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Total Repetitions Per Set Effects Repetitions in Reserve-based Rating of Perceived Exertion Accuracy: 3648 Board #95 June 3 8

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Total Repetitions Per Set Effects Repetitions in Reserve-based Rating of Perceived Exertion Accuracy: 3648 Board #95 June 3 8

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3648 Board #95 June 3 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Total Repetitions Per Set Effects Repetitions in Reserve-based Rating of Perceived Exertion Accuracy
Jared H. Perlmutter1, Jacob A. Goldsmith1, Daniel M. Cooke1, Ryan K. Byrnes1, Michael H. Haischer1, Jose C. Velazquez1, Adam Sayih1, Eric
R. Helms1, Chad Dolan2, Michael C. Zourdos1. 1Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL. 2University of Houston, Houston, TX. (Sponsor:
Michael Whitehurst, FACSM)
Email: jperlmu1@my.fau.edu
(No relationships reported)
The resistance training-specific rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale measuring repetitions in reserve (RIR) has been validated to gauge effort per set in resistance
exercise. However, it is unknown what descriptive factors of the lifter influence RPE/RIR accuracy.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between total repetitions per set and the accuracy of intra-set RPEs of 5, 7, and 9 on the 1-10 RIR-
based RPE scale.
METHODS: Twenty-five college-aged and resistance trained men (Age: 25±3yrs, Body Mass: 88.95±14.72kg) performed a one-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat
followed by one set of maximum repetitions at 70% of 1RM. Subjects were blinded to the load during the 70% set via an opaque trash bag covering the weight discs. During
the 70% set subjects verbally called a 5RPE (i.e. 5RIR), 7RPE (i.e. 3RIR), and 9RPE (i.e. 1RIR) when the subject believed he was at the respective threshold. Pearson
product moment correlations were used to assess relationships between total repetitions performed and the absolute RIR difference from the actual RIR when each RPE was
verbally called. For example, if a subject completed 15 total repetitions and called a 5RPE after 7 repetitions then the RIR difference would equal 3.
RESULTS: Average squat 1RM was 175.76±34.68kg and the mean number of repetitions performed at 70% of 1RM was 16±4. There were moderate and significant
correlations between total repetitions performed and the RIR difference at the called 5RPE (r=0.64, p=0.01) and 7RPE (r=0.56, p=0.004), however no relationship between
total repetitions and the RIR difference existed at the called 9RPE (r=0.01, p=0.97).
CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the greater amount of repetitions performed per set is related to increased difficulty to accurately gauge RIR further from failure.
However, total repetitions per set do not seem to effect RIR accuracy when close to failure (i.e. 9RPE).
3649 Board #96 June 3 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
The Role of the Rating of Perceived Exertion Template in Pacing
Jos J. de Koning, FACSM1, Wouter Schallig1, Tim Veneman1, Dionne A. Noordhof1, José A. Rodriguez-Marroyo2, John P. Porcari, FACSM3,
Carl Foster, FACSM3. 1Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. 2University of León, León, Spain. 3University of Wisconsin - La Crosse, La
Crosse, WI.
Email: j.j.de.koning@vu.nl
(No relationships reported)
The Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) template is thought to regulate pacing and has been shown to be very robust in different circumstances.
PURPOSE: The primary purpose was to investigate whether the RPE template can be manipulated by changing the anticipated race distance during the course of a time trial.
The secondary purpose was to study how athletes cope with this manipulation, especially in terms of the RPE template.
METHOD: Trained male cyclists (N=10) performed three cycling time trials: a 10 km (TT10), a 15 km (TT15) and a manipulated 15 km (TTman). During the TTman, subjects
started the time trial believing that they were going to perform a 10-km time trial. However, at 7.5 km they were told that it was a 15-km time trial.
RESULTS: A significant main effect of time-trial condition on RPE scores until kilometer 7.5 was found (P=0.016). Post-hoc comparisons showed that the RPE values of the
TT15 were lower than the RPE values of the TT10 (Diff:0.60; CI:0.11, 1.0) and TTman (Diff:0.73; CI:0.004, 1.5). After the 7.5 km, a transition phase occurs, in which an
interaction effect is present (P=0.011). After this transition phase, the RPE values of TTman and TT15 did not statistically differ (P=1.00).
CONCLUSIONS: This novel distance-endpoint manipulation demonstrates that it is possible to switch between RPE templates. A clear shift in RPE during the TTman is
present between the RPE template of the TT10 and TT15. The shift strongly supports suggestions that pacing is regulated using a RPE template.
3650 Board #97 June 3 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Perceived Exertion Compared to Physiological Exertion over the course of Two Different Exercise Interventions
Adam C. Lowe1, Neil M. Johannsen1, Conrad P. Earnest, FACSM2, Catrine Tudor-Locke, FACSM3, Melissa Harris4, Timothy S. Church4, Corby
K. Martin4. 1Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. 2Texas A&M University, College Station, TX. 3University of Massachusetts, Amherst,
MA. 4Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA. (Sponsor: Catrine Tudor-Locke, FACSM)
(No relationships reported)
PURPOSE: To evaluate the differences in perceived exertion (RPE) and cardiovascular intensity (%HRmax), and to determine the differences in metabolic stress (RER)
during two exercise interventions following guidelines for (1) general health and (2) weight loss.
METHODS: Sedentary, overweight or obese men and women (N=133; age 47.68, range 21-65 y) were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups for 24wks.
Exercise for general health and weight loss was prescribed at 8 and 20 kcal/kg body weight per week. Exercise was performed at a target HR associated with 65% and 85%
of peak oxygen consumption (average HR% = 76.6±6.3%). HR and RPE were recorded every 5min during exercise. Respiratory values (VO2, VCO2, and RER) were
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