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Nordic-Baltic Campaign Against Trafficking in Women: Final report 2002

Authors:
  • Institute for Feminism & Human Rights

Abstract

The report was finalized in November 2003, and published in 2004 by the Nordic Council of Ministers, Copenhagen, Denmark. Also available at: http://norden.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A701073&dswid=2710
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... It also requires the involvement and collaboration of a broad variety of public and private actors. In Sweden, this work is undertaken not only by the Swedish government and public authorities but also by the women's movement, the shelter movement, and other nongovernmental organizations (NGO's) (Ekberg, 2003). ...
... The campaign was financed and carried out under the auspices of the Nordic Council of Ministers. For more information about the Swedish Campaign, see Ekberg (2003). 37 Under the South Korean law that criminalizes the buyers of sexual services, a person can be sentenced to pay fines up to 3 million won (approximately US$ 3000) or at the most one year in prison. ...
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Article
After several years of public debate initiated by the Swedish women’s movement, the Law That Prohibits the Purchase of Sexual Services came into force on January 1, 1999. The Law is the first attempt by a country to address the root cause of prostitution and trafficking in beings: the demand, the men who assume the right to purchase persons for prostitution purposes. This ground breaking law is a cornerstone of Swedish efforts to create a contemporary, democratic society where women and girls can live lives free of all forms of male violence. In combination with public education, awareness-raising campaigns, and victim support, the Law and other legislation establish a zero tolerance policy for prostitution and trafficking in human beings. When the buyers risk punishment, the number of men who buy prostituted persons decreases, and the local prostitution markets become less lucrative. Traffickers will then choose other and more profitable destinations.
... In Christie's words: 'By "ideal victim" I have (…) in mind a person or a category of individuals who-when hit by crime-most readily are given the complete and legitimate status of being a victim ' (1986, 18). The film was frequently employed in campaigns against trafficking initiated by the Nordic Council of Ministers, and the Council used it extensively in seminars as well as in schools in the Nordic and Baltic countries (Ekberg 2002). Representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGO's) criticising the Norwegian immigration authorities of failing to protect victims of trafficking also made use of it (Austbø and Tjessem 2002). ...
... In Christie's words: 'By "ideal victim" I have (…) in mind a person or a category of individuals who-when hit by crime-most readily are given the complete and legitimate status of being a victim ' (1986, 18). The film was frequently employed in campaigns against trafficking initiated by the Nordic Council of Ministers, and the Council used it extensively in seminars as well as in schools in the Nordic and Baltic countries (Ekberg 2002). Representatives of non-governmental organisations (NGO's) criticising the Norwegian immigration authorities of failing to protect victims of trafficking also made use of it (Austbø and Tjessem 2002). ...
Chapter
The introduction to this volume presents the key questions around gender-based violence in migration contexts to which the eight chapters of the volume seek to provide empirical and theoretical answers. The introduction equally clarifies the conceptual underpinnings and scholarly anchorage of the volume by defining the notion of gender-based violence and reviewing existing literature on the various forms of GBV occurrences in the context of migration. The introduction then sketches out the theoretical framework of the volume. For this purpose, it presents the main tenets of a feminist intersectional approach to GBV in migration settings and examines the relevance of the notions of precarity, precariousness and vulnerability from this perspective. Finally, the introduction lays out the structure of the book and foregrounds the main contributions of each chapter.KeywordsGBV literature reviewMigrationFeminismIntersectionalityPrecarityVulnerability
... The Working Group agreed to use the United Nations Protocol 125 and its definition of trafficking in human beings as a point of reference for the Campaign, as well as for the national campaigns, and agreed to address the demand that encourages the trafficking in women for sexual exploitation by using Article 9.5 of the Protocol as an important guideline for the activities during the Campaign. 126 Thematic days for high school students on prostitution, human trafficking and gender equality The film, Lilya 4-ever, produced in 2002 by the Swedish film director, Lukas Moodysson, 127 was extensively used for the purpose of public awareness raising about prostitution and trafficking in human beings at more than 100 events organized by the Swedish Government jointly with the Swedish Institute for educational purposes in a large number of countries during 2003-2004. ...
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Technical Report
New and expanded overview of the Swedish approach to the prevention and elimination of prostitution and trafficking in human beings. Updated February 24, 2018.
Chapter
In this chapter we explore the paradox that despite being defined as a vulnerable group in need of special protection, trafficking victims have been found to have difficulty obtaining protection in Norway. Using a vulnerability analysis, highlighting the role of institutions in both producing and redressing harm, the authors analyse the case of a trafficking victim with a long trajectory in the Norwegian legal system as well as in the media. We conclude that the state response to this case reveals the inherent structural violence at the intersection of international and national criminal-, migration-, and human rights laws and regulations, and policies aimed at limiting immigration, thereby evading Human Rights obligations, as well as contributing to the brutalisation of contemporary international migration regimes.
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Article
Research, programs, and legislation related to sex trafficking are often premised on the invisibility of the male buyer and the failure to address men’s role in buying and abusing women in prostitution. Governments, UN agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and others act as if the male demand for sexual exploitation is insignificant, or that prostitution is so entrenched because, after all, “men will be men.” Little research on trafficking has focused on the so-called customer as a root cause of trafficking and sexual exploitation. And even less legislation has penalized the male customer whose right to buy women and children for prostitution activities remains unquestioned. This article looks at the demand—its meaning, the myths that rationalize why men buy women in prostitution, qualitative information on the buyers in two studies conducted by the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW)—as well as best practices that address the gender of demand.
Copies of NIKK Magasin can be ordered from 
  • See
See: NIKK Magasin No. 1 – 2002. Copies of NIKK Magasin can be ordered from , .. Box 1156, Blindern, -0317 Oslo, Norway, via email: nikk@nikk.uio.no or downloaded from their website.
Shelter and treatment center for women in prostitution) Director: Dorit Otzen Gasvaerksvej 24
  • Denmark Reden
Denmark Reden (Shelter and treatment center for women in prostitution) Director: Dorit Otzen Gasvaerksvej 24
Internationella Föreningen för Invandrarkvinnor (International organization for migrant women
  • Riffi -Riksförbundet
RIFFI -Riksförbundet Internationella Föreningen för Invandrarkvinnor (International organization for migrant women) Norrtullsgatan 45