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Oral pathology associated with dry mouth

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Abstract

Dry mouth syndrome is a major health problem that causes intense functional abnormalities and oral lesions of organic nature. Functional alterations are the first to appear. There is a difficulty in chewing, swallowing, speech and impaired uptake of taste. These problem scan trigger changes in diet and even compromise nutritional status. Organic oral lesions cause analtered oral mucosa appears bright, dry, erythematous, tender, sore and sometimes friable, facilitates the development of caries, rapidly evolving and preferably cervical location, periodontal disease, discomfort with the prosthetic use, predisposition to infections, especially candidiasis, halitosis and even extraoral manifestations.

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