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Does Gamification in MOOC Discussion Forums Work?

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Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a new form of learning environment aimed towards accessibility and openness using contemporary technologies. One of the MOOC’s key features is the social interaction which usually takes place in discussion forums. This article focuses on reworking and analyzing the existing iMooX forum by enriching the new design with gamifi-cation elements. The intended objectives aim at refreshing the current style and improving its handling and usability. This article provides our experience of this implementation as well as examining whether or not the gamification ele-ments can help increase the participation rate and the teacher-to-student and student-to-student communication exchange. Results of the new design showed a good user satisfaction and a slight positive impact.
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... It also evaluated gamification effects on several factors like engagement, motivation, participation rate, homework performance, and students' interaction patterns and satisfaction. [5], [6], [7], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21], [22], [23]. Understanding student bevaviour [4], [11], [21], [24], [25]. ...
... Some studies developed tools or adopted open source plugins for LA. For example, [10] developed an algorithm for badges calculation as indicators, and [18], [22] offered a complete logging system for all MOOC variables in iMooX through (iLAP) tool to categorize students according to their activities. ...
Conference Paper
The growing adoption of learning analytics (LA) approaches and data mining (DM) techniques using educational gamification data sets is reflected in increased publications on this topic. However, with different gamified contexts and a variety of LA methods available, no comprehensive review summarized the obtained findings. Therefore, this research aims to identify studies' characteristics, objectives, and methods used in gamification learning analytics (GaLA) research. To identify these, this study comprehensively reviewed the literature of 24 studies selected from an initial pool of 221 search results. The findings show that GaLA methods can be categorized into: visualization, data mining, social network analysis (SNA), statistics, and correlations. In conclusion, GaLA is defined as a data-driven approach using various methods of data analysis and mining techniques in gamified contexts for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data to assess or enhance the gameful experience, understand student behaviour, and improve learning outcomes.
... Perceiving the presence of others online is not an inherent characteristic of MOOC platforms, where usually the only 'social' feature, the only 'social affordance 1 ', available is the discussion forum [4]. Several studies have investigated how forums should be designed to foster user engagement [4,5], but only few have considered to include and design solutions, for generating a SoC among MOOC users in order to raise engagement levels [6]. ...
Chapter
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Over the past few years, massive online open courses (MOOCs) have been increasingly identified as technologies that could transform education, by providing free and high-quality content to anyone with an Internet connection. However, despite these potentials, MOOCs generally fail to keep their participants on board. One of the reasons for this phenomenon can lie in a lack of participants’ engagement. Social presence and sense of community (SoC) theories claim that a user in an online shared environment may feel more engaged if s/he perceives the others as ‘real persons’ and feels part of a community. Therefore, we developed our game elements with the purpose of developing social presence and SoC among MOOC users. The results of our experiment, from one side, show that our gamification design did positively impact users’ development of social presence and SoC, as well as their learning performance. From the other, data did not confirm that higher levels of social presence and SoC corresponded to higher engagement of MOOC users. These results have important implications for the field by enriching it with a more technologically enhanced approach towards implementing gamification, and by augmenting the social potentials of MOOCs.
... Badges were awarded for students' basic actions such as creating an account, receiving "likes" or marking forum threads as favorite. Although the results showed a high level of user satisfaction, the reading and writing levels in the discussion forums decreased in comparison with the previous non-gamified version of the same course [49]. ...
Article
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Chapter
The use of gamification has shown to be an interesting approach to engage users in MOOCs. In this context, different game strategies, elements, and mechanics are applied to help to improve the teaching/learning process. When designing teaching/learning methods, teachers must take into account both gamification techniques and learning styles in order to encourage students and to improve their learning performance, respectively. However, while applying gamification and at the same time keep taking into account the corresponding learning styles, we may find some kinds of incompatibilities. Thus, what this chapter covers is the conducted experimental analysis aimed at exploring the viability of merging gamer's profiles and learning styles in a single multidimensional user profile. The obtained results expose that, with this approach, we are able to identify groups of students so that, while designing teaching/learning methods, we can take into account both learning styles to improve the learning performance and gamification techniques to motivate and encourage the student.
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Christian T. Toth untersucht den Einfluss von Persönlichkeitsfaktoren und dem Prokrastinationsverhalten von Teilnehmern und Teilnehmerinnen in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Der Autor bettet die Forschungsergebnisse in eine Rezeption und Systematisierung der internationalen MOOC-Forschung ein und diskutiert sie hinsichtlich ihrer Bedeutsamkeit für die (Weiter-)Entwicklung. Schließlich werden die Ergebnisse, auch bezogen auf den digital divide, aus einer gesellschaftsanalytischen Perspektive gedeutet. Die Basis der vorliegenden Forschung sind die in Kooperation mit dem MOOC-Provider ‚Iversity‘ erhobenen Daten aus vier internationalen MOOCs. Der Inhalt • Forschungsüberblick zu Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) • Die Bedeutung der Persönlichkeit und der Prokrastination im E-Learning • Quantitative Analysen von vier internationalen MOOCs • Kritische Analyse im Zusammenhang mit der digitalen Spaltung Die Zielgruppen • Dozierende und Studierende der Erziehungs-, Bildungs- und Sozialwissenschaften • Praktiker und Praktikerinnen im Bereich des E-Learning, der Medien- und Erwachsenenbildung und der außerberuflichen Weiterbildung Der Autor Christian T. Toth ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Erziehungswissenschaft der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität in Mainz und forscht an der Schnittstelle von Allgemeiner Pädagogik und Medienpädagogik mit Schwerpunkten in der Persönlichkeits- und Bildungsforschung.
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E-Learning (von electronic learning) ist “ein vielgestaltiges gegenständliches und organisatorisches Arrangement von elektronischen bzw. digitalen Medien zum Lernen, virtuellen Lernräumen und ‘Blended Learning’” . E-Learning ist deshalb ein sehr weitgefasster und zunehmend unpräziser Begriff, denn das Spektrum des E-Learning reicht von den ersten Ansätzen des ‘Computer Based Training’ aus den 1980er Jahren bis hin zu rein digitalen Lernumgebungen wie bei MOOCs.
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Incl. bibl., index, URL adresses
Learning about Social Learning in MOOCs: From Statistical Analysis to Generative Model
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Gunawardhana, P. & Palaniappan, S.: Gamification. Vol. 3. Journal of Advanced and Applied Sciences (JAAS), Issue 02, 51-58 (2005): AROPUB.