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Abstract

The main question that this article attempts to answer is: Why women do not develope software? The article presents five concentric rings which when combined make up our hypotheses regarding how to build female gender segregation in software production processes. We will first discuss the relationship between gender and technology in general by focusing on women early socialization. Second, we will analyze the first approaches to digital technology in particular. The third level corresponds to puberty and in it we explore the emotional dynamics that are established with respect to their peer groups who devote many hours to computers. The fourth level analyzes the gender gap in university programmes related to computer science. The fifth and final addresses the gender representations that those who hire informatic workers have.

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Gender Stereotypes in Children's Television Cartoons
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