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The Other Book Addiction: A Thinking Disease

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The Other Book Addiction: A Thinking Disease

Abstract

Challenges the current paradigm regarding addiction as a chronically relapsing brain disease (Brain Disease Model of Addiction BDMA). Creates a more plausible paradigm encompassing early trauma induced emotional dysregulation through the limbic system coopting the normal frontal and prefrontal cortex as the executive decision maker. Separates the software "mind" from the "hardware" brain and addresses treatment options.
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