stability Control (ESC-ESP) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) systems that have recently become essential for active safety systems, as shown in [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]. For instance, in the case of adaptive cruise control, estimation of friction force enables the braking distances to be adjusted in real time. ...
... Assuming that the wheel radius () w R remains constant during braking, ignoring main shaft torque and lateral acceleration, summing the total vertical wheel reaction forces, considering the characteristics in real-time and applying some mathematical calculations, yields to 3 3 ...
... In order to obtain equation above, it is essential to have wheel angular velocity, braking torque and also the vehicle longitudinal velocity in real-time. 3 ESTIMATOR DESIGN ...
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... In particular, friction information is a crucial tool for Electronic Stability Control (ESP-ESC), Brake Assist Systems (BAS) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) systems that have recently become CONTACT Francesco Timpone francesco.timpone@unina.it necessary for vehicle active safety systems [1][2][3][4]. For instance, in the case of the ACC system, estimation of friction coefficient (μ) between tyre and road could enable the braking distances to be adjusted in real-time (see e.g. ...
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