Article

KETOGENIC DIET IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES

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Abstract

People try different diet plans for diabetes. Among the most popular diet plans, Ketogenic diet is the most popular one for diabetic patients. Ketogenic diet improves health through a metabolic switch in the primary cellular fuel source to which one’s body and brain are adapted. When metabolism switches from relying on carbohydrate-based fuels (glucose from starch and sugar) to fat-based fuels, fat metabolism products are formed which are called ketones which promote positive changes in the cells, and this translates into better overall health. Ketosis is simply a normal metabolic pathway in which body and brain cells utilize ketones to make energy, instead of relying on only sugar (carbohydrates). Ketogenic diet has broader uses apart from Diabetes which can treat medical conditions such as Autism, Epilepsy, Cancer, and Alzheimer's as well. The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels and minimizing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and in large quantities, can cause spikes in the blood sugar levels.

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... Some researchers suggest that there are no metabolic advantages with low carbohydrate diets and that weight loss results simply from reduced caloric intake, probably due to the increased satiety effect of protein 7 . However, the majority of ad libitum studies 8 demonstrate that individuals who follow a low-carbohydrate diet lose more weight during the first 3-6 months compared with those who follow more balanced diets 4 . ...
Article
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Ezrin C, Kowalski RE. The type II diabetes diet book. Los Angeles, CA: Lowell House, 1995.
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