Article

Research 2.0 and Research Data Services in academic and research libraries: priority issues

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Abstract

Purpose The role of Research Data Services, consisting of research data management, data curation and data stewardship, and data literacy education in supporting Research 2.0 is examined. Besides this, theory and principles, as well as selected examples of best practices in the relevant fields are presented. Design/methodology/approach A literature-based overview of actual insights on tasks and roles that academic and research libraries have to fulfil in order to react to the developments generated by the appearance and growing importance of Research 2.0 is provided. Taking the wide spectre of related issues into account, the discussion is limited to research data services. Findings Even though Research 2.0 is evolving in different countries and some local environments in dissimilar ways, its data-intensive nature requires the helping presence of academic libraries and librarians. Being an emerging phenomenon, it will undoubtedly take several different shapes as it works itself out in time, but librarians should try to discover service niches, which may not be covered by other academic organizations, or their coverage is only partial or even unsatisfactory. Research limitations/implications Taking the wide spectre of issues into account, the review of literature is limited to the period between 2014 and 2016. Originality/value The paper intends intends to add to the body of knowledge about the relationship between Research Data Services and Research 2.0, as well as about the association between the components of the former.

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... It was also found that academic librarians needed to develop their skills and competencies and become more proactive to successfully be included in the research process when such opportunities presented themselves (Lorenzetti & Rutherford, 2012). A relatively recent literature review indicated similar results, although it focused on research data management (Koltay, 2017). The literature review indicated that researchers did not favor support from the university library and academic librarians because they considered academic librarians as lacking understanding of research data. ...
... More fundamentally, academic librarians did not have a role in research data management, according to the researchers. The study recommended that academic librarians develop skills and competencies in understanding data types and appropriate information technologies (Koltay, 2017). Academic librarians were also recommended to try to identify niches not yet covered, covered partially, or covered unsatisfactory by other university organizations and then to offer appropriate services that satisfy the needs of the researchers. ...
Thesis
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This study aims to better understand the dynamics of negotiating professional jurisdiction within research from the perspective of academic librarians who develop library services for researchers. This qualitative case study consists of 24 semi-structured interviews, 32 recorded non-participant observations, and seven official university library documents collected at one Swedish university library with three division libraries during 2016. The analytical frame is based on Abbott’s (1988) system of professions approach and focuses on changes in professional work. It is assumed that all professions have strong or weak control of jurisdictions, which are described as a profession’s exclusive rights to a task area, including the right to define tasks and relevant professional knowledge. The assumption is that jurisdictions change and are under constant negotiation at the workplace until settled. The settlements range from strong to weak control of jurisdiction. The analytical frame also identifies disturbances in negotiating jurisdiction that can be internal or external to a profession, e.g., new knowledge, organization, and technology. The results show that developing library services for researchers is an ambiguous and complicated task. It is influenced by several constraints and addressed differently by academic librarians. Constraints are related to the task description, organization, management support, communication, academic librarians’ skills and competencies, as well as level of ambition. The results showed that academic librarians can claim jurisdiction within research, although disciplinary differences emerged. Academic librarians at a science and medical library seemed to have more apparent opportunities than academic librarians in humanities and art history or social science libraries to claim jurisdiction within research. The study confirms that access jurisdiction is an acknowledged jurisdiction for academic librarians and is strengthened by new and emerging tasks related to access, e.g., digitization. Access jurisdiction seems to act as a springboard to claim and negotiate jurisdiction within research. The study reveals active push and passive pull dynamics related to negotiating jurisdictions and highlighted communication and information dissemination as an organizational disturbance not previously considered in Abbott's (1988) system of professions approach. In addition, the thesis clarified a need to analyze the work and needs of the profession itself. Persistent link: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-26641
... One notable variable explored in the current study is the relationship between the reported difficulty of a patron interaction and the involvement of a specialized team of reference professionals, particularly those in research data services and special collections units. Dedicated support in libraries for data analysis, visualization, and management has grown considerably in recent years, making research data services an emerging area of academic librarianship extensively explored in the literature (Corrall et al., 2013;Koltay, 2017;Pryor et al., 2013;Si et al., 2015;Swygart-Hobaugh, 2017;Tenopir et al., 2012, Tenopir et al., 2014. Less well examined is the difficulty or complexity of these increasingly frequent research data transactions. ...
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... University of Houston Libraries has taken part in this trend by gradually but steadily establishing RDS, including new positions aimed at addressing research data management, data curation, and stewardship, and data literacy education (Koltay, 2017). To support data literacy education, the libraries hired a social science data librarian in 2014. ...
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Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of work performed at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to set-up a Research Data Management Service and tailor it to the needs of health researchers. Design/methodology/approach – The paper describes the motivations for establishing the RDM Service and outlines the three objectives that were set to improve data management practice within the institution. Each of the objectives are explored in turn, stating how they were addressed. Findings – A university with limited resources can operate a RDM Service that pro-actively supports researchers wishing to manage research data by monitoring evolving support needs, identifying common trends and developing resources that will reduce the time investment needed. The institution-wide survey identified a need for guidance on developing data documentation and archiving research data following project completion. Analysis of ongoing support requests identifies a need for guidance on data management plans and complying with journal sharing requirements. Research limitations/implications – The paper provides a case study of a single institution. The results may not be generally applicable to universities that support other disciplines. Practical implications – The case study may be helpful in helping other universities to establish an RDM Service using limited resources. Originality/value – The paper outlines how the evolving data management needs of public health researchers can be identified and a strategy that can be adopted by an RDM Service to efficiently address these requirements.
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how knowledge of local research data management (RDM) practices critically informs the progressive development of research data services (RDS) after basic services have already been established. Design/methodology/approach – An online survey was distributed via e-mail to all university faculty in the fall of 2013, and was left open for just over one month. The authors sent two reminder e-mails before closing the survey. Survey data were downloaded from Qualtrics survey software and analyzed in R. Findings – In this paper, the authors reviewed a subset of survey findings that included data types, volume, and storage locations, RDM roles and responsibilities, and metadata practices. The authors found that Oregon State University (OSU) researchers are generating a wide variety of data types, and that practices vary between colleges. The authors discovered that faculty are not utilizing campus-wide storage infrastructure, and are maintaining their own storage servers in surprising numbers. Faculty-level research assistants perform the majority of data-related tasks at OSU, with the exception of data sharing, which is primarily handled by the professorial ranks. The authors found that many faculty on campus are creating metadata, but that there is a need to provide support in how to discover and create standardized metadata. Originality/value – This paper presents a novel example of how to efficiently move from establishing basic RDM services to providing more focussed services that meet specific local needs. It provides an approach for others to follow when tackling the difficult question of, “What next?” with regard to providing academic RDS.
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between research data management (RDM) and data sharing in the formulation of RDM policies and development of practices in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). Design/methodology/approach – Two strands of work were undertaken sequentially: first, content analysis of 37 RDM policies from UK HEIs; and second, two detailed case studies of institutions with different approaches to RDM based on semi-structured interviews with staff involved in the development of RDM policy and services. The data are interpreted using insights from Actor Network Theory. Findings – RDM policy formation and service development has created a complex set of networks within and beyond institutions involving different professional groups with widely varying priorities shaping activities. Data sharing is considered an important activity in the policies and services of HEIs studied, but its prominence can in most cases be attributed to the positions adopted by large research funders. Research limitations/implications – The case studies, as research based on qualitative data, cannot be assumed to be universally applicable but do illustrate a variety of issues and challenges experienced more generally, particularly in the UK. Practical implications – The research may help to inform development of policy and practice in RDM in HEIs and funder organisations. Originality/value – This paper makes an early contribution to the RDM literature on the specific topic of the relationship between RDM policy and services, and openness – a topic which to date has received limited attention.
Article
Purpose The purpose of the paper is to describe the evolution to date and future directions in research data policy, infrastructure, skills development and advisory services in an Australian university, with a focus on the role of librarians. Design/methodology/approach The authors have been involved in the development of research data services at Griffith, and the case study presents observations and reflections arising from their first-hand experiences. Findings Griffith University's organisational structure and 'whole-of-enterprise' approach has facilitated service development to support research data. Fostering strong national partnerships has also accelerated development of institutional capability. Policies and strategies are supported by pragmatic best practice guidelines aimed directly at researchers. Iterative software development and a commitment to well-supported enterprise infrastructure enable the provision of a range of data management solutions. Training programs, repository support and data planning services are still relatively immature. Griffith recognises that information services staff (including librarians) will need more opportunities to develop knowledge and skills to support these services as they evolve. Originality/value This case study provides examples of library-led and library-supported activities that could be used for comparative purposes by other libraries. At the same time, it provides a critical perspective by contrasting areas of good practice within the University with those of less satisfactory progress. While other institutions may have different constraints or opportunities, some of the major concepts within this paper may prove useful to advance the development of research data capability and capacity across the library profession.
Article
The research obtained information to plan data-related products and services. Biomedical researchers in an academic medical center were selected using purposive sampling and interviewed using open-ended questions based on a literature review. Interviews were conducted until saturation was achieved. Interview responses informed library planners about researchers' key data issues. This approach proved valuable for planning data management products and services and raising library visibility among clients in the research data realm.
Article
Much of the recent research on digital data repositories has focused on assessing either the trustworthiness of the repository or quantifying the frequency of data reuse. Satisfaction with the data reuse experience, however, has not been widely studied. Drawing from the information systems and information science literature, we developed a model to examine the relationship between data quality and data reusers' satisfaction. Based on a survey of 1,480 journal article authors who cited Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) data in published papers from 2008–2012, we found several data quality attributes—completeness, accessibility, ease of operation, and credibility—had significant positive associations with data reusers' satisfaction. There was also a significant positive relationship between documentation quality and data reusers' satisfaction.
Article
The objective of this research was to investigate the institutional and individual factors that influence scientists' data-sharing behaviors across different scientific disciplines. Two theoretical perspectives, institutional theory, and theory of planned behavior, were employed in developing a research model that showed the complementary nature of the institutional and individual factors influencing scientists' data-sharing behaviors. This research used a survey method to examine to what extent those institutional and individual factors influence scientists' data-sharing behaviors in a range of scientific disciplines. A national survey (with 1,317 scientists in 43 disciplines) showed that regulative pressure by journals, normative pressure at a discipline level, and perceived career benefit and scholarly altruism at an individual level had significant positive relationships with data-sharing behaviors, and that perceived effort had a significant negative relationship. Regulative pressure by funding agencies and the availability of data repositories at a discipline level and perceived career risk at an individual level were not found to have any significant relationships with data-sharing behaviors.
Article
Purpose – The role of data literacy is discussed in the light of such activities as data a quality, data management, data curation, and data citation. The differing terms and their relationship to the most important literacies are examined. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – By stressing the importance of data literacy in fulfilling the mission of the contemporary academic library, the paper centres on information literacy, while the characteristics of other relevant literacies are also examined. The content of data literacy education is explained in the context of data-related activities. Findings – It can be concluded that there is a need for data literacy and it is advantageous to have a unified terminology. Data literacy can be offered both to researchers, who need to become data literate science workers and have the goal to educate data management professionals. Several lists of competencies contain important skills and abilities, many of them indicating the close relationship between data literacy and information literacy. It is vital to take a critical stance on hopes and fears, related to the promises of widespread ability of (big) data. Originality/value – The paper intends to be an add-on to the body of knowledge about information literacy and other literacies in the light of research data and data literacy.
Article
The focus of this article is to reflect on current and near future issues and trends concerning academic libraries. This includes an overview of the literature on embedded librarianship and a focus on the need for more participatory and collaborative approaches to library services.The core argument is that academic libraries need to continue to adapt their roles and develop stronger relationships across the university in order to maintain and promote their relevancy to all stakeholders. Embedded roles in research and teaching, and an embedded existence through collaboration and outreach will strengthen the academic library's presence within its parent institution.
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to better understand the data practices, influences and needs of researchers at a major public research institution. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on the results of a pre-tested, web-based survey of University of Kansas faculty, staff, researchers and graduate students. Findings – Influences on data practices and data needs vary with the research methodology and academic discipline of the researcher. Practical implications – Academic libraries may need to adjust the services they offer to meet the varying needs of researchers in differing disciplines using differing methodologies. Originality/value – This study adds to the developing literature describing research data management.
Article
The conclusions of research articles generally depend on bodies of data that cannot be included in the articles themselves. The sharing of this data is important for reasons of both transparency and possible reuse. Science, Technology and Medicine journals have an obvious role in facilitating sharing, but how they might do that is not yet clear. The Journal Research Data (JoRD) Project was a JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) funded feasibility study on the possible shape of a central service on journal research data ...
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