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A New Class of Adaptive Regulators for Robot Manipulators

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Abstract

This paper addresses the adaptive regulation of rigid robot manipulators. A family of adaptive control laws (control laws and update laws), proposed in this paper, achieves Lyapunov stability and global positioning convergence. The design of this family of controllers is based in the energy shaping plus damping injection approach and exploits interesting features of Cl increasing saturation functions. It is shown that several “artificial potential energies ” functions reported in the literature can lead to this family of adaptive controllers.

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