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‘A Meaningful Step towards Accountability’?: A View from the Field on the United Nations International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism for Syria

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Abstract

The new United Nations International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM) is an additional tool in the fight against impunity for the international crimes being committed in Syria. It arrives late and, at first glance, has no additional powers beyond those possessed by the multitude of existing justice actors who have been resolutely documenting crimes and building cases since 2011. Yet there are opportunities and real benefits that could be achieved. In order to live up to its billing as a meaningful step towards accountability, the IIIM will have to be creative and tailor itself to work in partnership with Syrian civil society actors and existing non-governmental organizations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

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