ArticlePDF Available

Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe

Authors:
  • Landward Research Ltd

Abstract

Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe is a major research project that examined the archaeological labour market, qualifications and opportunities for archaeologists to enjoy transnational mobility across twelve European Union member states. The research was carried out in 2007-08 and was primarily funded by the European Commission through the Lifelong Learning Programme (Leonardo da Vinci II strand).
... Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe 2014, a Europe-wide survey has recently (2012–14) been conducted on the archaeological profession (Aitchison et al. 2014) (Figure 1). Comparable information was collected through questionnaires in 21 European countries addressing workforce size, age and gender patterns, disability status, countries of origin (mobility), contracts (full-time or part-time), average salaries, and qualifications. ...
... In several countries women already form the majority of the archaeological workforce, such as in Greece where 76% of archaeologists are women, Italy where 71% are, Cyprus 68%, Slovenia and Norway 63%. In other countries males dominate; 64% of Romanian archaeologists are men, in Poland the figure is 61% and also in Flanders (61% male) (Aitchison et al. 2014). These figures need to be contextualised in order to fully understand separate or common issues on gender equality. ...
... Among the permanently employed, the gender distribution is more even, with 52.7% women and 47.3% men. However, men form the majority of archaeologists aged 41 years and older as a whole, which is unsurprising considering the trans-European trend of older male to younger female archaeologists (Aitchison et al. 2014) (Table 3). The ratios of women to men differ somewhat when seen in light of employment type and age. ...
Article
Full-text available
A recent study into the archaeological profession in 21 European countries resulted in recognising gender equality as a major topic that needs attention. The overall trend is that women will form the future majority of workers in archaeology. However, the conditions under which women work differ by country, and in several countries, women are paid less and are not well represented in leadership positions. Gender equality needs to be put on the agenda and each country should take measurements to close the gap.
... eu. In addition to these, two transnational reports were produced—one comparing the results across the 12 states (Aitchison 2009a) and one comparing quali fi cations (Collis 2009) . ...
Chapter
Full-text available
One of the principal objectives of the European Union (EU) is to allow the free movement of labour. In the early years of the twenty-first century, increasing numbers of archaeologists sought to take advantage of opportunities other than their own, and the Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe project sought to examine how this mobility of individual workers was affecting archaeological practice in Europe.
... The 2007-08 study was also part of a larger Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe project (Aitchison 2009a), which collected comparable data in twelve European states. This has allowed the UK profession's position within an international industry (and market) to be identified. ...
Book
Full-text available
Comprehensive Labour Market Intelligence for the archaeological profession has now been gathered for the fourth time in the series of Profiling the Profession studies. This baseline survey used the same fundamental methodology that was previously employed in 1997-98, 2002-03 and 2007-08, and consequently a time-series dataset has been compiled which allows trends to be identified with increasing confidence. The previous labour market intelligence gathering exercise for the sector (in 2007-08) was undertaken immediately before the effects of significant global and national economic changes began to affect archaeological employment. The economic transformation since 2007-08 significantly affected employment in archaeology, resulting in the sector being considerably smaller in 2012-13 than it was in 2007-08. With an overall response rate of 224 from a population of 511 potential respondents contacted, at a confidence level of 95% this level of response is accurate to +/- 4.9%.
Book
Full-text available
This book is a revised and updated version of the monograph Historija arheologije u novim zemljama Jugoistočne Evrope, originally published in Sarajevo in the Bosnian language. It is divided into chapters dedicated to the seven new countries created after the break-up of Yugoslavia and their archaeologies, with the final chapter reflecting the concept of ‘Yugoslav’ archaeology. Each chapter starts with a brief geographical, archaeological and historical introduction of the country in question. In the English edition, these parts are somewhat enlarged to help readers who are not well acquainted with the geography, archaeology and history of the region to contextualise the subject of study better. The main goal of the monograph is a reflection on the development of archaeology and the historical, social and cultural conditions of its knowledge.
Article
This study focuses on the organization of preventive archaeology in Romania and several other European countries over the last fifteen years. It provides data comparing the number and density of archaeological sites in Romania identified as a result of large-scale investment projects. It also discusses some important aspects regarding the financial and human resources involved in preventive archaeological excavations in Romania and other European countries. The paper attempts to outline the steps that need to be taken in Romania to ensure the continuing preservation of archaeology. These are: 1. A proper understanding of the importance of certain sites in comparison to others; 2. An accurate understanding of the importance of Article 9 of the Valletta Convention, which focuses on the concept of ‘public awareness’; 3. Prioritizing archaeological projects with useful results; 4. The creation of accurate digital databases, using GIS platforms. Ultimately, it is argued that we need to excavate, but we need even more to preserve, capitalize, and promote the archaeological patrimony, to facilitate the access of the public to archaeological sites, and to make people understand why it is crucial to protect our monuments.
Book
Full-text available
Comprehensive Labour Market Intelligence for the archaeological profession has now been gathered for the fourth time in the series of Profiling the Profession studies. This baseline survey used the same fundamental methodology that was previously employed in 1997‐98, 2002‐03 and 2007‐08, and consequently a time‐series dataset has been compiled which allows trends to be identified with increasing confidence. The previous labour market intelligence gathering exercise for the sector (in 2007‐08) was undertaken immediately before the effects of significant global and national economic changes began to affect archaeological employment. The economic transformation since 2007‐08 significantly affected employment in archaeology, resulting in the sector being considerably smaller in 2012‐13 than it was in 2007‐08. With an overall response rate of 224 from a population of 511 potential respondents contacted, at a confidence level of 95% this level of response is accurate to +/‐ 4.9%.
Chapter
Economic development activities globally have increasingly severe consequences for the practice of archaeology. Archaeologists’ ambivalent views on engaging with development, however, affect the prospects for improvement of living standards the communities in which we work, and for the ability of the discipline to influence the powerful corporate, financial, and political forces behind development efforts. This volume explores, through theoretical, ethical, and case study analysis, the challenging choices facing the discipline in a fast-developing world: Is it better to collaborate with development forces in order to preserve heritage and the archaeological record and, perhaps to support local communities? Or is it better to contend with demands for economic growth and so collide with potentially irresistible demands. This chapter presents the context in which these issues must be considered, and reviews the themes arising from the chapters in this volume, which in the aggregate evaluate the question of Collision or Collaboration from a global perspective.
Article
Full-text available
Sowohl für ArchäologInnen als auch sonstige BürgerInnen ist es von essentieller Bedeutung zu wissen, unter welchen Umständen archäologische Feldforschungsmaßnahmen den Bestimmungen des § 11 Abs. 1 DMSG und damit einer gesetzlichen Bewilligungspflicht durch das BDA unterliegen.
Article
This paper investigates perceptions of ethnicity, religion and language within the archaeological community of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Research was conducted using responses to an appendix (consisting of six questions) to questionnaires distributed as a part of the project, Discovering the Archaeologists of Europe 2012–2014: Bosnia and Herzegovina, implemented by Cultural Heritage without Borders, Sarajevo, between 2012 and 2014, as well as the core data collected within the questionnaire itself. After presentation and analysis, the data are compared with two preexisting datasets: similar research conducted during 2009–2010 within Bosnia and Herzegovina’s archaeological community; and, where comparable data have been collected, the views obtained for the Bosnia and Herzegovina component of the project Strategies of symbolic nation-building in West Balkan states in late 2011. Although a census was undertaken within Bosnia and Herzegovina throughout September 2013—the first since 1991—the results were not publicly available at the time of writing.
Article
Full-text available
Archäologie und Baudenkmalpflege in Nordrhein-Westfalen (NRW) wurden 2013 mit Plänen zu einschneidenden Kürzungen ihrer staatlichen Finanzierung konfrontiert. Eine gegen diese Pläne gerichtete, von der DGUF initiierte öffentliche Petition fand breite Unterstützung bei den Bürgern und konnte die beabsichtigten Kürzungen spürbar abmildern. Dennoch zeigen Vergleiche, dass sich das Land NRW seit langem stark aus der Finanzierung von Archäologie und Baudenkmalpflege zurückzieht und die aktuelle Finanzierung nicht hinreichend ist. Im Bereich der Archäologie beschäftigen andere europäische Regionen im Durchschnitt drei Mal so viele Archäologen wie NRW. In der Baudenkmalpflege fokussiert die neue Förderung des Landes NRW implizit auf Denkmäler in ökonomisch attraktiven Lagen, während es im ländlichen Raum und bei den Kirchenbauten in Zukunft vermehrt zu Denkmalverlusten kommen wird. Ebenfalls im Jahr 2013 wurde in NRW das Denkmalschutzgesetz (DSchG) novelliert, wobei insbesondere ein Schatzregal und das Verursacherprinzip eingeführt worden sind. Doch die daraus resultierende Stärkung der Archäologie im Land kommt nur begrenzt zum Tragen, da die Mitte 2014 erlassenen Ausführungsbestimmungen zum DSchG dessen Potenzial nicht ausschöpfen. Sie schränken das neu eingeführte Schatzregal sogar erheblich und fachlich untauglich ein. Vor allem überrascht angesichts der Sparwünsche der Landespolitik, dass bei Rettungsgrabungen die Kostenübernahme durch die Verursacher ohne Not und gegen europäische Regelungen stark begrenzt wird. Zudem belasten unklare Regelwerke die Zusammenarbeit mit ehrenamtlich Engagierten, was dazu beitragen wird, die Akzeptanz von Archäologie und Baudenkmalpflege bei den Bürgern zu verringern.
Article
Full-text available
Archaeology in 2009 is being adversely affected by a global economic crisis. This has followed a period of successful expansion of practice in many countries, and is now leading to reductions in budgets and job losses. Countries that have adopted a market-facing, commercial system to deliver archaeological management have been more seriously affected than those where the state has retained control over this process. In many states, capital expenditure by governments on infrastructure projects is supporting some archaeological practice. Government commitment to funding archaeological practice is likely to be unsustainable in the long-term, and post-crisis a return to private-sector funding of flexible commercial archaeological practice can be expected.
Article
Becoming an Archaeologist: A Guide to Professional Pathways is an engaging handbook on career paths in the area of archaeology. It outlines in straightforward fashion the entire process of getting a job in archaeology, including the various options; the training that is required; and how to get positions in the academic, commercial and government worlds. It also includes discussion of careers in related heritage professions such as museums and conservation societies. The book includes a series of interviews with real archaeologists, all young professionals who began their careers within the last ten years. These insider guides offer essential tips on how they got their first job and progressed in their careers. Written in an accessible style, the book is essential reading for anyone interested in the realities of archaeology in the 21st century.
Discovering the archaeologists of Europe: Austria. http:// www. discovering-archaeologists. eu/ national_ reports/ DISCO_ national_ Austria_ English. final. pdf
  • R Karl
The labour market for archaeologists in Belgium 2007-08. http:// www. discovering-archaeologists. eu/ national_ reports/ DISCO_ national_ Belgium_ English_ final. pdf. In Flemish: http:// www. discovering-archaeologists. eu/ national_ reports/ DISCO_ national_ Belgium_ Flemish_ final. pdf
  • M Lodewijckx
Discovering the archaeologists of Europe The case of Cyprus
  • E Alphas
  • D Pilides
Discovering the archaeologists of Europe: Greece. http:// www. discovering-archaeologists. eu/ national_ reports/ DISCO_ EL_ national_ English. pdf. In Greek: http:// www. discovering-archaeologists
  • P Pantos
  • A Papadimitriou
  • A Kossyva