ArticlePDF Available

Nouveaux médias sociaux, nouveaux comportements de sommeil chez les adolescents

Authors:
  • Réseau Morphée

Abstract and Figures

Objective: Modification of sleep behaviors in teenagers has been observed over the past 30years with a reduction in overall sleep time and an increasing number of teenagers suffering from sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is linked to physical problems such as obesity but also to change in performance at school and mood disorders. Changes have been associated with the use of screens, cell phones, Internet and social media. Use of screens has been shown to delay sleep onset and melatonin secretion and stimulation of wake systems by interaction with social media may exacerbate these effects. The links between the use of social media and sleep patterns have not been fully explored. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of social media on teenagers' sleep and the impact of sleep deprivation. Methodology: As part of a sleep education program conducted in middle schools, teenagers from 6th to 9th grade were invited to complete an online questionnaire on sleep habits with teacher supervision and after parental consent. Outcome measures were sleep and wake times with estimated sleep duration in school (SP) and rest periods (RP), use of screens (computers, tablets, smartphones and video game consoles), the use of social media and impact on visual analogue scales of sleep quality, mood and daytime functioning. Students were divided into those with clear sleep deprivation (sleep time<6hours in SP) and those whose sleep time was in line with the National Sleep Foundations recommended sleep needs for teenagers (9hours or more). Results: A total of 786 questionnaires were completed and 776 were exploitable. Four schools took part with 408/786 girls (64.2 %) and a mean age of 12.4±1.24. Internet access was almost universal (98.3 %), 85.2 % had cell phones and 42.7 % had a personal computer in their bedroom. Social media was used by 64.6 %. After dinner, 52.6 % spent more than an hour and 14.7 % spent more than 2hours in front of a screen. After bedtime, 51.7 % regularly used electronic devices of which 25.6 % had a screen-based activity (e.g. texts, social media, video games or television). During the night, some teens woke up to continue screen-based activities: 6.1 % in order to play online video games, 15.3 % to send texts and 11 % to use social media. Bedtimes were later in PR compared with PS (22h06±132 vs. 23h54±02; P<0.0001) as were wake times (7h06±36 vs. 10h06±102; P<0.0001). Sleep time was clearly longer in PR (10h12±126 P<0.0001) compared to PS. For students in 6th grade compared to 9th grade in sleep duration in SP decreased (8:55±90 vs. 7:25±93; P<0.0001), whereas sleep duration during RP was stable (10h08±118 vs. 10h08±90 P<0.029). No significant difference was found between girls and boys for sleep duration, sleep quality, performance during the day or mood. Sleep deprivation during the week (6hours or less) was less common in 6th graders 5 % vs. 15 % (P<0.0001). In sleep deprived teens compared to teens sleeping, the recommended ≥9hours, difficulties falling asleep were reported with 33 % vs. 9 % taking over an hour to fall asleep (P<0.0001) and difficulties getting up in the morning were more common (7.05±3.27 vs. 5.74±2.97; P=0.0003). Sleep deprivation had an effect on daytime performance: teenagers deprived of sleep were more likely to report a need to fight sleepiness, (5.93±3.24 vs. 2.84±2.44 P<0.0001) and had reduced energy during the day (6.21±2.86 vs. 7.77±2.07 P<0.0001). A negative effect on mood was evident: in sleep, deprived teenagers irritability (5.28±3.12 vs. 3.30±2.34; P<0.0001) and feelings of sadness (3.97±2.99 vs. 2.59±2.15; P=0.003) were more common. There was a clear association between sleep deprivation and access to screens and social media: sleep deprived teens were at more risk of nocturnal disruption with a higher prevalence of computers (67 % vs. 33 %; P<0.0001), cell phones (99 % vs. 80 %; P=0.0001) and smart phones (85 % vs. 66 %; P=0.0001) in their bedrooms. Conclusions: Access to social media and especially a cell phone in teenagers' bedrooms is associated with a reduction in sleep time during the school week with negative effects on daily functioning and mood which increases with increasing age. Education about use of social media and sleep for teenagers needs to start early as modifications in sleep and evening use of screens was present on our population from 11years on and to involve parents as setting parent controlled bedtimes has been shown to increase teenage sleep time.
Content may be subject to copyright.
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
Disponible
en
ligne
sur
ScienceDirect
www.sciencedirect.com
Article
de
recherche
Nouveaux
médias
sociaux,
nouveaux
comportements
de
sommeil
chez
les
adolescents
The
use
of
social
media
modifies
teenagers’
sleep-related
behavior
S.
Royant-Parolaa,,b,c,
V.
Londea,d,
S.
Tréhouta,
S.
Hartleya,d
aRéseau-Morphée,
2,
Grande
Rue,
92380
Garches,
France
bNightingale
hospital,
château
de
Garches,
92380
Garches,
France
cHôpital
Antoine-Béclère,
AP–HP,
sleep
disorders
center,
Clamart,
France
dHôpital
Raymond-Poincaré,
AP–HP,
sleep
center,
EA
4047,
université
de
Versailles
Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines,
92380
Garches,
France
i
n
f
o
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
Historique
de
l’article
:
Rec¸
u
le
11
janvier
2017
Accepté
le
29
mars
2017
Disponible
sur
Internet
le
8
juin
2017
Mots
clés
:
Adolescents
Sommeil
Privation
de
sommeil
Écrans
Smartphone
Lumière
Internet
Réseaux
sociaux
r
é
s
u
m
é
Objectifs.
Évaluer
l’effet
des
nouveaux
médias
sur
le
sommeil
et
fonctionnement
diurne
des
collégiens.
Méthodologie.
Étude
observationnelle
des
adolescents
recrutés
en
collège
(6eà
la
3e)
par
un
question-
naire
en
ligne
sur
le
rythme
veille
sommeil,
la
durée
du
sommeil
en
période
scolaire
et
de
repos
(PS
vs
PR),
l’utilisation
des
nouveaux
médias
et
l’impact
(par
échelle
visuo-analogique)
sur
la
qualité
du
sommeil,
l’humeur
et
le
fonctionnement
diurne.
Résultats.
Au
total,
786
questionnaires
ont
été
recueillis
:
l’âge
moyen
est
12,4
±
1,24
dont
408
filles
(64,2
%).
Parmi,
64,6
%
sont
sur
les
réseaux
sociaux,
57,1
%
utilisant
un
appareil
électronique
au
coucher
avec
des
réveils
intra-sommeil
pour
jeux
(6,1
%),
SMS
(15,3
%)
et
réseaux
sociaux
(11
%).
Les
horaires
de
sommeil
sont
plus
tôt
en
PS
:
coucher
(22h06
±
132
vs
23h54
±
02
p
<
0,0001)
et
lever
(7h06
±
36
vs
10h06
±
102
p
<
0,0001)
avec
une
durée
de
sommeil
réduite
en
PS
(8h30
±
102
vs
10h12
±
126
p
<
0,0001).
Les
horaires
de
coucher
et
de
lever
sont
plus
tardifs
chez
les
plus
âgés
(r
PS
=
0,464
et
r
PR
=
0,300
;
p
<
0,0001).
Une
privation
de
sommeil
(6
heures)
est
plus
fréquente
en
3e,
15
%
vs
5
%
des
6ep
<
0,0001.
Les
privés
de
sommeil
ont
plus
de
difficultés
au
lever
(7,05
±
3,27
vs
5,74
±
2,97
;
p
=
0,0003),
de
somno-
lence
diurne
(5,93
±
3,24
vs
2,84
±
2,44
p
<
0,0001),
d’irritabilité
(5,28
±
3,12
vs
3,30
±
2,34
p
<
0,0001)
et
de
tristesse
(3,97
±
2,99
vs
2,59
±
2,15
p
=
0,003).
L’utilisation
d’un
ordinateur
(67
vs
33
%
p
<
0,0001),
du
téléphone
portable
(99
%
vs
80
%
p
=
0,0001)
ou
du
smartphone
(85
%
vs
66
%
p
=
0,0001)
est
plus
fréquente
chez
les
privés
de
sommeil.
Conclusions.
La
présence
des
nouveaux
médias
dans
la
chambre
est
associée
à
un
temps
de
sommeil
réduit
en
période
scolaire
et
des
effets
négatifs
sur
le
fonctionnement
diurne
et
l’humeur.
Une
éducation
sur
le
sommeil
est
à
structurer
avec
les
parents
et
le
milieu
scolaire.
©
2017
L’Enc´
ephale,
Paris.
Keywords:
Teenagers
Sleep
Sleep
deprivation
Screen
Smartphone
Social
media
Light
Internet
a
b
s
t
r
a
c
t
Objective.
Modification
of
sleep
behaviors
in
teenagers
has
been
observed
over
the
past
30
years
with
a
reduction
in
overall
sleep
time
and
an
increasing
number
of
teenagers
suffering
from
sleep
deprivation.
Sleep
deprivation
is
linked
to
physical
problems
such
as
obesity
but
also
to
change
in
performance
at
school
and
mood
disorders.
Changes
have
been
associated
with
the
use
of
screens,
cell
phones,
Internet
and
social
media.
Use
of
screens
has
been
shown
to
delay
sleep
onset
and
melatonin
secretion
and
stimulation
of
wake
systems
by
interaction
with
social
media
may
exacerbate
these
effects.
The
links
between
the
use
of
social
media
and
sleep
patterns
have
not
been
fully
explored.
Our
study
aimed
to
evaluate
the
effects
of
social
media
on
teenagers’
sleep
and
the
impact
of
sleep
deprivation.
Auteur
correspondant.
Adresse
e-mail
:
dr.royant-parola@reseau-morphee.fr
(S.
Royant-Parola).
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.encep.2017.03.009
0013-7006/©
2017
L’Enc´
ephale,
Paris.
322
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
Methodology.
As
part
of
a
sleep
education
program
conducted
in
middle
schools,
teenagers
from
6th
to
9th
grade
were
invited
to
complete
an
online
questionnaire
on
sleep
habits
with
teacher
supervision
and
after
parental
consent.
Outcome
measures
were
sleep
and
wake
times
with
estimated
sleep
duration
in
school
(SP)
and
rest
periods
(RP),
use
of
screens
(computers,
tablets,
smartphones
and
video
game
consoles),
the
use
of
social
media
and
impact
on
visual
analogue
scales
of
sleep
quality,
mood
and
daytime
functioning.
Students
were
divided
into
those
with
clear
sleep
deprivation
(sleep
time
<
6
hours
in
SP)
and
those
whose
sleep
time
was
in
line
with
the
National
Sleep
Foundations
recommended
sleep
needs
for
teenagers
(9
hours
or
more).
Results.
A
total
of
786
questionnaires
were
completed
and
776
were
exploitable.
Four
schools
took
part
with
408/786
girls
(64.2
%)
and
a
mean
age
of
12.4
±
1.24.
Internet
access
was
almost
universal
(98.3
%),
85.2
%
had
cell
phones
and
42.7
%
had
a
personal
computer
in
their
bedroom.
Social
media
was
used
by
64.6
%.
After
dinner,
52.6
%
spent
more
than
an
hour
and
14.7
%
spent
more
than
2
hours
in
front
of
a
screen.
After
bedtime,
51.7
%
regularly
used
electronic
devices
of
which
25.6
%
had
a
screen-based
activity
(e.g.
texts,
social
media,
video
games
or
television).
During
the
night,
some
teens
woke
up
to
continue
screen-
based
activities:
6.1
%
in
order
to
play
online
video
games,
15.3
%
to
send
texts
and
11
%
to
use
social
media.
Bedtimes
were
later
in
PR
compared
with
PS
(22h06
±
132
vs.
23h54
±
02;
P
<
0.0001)
as
were
wake
times
(7h06
±
36
vs.
10h06
±
102;
P
<
0.0001).
Sleep
time
was
clearly
longer
in
PR
(10h12
±
126
P
<
0.0001)
com-
pared
to
PS.
For
students
in
6th
grade
compared
to
9th
grade
in
sleep
duration
in
SP
decreased
(8:55
±
90
vs.
7:25
±
93;
P
<
0.0001),
whereas
sleep
duration
during
RP
was
stable
(10h08
±
118
vs.
10h08
±
90
P
<
0.029).
No
significant
difference
was
found
between
girls
and
boys
for
sleep
duration,
sleep
quality,
performance
during
the
day
or
mood.
Sleep
deprivation
during
the
week
(6
hours
or
less)
was
less
common
in
6th
graders
5
%
vs.
15
%
(P
<
0.0001).
In
sleep
deprived
teens
compared
to
teens
sleeping,
the
recommended
9
hours,
difficulties
falling
asleep
were
reported
with
33
%
vs.
9
%
taking
over
an
hour
to
fall
asleep
(P
<
0.0001)
and
difficulties
getting
up
in
the
morning
were
more
common
(7.05
±
3.27
vs.
5.74
±
2.97;
P
=
0.0003).
Sleep
deprivation
had
an
effect
on
daytime
performance:
teenagers
deprived
of
sleep
were
more
likely
to
report
a
need
to
fight
sleepiness,
(5.93
±
3.24
vs.
2.84
±
2.44
P
<
0.0001)
and
had
reduced
energy
during
the
day
(6.21
±
2.86
vs.
7.77
±
2.07
P
<
0.0001).
A
negative
effect
on
mood
was
evident:
in
sleep,
deprived
teenagers
irritability
(5.28
±
3.12
vs.
3.30
±
2.34;
P
<
0.0001)
and
feelings
of
sadness
(3.97
±
2.99
vs.
2.59
±
2.15;
P
=
0.003)
were
more
common.
There
was
a
clear
association
between
sleep
deprivation
and
access
to
screens
and
social
media:
sleep
deprived
teens
were
at
more
risk
of
nocturnal
disruption
with
a
higher
prevalence
of
computers
(67
%
vs.
33
%;
P
<
0.0001),
cell
phones
(99
%
vs.
80
%;
P
=
0.0001)
and
smart
phones
(85
%
vs.
66
%;
P
=
0.0001)
in
their
bedrooms.
Conclusions.
Access
to
social
media
and
especially
a
cell
phone
in
teenagers’
bedrooms
is
associated
with
a
reduction
in
sleep
time
during
the
school
week
with
negative
effects
on
daily
functioning
and
mood
which
increases
with
increasing
age.
Education
about
use
of
social
media
and
sleep
for
teenagers
needs
to
start
early
as
modifications
in
sleep
and
evening
use
of
screens
was
present
on
our
population
from
11
years
on
and
to
involve
parents
as
setting
parent
controlled
bedtimes
has
been
shown
to
increase
teenage
sleep
time.
©
2017
L’Enc´
ephale,
Paris.
1.
Introduction
La
durée
du
sommeil
de
l’adolescent
se
réduit.
Il
est
passé
de
9
heures
54
minutes
en
1975
à
7
heures
48
minutes
en
1985
[1].
Le
temps
de
sommeil
la
veille
des
jours
d’école
baisse
drastique-
ment
entre
11
et
15
ans
(9h26
et
7h55),
alors
que
le
temps
de
sommeil,
la
veille
des
jours
de
repos
reste
assez
stable,
aux
alen-
tours
de
10
heures
[2].
Cette
diminution
est
notée
dans
différents
pays
[3,4]
avec
un
temps
de
sommeil,
les
jours
de
semaine
géné-
ralement
au-dessous
de
8
heures
[5].
Un
environnement
familial
et
social
peu
encadrant
ou
défavorisé
[6]
augmente
le
risque
de
mauvais
sommeil
et
de
sommeil
insuffisant.
Le
rôle
néfaste
d’Internet
et
des
médias
électroniques
est
souligné
[7–11]
avec
une
corrélation
négative
forte
entre
le
temps
passé
et
le
temps
de
sommeil
[12].
La
dégradation
de
la
qualité
du
sommeil
par
l’usage
des
médias
sociaux
serait
asso-
ciée
à
plus
d’anxiété,
de
dépression
et
de
mauvaise
estime
de
soi
[13].
Les
téléphones
sont
également
bien
identifiés
comme
facteurs
perturbant
le
sommeil
[14–16]
avec
une
utilisation
fré-
quente
après
l’extinction
des
lumières
[4]
associée
à
une
fatigue
diurne
[17].
La
privation
de
sommeil,
surtout
chez
le
jeune,
a
des
consé-
quences
connues,
notamment
de
somnolence
et
de
difficultés
d’attention
mais
aussi
de
risque
d’obésité
[18,19]
et
de
dépression
[20].
En
France,
les
études
actuelles
confirment
cette
privation
mais
les
comportements
associés
restent
à
définir.
Notre
enquête
a
pour
objet
de
préciser
le
comportement
des
adolescents
au
moment
du
coucher
et
pendant
la
nuit.
2.
Méthodologie
Quatre
collèges
répartis
sur
la
région
parisienne
ont
participé
à
une
enquête
sur
le
sommeil,
à
l’occasion
d’actions
de
sensibilisa-
tion
réalisées
dans
les
classes.
Les
élèves
ont
été
sollicités
en
classe
de
travaux
pratiques
pour
remplir
un
questionnaire
anonyme
en
ligne.
Le
questionnaire
a
été
soumis
à
l’accord
du
Comité
pédago-
gique
et
du
comité
d’éducation
à
la
santé
et
la
citoyenneté
(CESC)
de
chacun
des
établissements.
La
base
des
données
recueillies
a
fait
l’objet
d’une
déclaration
à
la
CNIL.
Seuls
les
collégiens
volon-
taires
et
dont
les
parents
ont
donné
leur
accord
écrit
au
comité
d’établissement
ont
participé
à
l’enquête.
Les
classes
se
répartis-
saient
en
6e(46,9
%),
5e(11,3
%),
4e(31,3
%)
et
3e(10,4
%).
Le
questionnaire
en
ligne
ne
comportait
aucun
identifiant
en
dehors
de
l’âge
(exprimé
en
années),
le
sexe
et
l’établissement
scolaire.
Les
items
concernaient
les
heures
de
coucher
et
de
lever
en
période
sco-
laire
(PS)
et
en
période
de
repos
wee-kend/vacances
(PR),
la
durée
estimée
du
sommeil,
l’utilisation
des
écrans
(ordinateurs,
tablettes,
smartphone,
consoles.
.
.)
et
des
réseaux
sociaux
et
l’impact
(par
échelle
visuo-analogique)
sur
la
qualité
du
sommeil,
l’humeur
et
le
fonctionnement
diurne.
Des
questions
sur
le
comportement
de
l’adolescent
avant
le
coucher,
à
la
mise
au
lit
et
pendant
la
nuit
ont
été
recueillies.
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
323
Sept
cent
quatre-vingt-six
questionnaires
ont
été
remplis.
Sept
cent
soixante-seize
ont
été
exploitables.
Nous
avons
étudié
les
comportements
des
différentes
popula-
tions,
selon
l’âge,
le
sexe
et
la
classe
d’origine.
Nous
nous
sommes
intéressés
à
ceux
dont
le
temps
du
sommeil
estimé
en
semaine
est
suffisant,
selon
les
recommandations
de
la
National
Sleep
Founda-
tion
[21]
(
9
heures)
en
comparaison
à
ceux
dont
le
sommeil
est
notablement
insuffisant
(6
heures).
L’analyse
statistique
a
été
réalisée
sur
XLSTAT.
Les
données
manquantes
ont
été
exclues
de
l’analyse.
Pour
l’ensemble
de
la
population,
les
analyses
utilisées
on
fait
appel
à
des
tests
ou
des
corrélations
de
Spearman.
Les
comparaisons
des
sous-groupes
ont
été
réalisées
par
chi2et
tests
non
paramétriques
(Mann-Whitney
et
Kruskall-Wallis)
pour
les
données
d’intervalle
et
non
normalement
distribuées.
3.
Résultats
3.1.
Les
nouveaux
comportements
du
soir
et
de
la
nuit
Sur
les
776
collégiens
ayant
répondu
à
l’enquête
en
2013–2014,
on
compte
408
filles
et
368
garc¸
ons,
âgés
en
moyenne
de
12,4
ans
±
1,2.
L’équipement
familial
et
personnel
sur
le
plan
des
technologies
connectées
est
important
:
98,3
%
des
adolescents
ont
une
connexion
Internet
à
la
maison,
42,7
%
disposent
d’un
ordina-
teur
dans
la
chambre,
26,4
%
ont
une
télévision
personnelle
dans
la
chambre
et
85,2
%
ont
un
téléphone
portable
personnel.
Il
s’agit
d’un
smartphone
pour
66,7
%
des
collégiens,
c’est-à-dire
qu’ils
disposent
d’une
connexion
Internet
associée
leur
permettant
de
se
connecter,
notamment
à
des
réseaux
sociaux.
Les
réseaux
sociaux
sont
utilisés
par
64,6
%
des
collégiens,
31,7
%
sont
sur
Facebook,
11,1
%
sur
Google+,
7,5
%
sur
Instagram
et
14,3
%
sur
d’autres
réseaux.
Le
temps
passé
sur
une
console,
une
tablette
ou
un
ordinateur
après
le
dîner
est
de
plus
d’une
heure
pour
52,6
%
des
collégiens,
dont
14,7
%
qui
y
passent
plus
de
2
heures.
Une
fois
au
lit,
51,7
%
utilisent
régulièrement
un
appareil
électronique
(33,1
%
un
téléphone,
10,4
%
une
tablette
ou
un
ordinateur,
7,3
%
un
lecteur
Mp3,
6
%
une
console).
Les
activités,
une
fois
couchés,
sont
la
lecture
(24,5
%),
écouter
de
la
musique
ou
la
radio
(14,3
%),
activité
sur
écran
:
SMS,
réseaux
sociaux,
vidéos,
télé
(26,6
%).
Le
jeu
sur
téléphone
ou
console
ne
touche
que
0,9
%
des
collégiens.
À
noter
que,
32,6
%
d’entre
eux
essayent
tout
simplement
de
dormir.
Après
une
première
période
de
sommeil
et
en
cours
de
nuit,
les
adolescents
décrivent
des
activités
de
jeux
ou
connectées
:
6,1
%
se
réveillent
pour
jouer
sur
Internet,
15,3
%
envoient
des
SMS
et
11
%
se
connectent
sur
les
réseaux
sociaux.
On
constate
que
22,1
%
de
ceux
qui
ont
ces
comportements
y
passent
plus
d’une
heure
en
cours
de
nuit
(dont
10,3
%
plus
de
2
h).
Pour
73,9
%
d’entre
eux,
cet
éveil
n’est
ni
volontaire
ni
provoqué
et
leur
activité
connectée
la
nuit
se
fait
à
l’occasion
d’un
éveil
«
pour
passer
le
temps
»
mais
pour
26,1
%,
ces
activités
sont
organisées
dès
le
coucher,
avec
15,5
%
qui
attendent
que
tout
le
monde
soit
endormi
pour
jouer
ou
discu-
ter,
alors
que
10,6
%
programment
un
réveil
volontaire
en
cours
de
nuit.
3.2.
Les
habitudes
horaires
Les
collégiens
déclarent
dormir
en
moyenne
8h30
±
102
min
les
veilles
de
cours
et
10h12
±
126
min
les
veilles
de
jours
de
repos
ou
en
vacances
(p
<
0,0001)
;
en
période
scolaire,
9,3
%
dorment
6
h
ou
moins
et
21,5
%
dorment
7
h
ou
moins.
Les
horaires
de
coucher
les
jours
d’école
sont
en
moyenne
de
22h06
±
132
min
et
de
23h54
±
102
min
les
jours
de
repos
(p
<
0,0001).
Les
horaires
de
lever,
les
jours
d’école
se
situent
à
7h06
±
36
min
et
à
10h06
±
102
min
les
jours
de
repos
(p
<
0,0001).
Les
horaires
de
coucher
sont
très
liés
à
l’âge
pour
les
2
périodes
(r
PS
=
0,464
et
r
PR
=
0,300
;
p
<
0,0001),
le
lien
existe
aussi
pour
les
horaires
de
lever
mais
il
est
plus
faible
(r
PS
=
0,076,
p
=
0,03
et
r
PR
=
0,193,
p
<
0,0001).
Les
horaires
de
coucher
entre
les
2
périodes
sont
fortement
liés
(r
=
0634,
p
<
0,0001).
En
période
scolaire
il
y
a
peu
de
collégiens
qui
se
couchent
après
minuit
(6,9
%),
en
revanche,
en
période
de
repos,
ils
sont
39,7
%.
Pour
les
horaires
de
lever,
la
presque
totalité
des
élèves
est
debout
à
8
h
au
plus
tard,
école
oblige,
alors
qu’en
période
de
repos
les
horaires
de
lever
varient
de
6
h,
au
plus
tôt,
à
plus
de
14
h
avec
25,4
%
des
collégiens
qui
se
lèvent
après
11
h
(Fig.
1).
On
note
des
conséquences
le
lendemain
avec
12
%
des
collégiens
qui
rapportent
un
sommeil
non
reposant
(EVA
<
5),
58
%
qui
ont
du
mal
à
se
lever
le
matin
(EVA
>
5)
avec
30
%
pour
lesquels
se
lever
est
extrêmement
difficile
(EVA
9),
10
%
ne
se
sentent
pas
en
forme
et
énergiques
dans
la
journée
(EVA
>
5),
23
%
se
sentent
irritables
le
lendemain
(EVA
>
5),
23
%
luttent
contre
l’envie
de
dormir
ou
s’endorment
en
classe
(EVA
>
5).
On
constate
27,3
%
des
collégiens
ont
besoin
de
dormir
plus
de
2
heures
lors
des
jours
de
repos.
Ce
sont
les
élèves
les
plus
âgés
pour
lesquels
ce
besoin
est
plus
important
(r
=
0,220
;
p
<
0,0001).
Ils
se
couchent
plus
tard
et
se
lèvent
plus
tard
en
période
de
repos
(r
=
0,236
et
r
=
0,467
respectivement
;
p
<
0,0001)
mais
ce
sont
aussi
eux
qui
se
couchent
plus
tard
en
période
scolaire
(R
=
0,350
;
p
<
0,0001).
Les
horaires
varient
selon
les
classes
(Tableau
1)
mais
on
observe
que,
quel
que
soit
le
niveau,
tous
les
élèves
sont
couchés
plus
tôt
en
période
scolaire,
par
rapport
aux
périodes
de
repos
(p
<
0,0001),
avec
une
heure
de
coucher
plus
tardive
chez
les
élèves
de
3epar
rapport
aux
élèves
de
6e,
en
période
scolaire
(21h34
±
55
min
vs
22h43
±
60
min
;
p
<
0,0001)
et
en
période
de
repos
(23h25
±
84
min
vs
00h11
±
84
min
;
p
=
0,013).
Les
heures
de
lever
en
période
scolaire
et
en
période
de
repos
présentent
moins
de
variations
inter-classe,
avec
une
durée
de
sommeil
en
période
scolaire
plus
courte
en
3e,
par
rapport
aux
élèves
de
6e(8h55
±
90
min
vs
7h25
±
93
min
;
p
<
0,0001).
En
période
scolaire,
une
durée
de
som-
meil
de
9
heures
ou
plus
est
observée
chez
67
%
des
6emais
elle
n’est
que
de
22
%
chez
les
3e.
Parallèlement,
dormir
6
heures
par
nuit
ou
moins
en
période
scolaire
ne
touche
que
5
%
des
6emais
s’élève
à
15
%
chez
les
3e.
3.3.
Effet
du
sexe
Aucune
différence
significative
n’est
retrouvée
entre
les
filles
et
les
garc¸
ons
pour
la
durée
de
sommeil
en
période
scolaire
et
en
période
de
repos
ni
pour
les
échelles
visuo-analogiques
de
qualité
du
sommeil,
de
performance
ou
pour
l’humeur
(Tableau
2).
L’analyse
des
durées
de
sommeil
en
période
scolaire
et
en
période
de
repos
montre
que,
quelle
que
soit
la
classe,
les
collégiens
filles
ou
garc¸
ons
dorment
plus
longtemps
en
période
de
repos
mais
seule
les
filles
ont
une
durée
de
sommeil
qui
décroît
en
période
scolaire
avec
la
perte
d’une
heure
du
sommeil
entre
le
6eet
3e
(8h36
±
84
min
vs
7h36
±
58
min
;
p
=
0,013).
3.4.
Causes
et
conséquences
de
la
privation
du
sommeil
Certains
éléments
comportementaux
sont
plus
souvent
asso-
ciés
à
une
privation
du
sommeil.
Si
l’on
compare
ceux
qui
dorment
peu
(6
heures
ou
moins)
à
ceux
qui
dorment
9
heures
ou
plus
(Tableau
3),
la
présence
d’un
ordinateur
dans
la
chambre
est
retrou-
vée
chez
67
%
des
premiers,
pour
33
%
des
seconds
(p
<
0,0001).
Le
temps
passé
sur
un
ordinateur
ou
une
tablette
le
soir
est
plus
important
chez
les
élèves
qui
dorment
6
heures
ou
moins,
ainsi
avoir
ce
type
d’activité
plus
d’une
heure
le
soir
est
plus
fré-
quent
chez
67
%
d’entre
eux
vs
19
%
(p
<
0,0001).
Ce
sont
eux
qui
sont
plus
connectés
la
nuit
(Fig.
2).
La
présence
d’un
télé-
phone
portable
est
également
plus
fréquente
chez
les
privés
de
324
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
Fig.
1.
Distribution
des
horaires
de
coucher
et
de
lever
selon
les
jours
de
cours
ou
de
repos.
Tableau
1
Heures
de
coucher
et
de
lever
en
fonction
du
niveau
de
la
classe.
Heure
moyenne
de
coucher
(SD)
Heure
moyenne
de
lever
(SD)
Durée
de
sommeil
estimé
moyenne
(SD)
Durée
de
sommeil
Niveau
de
classe
n
PS
PR
PS
PR
PS
PR
6
heures
6e364
21h34
(±55)
23h25
(±84)a07h03
(±31)
09h43
(±95)a8h55
(±90)
10h08
(±118)a19
(5
%)
5e88
22h05
(±78)
00h19
(±116)a07h11
(±32)
10h51
(±100)a8h38
(±98)
10h19
(±173)a10
(11
%)
4e243
22h33
(±74)
00h25
(±97)a07h12
(±41)
10h36(±100)a8h03
(±98)
10h18
(±122)a31
(13
%)
3e81
22h43(±60)
00h11
(±84)a07h01
(±30)
09h58
(±86)a7h25
(±93)
10h08
(±90)a12
(15
%)
Significativité
<0,0001b0,013b<0,0001b<0,0001b<0,0001b0,0029b0,003c
PS
=
période
scolaire
;
PR
=
période
de
repos
(vacances
ou
week-end).
aAnalyse
Mann-Whitney
pour
différence
entre
les
horaires
p
<
0,0001.
bAnalyse
Kruskall-Wallis
pour
différence
entre
les
classes.
cTest
chi2.
sommeil
:
99
%
vs
80
%
(p
=
0,0001)
avec
plus
de
smartphones
85
%
vs
66
%
(p
=
0,0001).
La
présence
d’une
télévision
dans
la
chambre
est
également
plus
fréquente
chez
les
élèves
privés
de
sommeil,
43
%
vs
23
%
(p
=
0,0003).
La
présence
d’une
connexion
d’Internet
en
soi
n’est
pas
associée
à
une
privation
du
som-
meil.
En
période
scolaire,
un
délai
d’endormissement
conséquent
(supérieur
à
une
heure)
est
plus
fréquemment
constaté
chez
les
élèves
privés
du
sommeil
par
rapport
à
ceux
qui
dorment
9
heures
ou
plus
:
33
%
vs
9
%.
Dormir
6
heures
ou
moins
s’accompagne
d’un
sommeil
moins
reposant,
de
plus
des
difficultés
à
se
lever
le
matin,
d’une
moindre
forme
et
de
moins
d’énergie
la
journée,
ils
ont
plus
de
besoin
de
lutter
contre
la
somnolence
et
ont
des
scores
plus
élevés
d’irritabilité
et
de
tristesse
(Tableau
4).
En
ce
qui
concerne
la
forme
et
l’envie
de
dormir
de
la
journée,
il
y
a
un
lien
avec
l’âge
(r
=
-0,243
et
r
=
0,281,
respectivement
;
p
<
0,0001),
plus
les
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
325
Tableau
2
Effet
du
sexe.
Fille
Garc¸
on
Total
Significativitéa
Âge
12,4
(±1,3)
12,5
(±1,2)
12,4
(±1,2)
NS
Durée
du
sommeil
Durée
PS
(SD
en
minutes)
08h24
(±90)
08h36
(±108)
08h30
(±102)
NS
Durée
PR
(SD
en
minutes) 10h12
(±120) 10h06
(±132) 10h12
(±126) NS
Qualité
du
sommeil
(EVA)
Sommeil
reposant
:
moyenne
(SD)b7,2
(±2,1)
7,1
(±2,4)
7,2
(±2,2)
NS
Mal
à
se
lever
:
moyenne
(SD)c6,2
(±3)
6
(±3,1)
6,1
(±3)
NS
Performance
(EVA)
Forme
et
énergie
la
journée
:
moyenne
(SD)d7,3
(±2,2)
7,5
(±2,3)
7,4
(±2,2)
NS
Lutte
contre
la
somnolence
:
moyenne
(SD)e3,5
(±2,7) 3,7
(±2,9) 3,6
(±2,2) NS
Humeur
(EVA)
Irritabilité
:
moyenne
(SD)f3,7
(±2,5)
3,7
(±2,6)
3,7
(±2,6)
NS
Tristesse
:
moyenne
(SD)g2,9
(2,2)
2,8
(2,8)
2,9
(2,3)
NS
aAnalyse
de
Mann-Whitney.
bCotation
des
EVA
:
1
pas
du
tout,
10
très
reposant.
cCotation
des
EVA
:
1
pas
du
tout,
10
très
difficile.
dCotation
des
EVA
:
1
mauvaise,
10
excellente
forme.
eCotation
des
EVA
:
1
pas
du
tout
besoin
de
lutter,
10
je
dois
lutter
beaucoup.
fCotation
des
EVA
:
1
pas
du
tout,
10
très
irritable.
gCotation
des
EVA
:
1
pas
du
tout,
10
très
triste.
Tableau
3
Éléments
perturbateurs
du
sommeil
en
fonction
de
la
privation
de
sommeil.
Temps
estimé
du
sommeil
en
PS
Test
chi2
6
heures
9
heures
p*
Ordinateur
Non
24
(33
%) 264
(67
%) <0,0001
Oui
48
(67
%)
132
(33
%)
Temps
passé
sur
ordinateur/tablette
le
soir
0–30
minutes
8
(11
%)
245
(62
%)
<0,0001
31–60
minutes
16
(22
%)
74
(19
%)
>1
heure
48
(67
%)
77
(19
%)
Téléphone
portable
Non
1
(1
%)
80
(20
%)
0,0001
Oui
71
(99
%)
316
(80
%)
Si
oui,
smartphone
60
(85
%)
210
(66
%)
0,0001
Connexion
Internet
Non
1
(1
%) 8
(2
%) NS
Oui
71
(99
%)
388
(98
%)
Télévision
dans
la
chambre
Non
41
(57
%)
306
(77
%)
0,0003
Oui
31
(43
%)
90
(23
%)
Fig.
2.
Pourcentage
d’activités
connectées
au
cours
d’un
réveil
nocturne
programmé
ou
spontané
dans
l’effectif
total
des
collégiens
et
répartition
selon
la
présence
ou
non
d’une
privation
de
sommeil.
Tableau
4
Effets
de
la
privation
de
sommeil.
6
heures
n
=
72
9
heures
n
=
396
Significativité
Délais
d’endormissement
Moins
de
30
min
26
(36
%)
204
(52
%)
<0,0001a
Entre
30
min
et
1
h
22
(31
%)
158
(40
%)
>1
heure 24
(33
%) 34
(9
%)
Qualité
du
sommeil
(EVA)
Sommeil
reposant
5,49
±
2,92
7,65
±
2012
<0,0001b
Difficultés
à
se
lever
le
matin
7,05
±
3,27
5,74
±
2,97
0,0003b
Performance
(EVA)
Forme
et
énergie
la
journée
6,21
±
2,86
7,77
±
2,07
<0,0001b
Lutter
contre
la
somnolence
5,93
±
3,24
2,84
±
2,44
<
0,0001b
Humeur
(EVA)
Irritabilité
5,28
±
3,12
3,30
±
2,34
<0,0001b
Tristesse
3,97
±
2,99
2,59
±
2,15
0,003b
aTest
de
Chi.
bTest
de
Mann-Whitney.
collégiens
sont
âgés
moins
ils
sont
en
forme
et
énergiques
et
plus
ils
sont
somnolents.
4.
Discussion
4.1.
Des
comportements
perturbés
Sur
le
plan
des
comportements
de
la
soirée
et
au
moment
du
coucher,
nos
résultats
confirment
que
les
habitudes
familiales
dans
la
soirée
sont
en
train
de
changer
avec
globalement
des
activités
qui
rognent
de
plus
en
plus
sur
le
sommeil.
En
ce
qui
concerne
le
sommeil
et
ses
habitudes,
il
est
difficile
de
faire
une
comparai-
son,
des
différentes
études
publiées
entre
elles
car
les
évolutions
technologiques
vont
très
vite.
Des
années
1960
à
1980,
c’est
la
télévision
qui
a
été
incriminée
comme
le
grand
perturbateur
du
sommeil
des
enfants
et
des
adolescents
[22–23],
puis
ce
sont
les
consoles
de
jeux
et
les
ordinateurs
qui
ont
envahi
la
chambre
326
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
dans
les
années
1990
et
jusqu’aux
années
2000.
La
télévision
peut
induire
un
coucher
plus
tardif,
en
revanche,
elle
n’est
pas
néces-
sairement
associée
à
un
retard
de
l’endormissement,
comme
ce
que
l’on
peut
observer
avec
un
ordinateur
[14,24].
La
grande
révo-
lution
de
ces
dernières
années
est
l’apparition
du
smartphone
en
2011,
la
proportion
des
12–17
ans
disposant
d’un
téléphone
mobile
est
passée
de
72
%
en
2005
à
90
%
en
2013
avec
une
progression
très
rapide
des
smartphones
(45
%
en
2012,
55
%
en
2013).
Dans
notre
étude,
85,2
%
des
collégiens
avaient
un
téléphone
et
66,7
%
un
smartphone
mais
ces
chiffres
grimpent
(respectivement
à
99
%
et
85
%)
chez
ceux
qui
dorment
insuffisamment.
Le
fait
d’avoir
une
connexion
Internet
dans
le
foyer
n’est
pas
un
facteur
discri-
minant,
car
c’est
quasi
la
règle
de
toutes
les
familles
(98,3
%
avaient
une
connexion
Internet).
Les
occupations
connectées
sur
un
écran
(ordinateur,
tablette,
smartphone)
avant
le
coucher,
qui
concernent
52,6
%
des
jeunes
pendant
plus
d’une
heure,
comme
l’utilisation
de
ces
appareils
au
moment
du
coucher
(26,6
%)
semblent
mal-
heureusement
être
des
comportements
de
plus
en
fréquents
et
tolérés
par
les
parents.
Ce
qui
est
plus
étonnant
est
leur
utilisa-
tion
en
cours
de
nuit
:
6,1
%
se
réveillent
pour
jouer
sur
Internet,
15,3
%
envoient
des
SMS
et
11
%
se
connectent
sur
les
réseaux
sociaux.
Les
études
antérieures
[9–14,17]
ont
bien
documenté
l’activité
sur
Internet
ou
sur
les
téléphones
portables
dans
la
soirée
et
au
cou-
cher.
L’adolescent
est
souvent
connecté
en
multitâche
:
musique,
vidéo,
recherche
sur
Internet,
réseaux
sociaux
avec
la
possibilité
de
rentrer
dans
une
discussion
intime
et
sans
fin
avec
un
ami.
Une
étude
a
montré
que
l’utilisation
des
discussions
(chat,
SMS.
.
.)
sur
Internet
est
peut-être
plus
fréquente
en
vacances
[25]
mais
nous
n’avons
pas
dans
notre
étude,
des
précisions
sur
le
moment
surviennent
de
tels
comportements.
En
revanche,
il
semble
que
de
longues
interruptions
du
sommeil
en
cours
de
nuit,
pouvant
durer
parfois
plus
de
2
h
pour
10,3
%
des
collégiens
réveillés
la
nuit
sont
des
comportements
nouveaux.
Des
éveils
de
ce
type
ont
été
décrits
antérieurement
pour
les
jeux
sur
Internet
[26]
mais
jamais
spécifiquement
étudié
en
termes
de
comportement
par
rapport
au
sommeil
[27].
Il
s’agit
ici
d’activités
socialisantes,
d’échanges
ou
de
contacts
avec
l’autre,
ami,
confident,
inconnu,
rencontré
sur
internet.
Le
téléphone
et
plus
particulièrement
le
smartphone
fonctionne
auprès
des
jeunes
d’abord
comme
un
outil
de
socialisation
communiquer
et
rencontrer
mais
également
comme
un
vecteur
de
collaboration,
de
contribution
ou
de
par-
tage
[28].
Cette
incapacité
à
mettre
une
fin
aux
activités
diurnes
peut
être
attribuée
à
un
comportement
addictif
[29],
possible
chez
quelques
adolescents,
mais
ce
qui
est
mis
en
jeu
ici
est
beau-
coup
plus
une
appropriation,
presque
une
incorporation
de
l’outil
«
smartphone
»,
qui
devient
un
prolongement
de
soi
pour
commu-
niquer
avec
l’autre,
comportement
essentiel
et
habituellement
structurant,
qui
concerne
la
majorité
des
adolescents.
Sur
le
plan
physiologique,
l’activité
réalisée
le
soir
sur
ordinateur,
tablette
ou
smartphone
est
en
soi
éveillante
mais
ce
n’est
pas
le
seul
méca-
nisme
[5,10].
L’utilisation
des
écrans
(y
compris
les
smartphones)
en
cours
de
nuit,
sur
de
longues
durées,
expose
le
jeune
à
une
lumière
intense
proche
des
yeux,
dont
le
spectre
lumineux
bleuté
à
380
nm
a
une
action
intense
et
spécifique
sur
la
rétine.
La
lumière
bloque
non
seulement
la
montée
de
la
sécrétion
de
la
mélatonine
[30,31]
introduisant
ainsi
une
désorganisation
de
la
rythmicité
cir-
cadienne
[32,33]
mais
a
aussi
un
effet
éveillant
qui
diminue
l’envie
de
dormir
et
donc,
retarde
le
sommeil
[20,34].
Une
large
étude
sur
9846
adolescents
[35]
a
montré
que
plus
le
temps
passé
sur
écran
était
important,
plus
la
durée
de
sommeil
se
raccourcissait,
aggra-
vant
encore
les
conséquences
du
mauvais
sommeil.
Les
écrans
de
télévision
ne
produisent
pas
le
même
effet
dans
la
mesure
ils
sont
de
taille
moyenne,
situés
à
une
distance
des
yeux
de
2
ou
3
m,
car
la
lumière
émise
est
trop
faible
pour
stimuler
la
rétine
et
avoir
un
effet
sur
les
rythmes
biologiques.
4.2.
Une
privation
de
sommeil
surajoutée
Selon
les
recommandations
internationales
la
durée
de
sommeil
conseillée
pour
les
élèves
de
moins
de
17
ans
est
de
8
à
10
heures
par
nuit,
en
moyenne
les
collégiens
ont
un
temps
de
sommeil
en
accord
avec
cette
durée,
dormant
8h30
en
période
scolaire
mais
l’analyse
plus
fine
des
résultats
montre
que
seuls
67
%
des
6eet
22
%
des
3eont
une
durée
de
sommeil
adéquate
en
période
sco-
laire
avec
un
besoin
de
récupérer
en
période
de
repos
noté
pour
27,3
%
des
élèves
qui
ont
une
privation
de
sommeil
majeure
pour
9,3
%
d’entre
eux
(6
heures
ou
moins).
Cette
privation
de
sommeil
est
une
constante
dans
toutes
les
études
qui
montrent
les
effets
sur
le
sommeil
des
mauvaises
habitudes
le
soir,
avant
et
au
moment
du
coucher
avec
un
effet
majeur
de
l’utilisation
des
nouveaux
médias
[9,10,13,17,19,28,36].
Ce
sont
ceux
qui
se
couchent
le
plus
tard
en
période
scolaire
qui
se
couchent
aussi
le
plus
tard
en
période
de
repos,
ce
qui
veut
dire
qu’il
y
a
à
la
fois
des
sujets
du
soir
et
des
ado-
lescents
qui
ont
régulièrement
des
comportements
inappropriés
le
soir.
Les
jours
de
repos
on
constate
non
seulement
un
allongement
de
la
durée
de
sommeil
mais
aussi
un
décalage
des
horaires
de
som-
meil
avec
un
endormissement
plus
tardif
et
un
lever
plus
tardif
:
cet
effet
est
également
retrouvé
dans
les
autres
études.
Il
est
très
lié
à
l’âge,
avec
un
effet
classe,
plus
marqué
chez
les
3eque
chez
les
6eet
touche
également
les
filles
et
les
garc¸
ons.
Contrairement
à
une
étude
sur
des
données
de
2010
[2]
nous
ne
retrouvons
pas
de
différence
pour
la
durée
de
sommeil
entre
les
filles
et
les
garc¸
ons.
Tout
au
plus
on
note
que
les
filles
perdent
plus
de
sommeil
que
les
garc¸
ons
entre
la
6eet
la
3een
période
scolaire.
4.3.
Des
conséquences
importantes
Dormir
suffisamment
est
une
source
de
bien
être
psychologique
[37].
Les
collégiens
en
manque
de
sommeil
de
notre
population
ont
plus
de
problèmes
d’endormissement,
leur
sommeil
est
moins
reposant,
avec
plus
de
difficultés
à
se
lever
le
matin,
une
moindre
forme
et
moins
d’énergie
la
journée,
plus
de
somnolence
et
plus
d’irritabilité
et
de
tristesse.
Or,
l’on
sait
que
la
présence
de
troubles
du
sommeil
est
liée
à
un
risque
plus
important
de
dépression
et
de
rechutes
[38–39],
par
ailleurs
que
les
difficultés
d’endormissement
et
la
fatigue
le
matin
sont
plus
souvent
liée
à
des
comportements
à
risques
chez
l’adolescent
(boire,
fumer,
actes
délictueux)
[40–41].
Un
lien
a
été
trouvé
entre
l’utilisation
des
médias
sociaux
et
la
dépression
avec
une
privation
et
une
fragmentation
du
sommeil
plus
importante
[42].
Les
conséquences
sur
le
poids
de
la
privation
de
sommeil
mais
aussi
des
rythmes
décalés
[43]
sont
maintenant
bien
connus
et
plus
particulièrement
chez
le
jeune
[44–45].
Plus
le
sommeil
est
court
plus
le
surpoids
est
grand
[46],
on
peut
donc
craindre
des
prises
de
poids,
car
dans
notre
étude,
les
collégiens
les
plus
âgés
ont
les
durées
de
sommeil
les
plus
courtes.
Limitations
de
l’étude
:
ces
résultats
présentent
certaines
faiblesses
méthodologiques
que
l’on
trouve
dans
les
études
obser-
vationnelles.
Les
collèges
n’ont
pas
été
tirés
au
sort
mais
ils
sont
répartis
dans
des
zones
géographiques
très
complémentaires
en
termes
de
milieu
social.
La
participation
des
classes
s’est
faite
selon
le
volontariat
et
la
disponibilité
des
professeurs.
Elle
s’intégrait
dans
le
cadre
d’une
action
globale
de
sensibilisation
au
sommeil
ce
qui
explique
la
bonne
adhésion
des
élèves
et
le
peu
de
question-
naires
non
exploitables.
Le
recueil
des
données
s’est
déroulé
dans
le
milieu
naturel
des
collégiens,
au
sein
de
leurs
classes,
encadrés
par
leur
professeur.
On
sait
qu’il
existe
une
bonne
corrélation
entre
le
déclaratif
des
horaires
de
coucher
et
lever
et
des
outils
objec-
tifs
comme
l’actinométrie
ce
qui
justifie
l’intérêt
d’enquête
pour
de
telle
population
[47–48].
Par
ailleurs,
notre
échantillon
est
impor-
tant
par
rapport
à
la
plupart
des
études
qui
ne
concernent
que,
quelques
centaines
de
jeunes.
Enfin,
le
bassin
parisien
bénéficie
d’une
bonne
couverture
téléphonique
et
d’un
bon
réseau
Internet
S.
Royant-Parola
et
al.
/
L’Encéphale
44
(2018)
321–328
327
qui
recoupe
sensiblement
celui
retrouvé
dans
le
rapport
du
CREDOC
de
2013
[49].
5.
Conclusion
L’étude
confirme
que
les
jeunes
adolescents
ont
des
comporte-
ments
vis-à-vis
de
leur
sommeil
qui
montrent
une
méconnaissance
de
leur
besoin
et
des
comportements
inappropriés,
non
seulement
dans
la
soirée
et
au
coucher
mais
aussi
en
cours
de
nuit.
Cela
contri-
bue
à
réduire
et
à
fractionner
leur
sommeil
avec
des
conséquences
prévisibles
sur
leur
santé
qui
sont
préoccupantes
en
termes
de
santé
publique,
alors
que,
l’on
sait
qu’une
approche
éducative
et
encadrante
en
milieu
scolaire
et
par
les
parents
pourrait
en
réduire
l’intensité.
Des
études
ont
en
effet
évalué
l’impact
de
l’encadrement
familial
avec
la
mise
en
place
d’un
horaire
de
coucher
déterminé.
Une
majorité
de
jeunes
limitent
alors
les
couchers
tardifs
et
aug-
mentent
leur
temps
de
sommeil
[8,50].
Le
simple
fait
de
parler
du
sommeil
et
de
mettre
en
place
des
consignes
parentales
a
des
effets
positifs
sur
le
sommeil
[51,52]
et
peut
même
contribuer
à
limi-
ter
l’apparition
d’une
dépression
[53].
Des
programmes
éducatifs
destinés
aux
jeunes
avec
implication
de
leurs
parents
sont
à
prévoir.
Déclaration
de
liens
d’intérêts
Les
auteurs
déclarent
ne
pas
avoir
de
liens
d’intérêts.
Remerciements
Au
conseil
régional
d’île-de-France.
Références
[1]
Strauch
I,
Meier
B.
Sleep
need
in
adolescents:
a
longitudinal
approach.
Sleep
1989;11:378–86.
[2]
Leger
D,
Beck
F,
Richard
J-B,
et
al.
Total
sleep
time
severely
drops
during
ado-
lescence.
PLoS
One
2012;7:e45204.
[3]
Gradisar
M,
Gardner
G,
Dohnt
H.
Recent
worldwide
sleep
patterns
and
pro-
blems
during
adolescence:
a
review
and
meta-analysis
of
age,
region
and
sleep.
Sleep
Med
2011;12:110–8.
[4]
Yang
C-K,
Kim
JK,
Patel
SR,
et
al.
Age-related
changes
in
sleep/wake
patterns
among
Korean
teenagers.
Pediatrics
2005;115:250–6.
[5]
Owens
J,
Adolescent
sleep
working
group,
committee
on
adolescence.
Insuf-
ficient
sleep
in
adolescents
and
young
adults:
an
update
on
causes
and
consequences.
Pediatrics
2014;134:e921–32.
[6]
Gangwisch
JE,
Babiss
LA,
Malaspina
D,
et
al.
Earlier
parental
set
bed-
times
as
a
protective
factor
against
depression
and
suicidal
ideation.
Sleep
2010;33:97–106.
[7]
Hale
L,
Guan
S.
Screen