Heavy Barbell Hip Thrusts Do Not Effect Sprint Performance: An 8-Week Randomized–Controlled Study

Article (PDF Available)inThe Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research · July 2017with 1,941 Reads
DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002146
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week barbell hip thrust strength training program on sprint performance. Twenty-one collegiate athletes (15 males and 6 females) were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 11, age 27.36 ± 3.17 years, height 169.55 ± 10.38 cm, weight 72.7± 18 kg) or control group (n = 10, age 27.2 ± 3.36 years, height 176.2 ± 7.94 cm, weight 76.39 ± 11.47 kg). 1RM hip thrust, 40m sprint time, and individual 10m split timings: 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40m, were the measured variables; these recorded at both the baseline and post testing time points. Following the 8-week hip thrust strength training intervention significantly greater 1RM hip thrust scores for the training group were observed (p < 0.001, d = 0.77 [mean difference 44.09 kg]), however this failed to translate into changes in sprint time for any of the measured distances (all sprint performance measures: p > 0.05, r = 0.05 - 0.37). No significant differences were seen for the control group for 1RM hip thrust (p = 0.106, d = 0.24 [mean difference 9.4 kg]) or sprint time (all sprint performance measures: p > 0.05, r = 0.13 - 0.47). These findings suggest that increasing maximum hip thrust strength through use of the barbell hip thrust does not appear to transfer into improvements in sprint performance in collegiate level athletes.
  • ... T he barbell hip thrust (BHT) is a bridging exercise used to target the hip extensor and knee flexors' musculature that is growing in popularity among applied practitioners and exercise scientists (4,6,8,15,29). This is supported by the increasing number of studies investigating the BHT biomechanics (3), electro- myography responses (6), and the immediate (15) and lon- gitudinal (4,8,29) effects on athletic performance. ...
    ... T he barbell hip thrust (BHT) is a bridging exercise used to target the hip extensor and knee flexors' musculature that is growing in popularity among applied practitioners and exercise scientists (4,6,8,15,29). This is supported by the increasing number of studies investigating the BHT biomechanics (3), electro- myography responses (6), and the immediate (15) and lon- gitudinal (4,8,29) effects on athletic performance. For example, a heavy (85% of 1 repetition maximum [1RM] (47)) BHT completed 8-12 minutes before a sprinting activity was found to improve sprinting performance of football and handball athletes (15,16). ...
    ... Longitudinally, incorporating the BHT for a 6-8-week period was found to improve sprinting speeds (8) and 1RM in the BHT and squat (29). Although not all studies observed beneficial effects (4,29), in light of the growing popularity of the BHT, its relative ease of use, and potential athletic benefits, it is a worthwhile endeavor to investigate whether the exercise can also serve as a performance test. Similar to other exer- cises that are used as both training interventions and perfor- mance tests, such as the countermovement jumps (42), bench press exercises, and medicine ball throws (44), the BHT has the potential to be used as both. ...
    Article
    Dello Iacono, A, Padulo, J, Bešlija, T, and Halperin, I. Barbell hip-thrust exercise: Test-retest reliability and correlation with isokinetic performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The barbell hip-thrust (BHT) exercise is growing in popularity as evident by the large increase in research outputs investigating its utility as a training intervention and a testing tool. The aim of this study was to examine the test-retest reliability of the BHT and its correlation with isokinetic performance. Test-retest reliability was established by correlating the peak force and power outcomes measured with the BHT force-velocity profile test of 20 handball athletes on 2 separate days. The peak force and power measured with the BHT force-velocity profile test of 49 handball athletes were correlated with peak concentric force of the knee flexors and hip extensors measured with an isokinetic device at 2 different velocities (60-180°·s). The correlation between the isokinetic testing scores and the BHT force-velocity profile tests were moderate to large (Pearson r ranges: 0.45-0.86, all p values <0.001). Test-retest reliability of the BHT force-velocity profile was very high as shown with intraclass correlations of 0.94 and 0.99 for peak force and 0.97 and 0.99 for peak power measures. The BHT force-velocity profile can serve as a tentative substitute in cases that athletes do not have access to an isokinetic device, given the moderate to large correlations between them. Moreover, the BHT force-velocity profile was shown to be very reliable, thus providing coaches and scientists a range of day-to-day performance variability in this exercise.
  • Article
    Full-text available
    The capacity to rapidly generate and apply a great amount of force seems to play a key role in sprint running. However, it has recently been shown that, for sprinters, the technical ability to effectively orient the force onto the ground is more important than its total amount. The force-vector theory has been proposed to guide coaches in selecting the most adequate exercises to comprehensively develop the neuromechanical qualities related to the distinct phases of sprinting. This study aimed to compare the relationships between vertically-directed (loaded and unloaded vertical jumps, and half-squat) and horizontally-directed (hip-thrust) exercises and the sprint performance of top-level track and field athletes. Sixteen sprinters and jumpers (including three Olympic athletes) executed vertical jumps, loaded jump squats and hip-thrusts, and sprinting speed tests at 10-, 20-, 40-, 60-, 100-, and 150-m. Results indicated that the hip-thrust is more associated with the maximum acceleration phase (i.e., from zero to 10-m; r = 0.93), whereas the loaded and unloaded vertical jumps seem to be more related to top-speed phases (i.e., distances superior to 40-m; r varying from 0.88 to 0.96). These findings reinforce the mechanical concepts supporting the force-vector theory, and provide coaches and sport scientists with valuable information about the potential use and benefits of using vertically- or horizontally-based training exercises.
  • Article
    Full-text available
    Sprint mechanics and field 100-m performances were tested in 13 subjects including 9 non-specialists, 3 French national-level sprinters and a world-class sprinter, to further study the mechanical factors associated with sprint performance. 6-s sprints performed on an instrumented treadmill allowed continuous recording of step kinematics, ground reaction forces (GRF), and belt velocity and computation of mechanical power output and linear force-velocity relationships. An index of the force application technique was computed as the slope of the linear relationship between the decrease in the ratio of horizontal-to-resultant GRF and the increase in velocity. Mechanical power output was positively correlated to mean 100-m speed (P < 0.01), as was the theoretical maximal velocity production capability (P < 0.011), whereas the theoretical maximal force production capability was not. The ability to apply the resultant force backward during acceleration was positively correlated to 100-m performance (r (s) > 0.683; P < 0.018), but the magnitude of resultant force was not (P = 0.16). Step frequency, contact and swing time were significantly correlated to acceleration and 100-m performance (positively for the former, negatively for the two latter, all P < 0.05), whereas aerial time and step length were not (all P > 0.21). Last, anthropometric data of body mass index and lower-limb-to-height ratio showed no significant correlation with 100-m performance. We concluded that the main mechanical determinants of 100-m performance were (1) a "velocity-oriented" force-velocity profile, likely explained by (2) a higher ability to apply the resultant GRF vector with a forward orientation over the acceleration, and (3) a higher step frequency resulting from a shorter contact time.
  • Electromyographic Comparison Of Barbell Deadlift
    • Ki Nordaune
    • Ah Saeterbakken
    Nordaune, KI, & Saeterbakken, AH. Electromyographic Comparison Of Barbell Deadlift, Hex 21
  • Electromyographic Comparison Of Barbell Deadlift
    • K I Nordaune
    • A H Saeterbakken
    Nordaune, KI, & Saeterbakken, AH. Electromyographic Comparison Of Barbell Deadlift, Hex
  • Bar Deadlift And Hip Thrust Exercises: A Cross-Over Study
    Bar Deadlift And Hip Thrust Exercises: A Cross-Over Study. J Strength Cond Res. (Published 22 Ahead of Print). doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001826. 23 trained female athletes. J Strength Cond Res. 15: 326-331. 2001.
  • Mero, A. Force-time characteristics and running velocity of male sprinters during the 14 acceleration phase of sprinting
    • F Ros
    • A Mendez-Villanueva
    • Cmp Meylan
    • J B Cronin
    • J L Oliver
    • W G Hopkins
    • B Contreras
    Ros, F, and Mendez-Villanueva, A. Effects of hamstring-emphasized neuromuscular training 11 on strength and sprinting mechanics in football players. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 25: e62112 e629. 2015. 13 22. Mero, A. Force-time characteristics and running velocity of male sprinters during the 14 acceleration phase of sprinting. Res Q Exercise Sport. 59: 94-98. 1988. 15 23. Meylan, CMP, Cronin, JB, Oliver, JL, Hopkins, WG, & Contreras, B. The effect of maturation 16 on adaptations to strength training and detraining in 11-15-year-olds. Scand J Med Sci 17 Sports. 24: e156-e164. 2014.