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Social Skills Development for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Through the Use of Interactive Storytelling Games

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Abstract

Storytelling is an intricate part of the human psyche and hence, human history. From childhood, stories play an important role in human development, in that, for instance, humans automatically construct a storyline so that they can associate information. There is research to suggest that storytelling in video games can be beneficial because it can be used to help players identify with characters and their goals, creating a greater sense of immersion, positive feelings, and more physiological arousal. Furthermore, when the content is specific and targeted, these games are well suited for promoting acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of skills and knowledge. Findings such as these hold immense promise in the context of improving social skills for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Thus, the use of computers and video games, combined with more traditional storytelling, may serve as hopeful tools for motivating and engaging students as well as promoting learning. This chapter expounds upon this line of reasoning and explores the use of interactive storytelling games as an effective intervention in social skills development for children with ASD.

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This chapter reveals the overview of digital technologies; the overview of digital storytelling in education; and the overview of digital literacy in education. Digital storytelling and digital literacy are very important in modern education. Digital storytelling is used to improve student's learning through multimedia in the modern classrooms. Digital storytelling is the expressive medium that can explain even the most intricate topics in depth, integrating it with the rest of the curriculum. Digital literacy is the ability to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills. Digital literacy leads to the great increases in information that can be conveniently accessed. The chapter argues that developing digital storytelling and digital literacy skills has the potential to improve both teaching and learning performance in modern education.
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Marked and unmarked language forms can be distinguished with the level of simplicity or complexity denotations of the forms. Unmarked target language forms may create little or no difficulty, even if they do not exist in the native language of the learner, while marked forms can be relatively difficult for language learners. In addition to the notions of markedness/unmarkedness, there has also been an emphasis on similarity and dissimilarity between the items of first (L1) and second languages (L2). Along with similarity or dissimilarity of L1 and L2 forms, the level of difficulty may vary enormously in different language-specific procedures. In this chapter, therefore, it is intended to build an understanding of the recognized pronunciation and orthographic problems of similar loanwords in both Turkish (L1 of the participants) and English (L2).
Chapter
This chapter reveals the overview of digital technologies; the overview of digital storytelling in education; and the overview of digital literacy in education. Digital storytelling and digital literacy are very important in modern education. Digital storytelling is used to improve student's learning through multimedia in the modern classrooms. Digital storytelling is the expressive medium that can explain even the most intricate topics in depth, integrating it with the rest of the curriculum. Digital literacy is the ability to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills. Digital literacy leads to the great increases in information that can be conveniently accessed. The chapter argues that developing digital storytelling and digital literacy skills has the potential to improve both teaching and learning performance in modern education.
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