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Simulation Games as Interventions in the Promotion of Social Skills Development among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Abstract

It has been suggested that game technology can be successfully used to aid in social skills development among those with special needs. Based on the body of research available, such technology has been used in social skills development with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Furthermore, there is research to suggest that certain game technology, such as simulation-based games, can enhance learning and the retention of knowledge which is of important benefit, given children with ASD show great difficulty in generalizing newly learned skills and knowledge from the instructional to the functional setting. However, at the time of this publication, very little empirical evidence exists which has specifically investigated the use of simulation-based games as interventions in the promotion of social skill development among children with ASD.

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