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“I feel I can live every minute if I choose to”: participants’ experience of a positive mindfulness programme

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Both separately and in conjunction, mindfulness and positive psychological interventions have been found to increase wellbeing against a number of measures. Research has been primarily based upon the application of self-report scales, and little has yet been done to examine the lived experience of participants. The aim of this study therefore was to apply an interpretative phenomenological approach to the experience of participants in a Mindfulness Based Flourishing (MBF) programme which combines positive psychological interventions with mindfulness, in order to more fully understand the scope and depth of the impact their experience had on them. Three participants from a completed MBF each had a one-off semi-structured interview, the results of which were transcribed verbatim. The resulting texts were analysed, with five themes emerging which demonstrated the impact the programme had had on participants’ sense of self and on the nature of their connections with others. While all participants identified benefits accruing from the course, it also presented challenges emotionally as well as in terms of the embedding of knowledge and skills. Future research should look to examine the impact of such programmes in wider cultural and temporal frameworks, and additionally should explore the application of Grounded Theory to identify more theoretical level explanations of phenomenon.
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... Finally, research on the implementation and effectiveness of mindfulness-based programs has predominantly involved the use of quantitative methodologies [43]. The combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques and strategies would enrich the evaluation of mindfulness-based programs, allowing consideration of the integral views of the par-ticipants, and providing a more complete representation of the complexities behind the learning, integration of practices in daily life, and the implementation process [44]. ...
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