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Purpose This paper aims to explore the impact of workplaces, which support concentration and communication, and self-management practices on individual and team productivity. The underlying hypothesis is that the impact of these variables on the two levels of productivity (individual and team) and the two dimensions of productivity (quantity and quality) may be different. Design/methodology/approach The paper is based on survey data from 998 Finnish knowledge workers. Factor analysis was used to test the dimensions of the conceptual model. Insights into the impact of workplaces for concentration and communications and self-management practices on productivity were obtained by multiple-regression analyses. Findings The findings show that self-management practices have a larger impact on the quality and quantity of individual output and the quantity of team output than workplaces for communication and concentration. Improving self-management skills is key to increase all productivity dimensions and in particular the quality of the output. Practical implications This paper contributes to a better understanding of the impact of workplace characteristics and self-management practices on different levels and dimensions of productivity. It offers valuable lessons for managers, as they are able to recognize how productivity can be approached from several perspectives. Different dimensions can be enhanced using different workplace settings. For example, the quantitative output of employees can be increased by adding more space for concentration, while quantitative team productivity can be increased by providing appropriate space for collaboration. An important means to enhance a higher quality of the output is to improve self-management skills. The findings also suggest that collaboration between different disciplines – corporate management, corporate real estate management, human resource management and IT – is needed to optimize individual and team productivity. Originality/value This paper explores work environment experiences of Finnish office workers and connects both workplace appraisal and work practices to perceived productivity support, on individual level and team level. It also adds insights into the different impacts on quantity and quality.
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... As production is often the prime objective in many organizations and more often management is oriented towards that. Therefore, scientific management is one of the key techniques needed to enhance the level of productivity of academic researchers as regards task efficiency and research publications [1][2][3][4][5][6]. In the modern scientific era, the service sector is predominantly driven by knowledge-based techniques and the digital economy to provide better quality services and enhance the level of productivity during the Pandemic of COVID-19. ...
... Therefore, the prime challenge for management practitioners is to increase the capacity of productivity of knowledgeable workers, solving problems and completing tasks especially in the academic sector during the Pandemic of COVID-19. [3,[5][6][7][8]. As noted earlier, management practitioners and strategists widely focusing on the need to increase the productivity of academic researchers. ...
... They also emphasized evaluating the impacts of the knowledge management process on individuals with concerns about the soft and hard aspects of tasks as recommended in the literature [9]. In such circumstances, evaluating the effects of the knowledge management process on the knowledge-workers productivity among academic researchers (individual workers) could be a novel contribution in the Malaysian academic environment [3][4][5][6]10], which could attract literature attention towards this part of the world during the Pandemic of COVID-19. To this end, the problems in this context are presented in the following passages. ...
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Drucker’s knowledge-worker productivity theory and knowledge-based view of the firm theory are widely employed in many disciplines but there is little application of these theories in knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers. Therefore, this study intends to evaluate the effects of the knowledge management process on knowledge-based innovation alongside with mediating role of Malaysian academic researchers’ productivity during the Pandemic of COVID-19. Using a random sampling technique, data was collected from 382 academic researchers. Questionnaires were self-administered and data was analyzed via Smart PLS-SEM. Knowledge management process and knowledge workers’ productivity have a positive and significant relationship with the knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers during the Pandemic of COVID-19. In addition, knowledge workers’ productivity mediates the relationship between the knowledge management process (knowledge creation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing, and knowledge utilization) and knowledge-based innovation during the Pandemic of COVID-19. Results have also directed knowledge sharing as the key factor in knowledge-based innovation and a stimulating task for management discipline around the world during the Pandemic of COVID-19. This study provides interesting insights on Malaysian academic researchers’ productivity by evaluating the effects of knowledge creation, acquisition, sharing, and application on the knowledge-based innovation among academic researchers during the Pandemic of COVID-19. These useful insights would enable policymakers to develop more influential educational strategies. By assimilating the literature of defined variables, the main contribution of this study is the evaluation of knowledge creation, acquisition, sharing, and utilization into knowledge-based innovation alongside the mediating role of knowledge workers productivity in the higher education sector of Malaysia during the Pandemic of COVID-19.
... The productivity of the knowledge worker may vary widely depending on the work task, contextual factors associated with physical, digital and social work environment dimensions and individual skills and competences (Bosch-Sijtsema et al., 2009). The productivity of knowledge work can be divided into different levels, such as individual and team levels, as well as into quantitative and qualitative dimensions (Palvalin et al., 2017). Analyzing productivity outcomes on the team level could be appropriate when knowledge work is in practice performed as a team or in networks (Bosch-Sijtsema et al., 2009;Nenonen et al., 2009). ...
... Therefore, if these expectations regarding autonomy are not fulfilled, it may cause a negative association overall. Yet, another explanation for the negative association of office presence could be that the physical work environment might not be supportive of wellbeing and productivity if the spatial solution was originally designed mainly for mobile work and does not include the right amount of spaces for privacy and concentration (Van der Voordt, 2004;Appel-Meulenbroek et al., 2011;Riratanaphong and Van der Voordt, 2012;De Been and Beijer, 2014;Brunia et al., 2016;Harris, 2016;Palvalin et al., 2017;Budie et al., 2018;Haapakangas et al., 2018aHaapakangas et al., , 2018bGroen et al., 2019;Hoendervanger et al., 2019;Palvalin, 2019). However, these assumptions need further scrutiny to investigate the causal relationships between different variables. ...
Article
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... Present-day researchers agree on the exponential growth of knowledge workers and their value for business organizations (Acsente, 2010;Kianto et al., 2019;Sahibzada et al., 2020). They are highly significant wealth creators in the present economy (Drucker, 1999;Palvalin et al., 2017). ...
... In the context described above, Kianto et al. (2019) revealed a significant impact of knowledge management on organizational productivity. Additionally, the workplace is a vital factor among the various facets mentioned earlier that influence the productivity of knowledge workers (Palvalin, 2019;Palvalin et al., 2017). Consideringly, renowned academics in management have emphasized the role of organizational factors in knowledge-based strategies to attain sustained competitive advantages (Nonaka, 1994;Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1996;Spender, 1996). ...
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This research investigates the impact of knowledge governance on the knowledge workers' productivity with the mediating role of knowledge sharing through the knowledge governance approach. The study used a quantitative survey-based technique to gather data from one hundred and twenty knowledge workers selected with stratified random sampling. The researchers analyzed the primary data collected through a self-administered survey using an adapted instrument through Smart_PLS software. The partial least square structural equation model results revealed that knowledge governance significantly impacts knowledge sharing and knowledge workers' productivity, respectively. At the same time, knowledge sharing mediates the relationship between knowledge governance and knowledge workers' productivity. The study adds significant value to the theory and literature and carries widespread implications for knowledge workers and knowledge-based organizations. The study provides future directions for further strengthening the knowledge governance approach with similar studies in different contexts and populations for generalization and theory validation.
... Self-management practices have a bigger impact on the standard and quantity of individual output and also the quantity of team output than workplaces for communication and concentration. Improving selfmanagement skills is vital to extend all productivity dimensions and specifically the standard of the output (Palvalin et al., 2017). Manz and Sims (1980) further explicate the positive impact of self-management by concluding Selfmanagement by individual employees will be instrumental in achieving organizational goals and which it's a useful and legit role of the supervisor to develop and encourage capabilities. ...
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Management is not just for organizations. Self-management, if used properly, makes individuals not just survive but also thrive. Similarly, that experience can be elongated to understand the best approach to manage other selves too. This systematic literature review aims to examine the state of existing literature related to the concept of self-management, the role of self-management in different contexts to achieve excellence and finally the strategic perspective of self-management. After a systematic review of the available literature based on a sample of 30 empirical and conceptual studies, it was found that self-management has a positive influence on all the contexts but literature on strategic self-management remains scarce. Hence, the author highlights the importance of future research studies devoted to strategic self-management practices involved in both organizational and institutional contexts.
... There has been a continued debate among scholars for the last decade about openplan versus cellular office environments [47]. While the literature assessing the impact of working in open-plan offices is complex and depends on both leadership and selfmanagement practices, it is clear that shared workspaces must accommodate precise, individual work as well as face-to-face communication [48]. ...
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Effective medical teamwork can improve the effectiveness and experience of care for staff and patients, including safety. Healthcare organizations, and especially primary care clinics, have sought to improve medical teamwork through improved layout and design, moving staff into shared multidisciplinary team rooms. While co-locating staff has been shown to increase communication, successful designs balance four teamwork needs: face-to-face communications; situational awareness; heads-down work; perception of teamness. However, precautions for COVID-19 make it more difficult to conduct face-to-face communications. In this paper we describe a model for understanding how layout affects these four teamwork needs and describe how the perception of teamwork by staff changed after COVID-19 precautions were put in place. Observations, interviews and two standard surveys were conducted in two primary care clinics before COVID-19 and again in 2021 after a year of precautions. In general, staff felt more isolated and found it more difficult to conduct brief consults, though these perceptions varied by role. RNs, who spent more time on the phone, found it convenient to work part time-from home, while medical assistants found it more difficult to find providers in the distanced clinics. These cases suggest some important considerations for future clinic designs, including greater physical transparency that also allow for physical separation and more spaces for informal communication that are distanced from workstations.
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Knowledge workers are increasingly working in multi-team contexts to solve complex business problems. While collaborative work is an indispensable mode of work in multi-team knowledge work, the complementary mode of individual work, i.e. working uninterrupted in solitude, is often overlooked. We aim to better understand individual work and its role within multi-team contexts. Based on a literature review of the office design and telework debates, we provide a detailed account of individual work. Taking this vantage point and putting the task structure centre stage, we conceptualise the interrelation between individual and collaborative work. Specifically, we develop the work types maturation, execution, and meta work to exemplify the bipartite interrelation by depicting their task-bound interplay and time-bound tension. Thereby, we offer a different perspective on ‘cooperative work’ and equip practitioners with a vocabulary to discern the role of and articulate the needed amount for individual work.
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Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on the performance of real estate agents in Prishtina, Kosovo. The study also investigated the relationship of each dimension of emotional intelligence with the real estate agent's performance (REAP) in Prishtina, which is the city with the largest number of real estate agents in Kosovo. Design/methodology/approach The present study used quantitative research with the questionnaire used as a research instrument. The questionnaire survey was conducted with 78 real estate agents in Prishtina, Kosovo. The sampling method used in this research was random sampling. Findings The findings of this study indicated that emotional intelligence has a significant impact on the job performance of real estate agents. The study also found that relationship management (RM) and social awareness (SOA) have a strong effect on real estate agents' performance, whereas self-awareness (SA) does not seem to have any statistically significant explanatory power over REAP. Research limitations/implications This study can be utilized as a landmark for agents of real estate on understanding how the agents can use emotional intelligence in agents' favor by pointing out the prominence of EI in realizing the needs and desires of the potential buyers and the influence EI has on the decision to buy property. Furthermore, through this study, the real estate agencies will be provided with multiple reasons that substantiate the necessity to hire emotionally trained agents, and besides professional preparation, the companies must provide employees with behavioral training. Originality/value The present study is the first quantification of the impact of emotional intelligence and dimensions of emotional intelligence on the performance of Prishtina's real estate agents.
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the associations among knowledge-oriented leadership (KOL), knowledge worker satisfaction (KWS), knowledge worker productivity (KWP) and organizational performance (OP). The study hypothesizes that the explicit mixtures, i.e. KOL, KWS and KWP can improve OP. Design/methodology/approach The study sample was composed of 248 academicians and management staff of higher educational institutes (HEIs). The relations were tested through Smart PLS 3.2.9. The fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) method was also used for examining configurational paths. Findings The study found a substantial direct influence of KOL on OP. The findings revealed that KOL significantly affects KWS, and KWS enhances KWP, which ultimately improves the OP of HEIs. Grounded on the fsQCA, the outcomes exposed configurational trails to the enhanced OP. Originality/value There is scarce of studies that determine the connection of KOL, KWS, KWP and OP. This is one of the preliminary studies that examine the association of KOL, KWS, KWP and OP in HEIs. From a procedural viewpoint, the research subsidizes by merging symmetric and asymmetric tools to further understand structural issues. The use of fsQCA discloses numerous paths to improve OP and renders asymmetric relations. fsQCA also aids to comprehend the relations that might not be directly understandable via symmetric means.
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