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Variabilité de la zone de minimum d'oxygène du Pacifique Est équatorial au cours du Quaternaire récent

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Cette thèse a pour objectif de documenter les variations spatiotemporelles de la zone de minimum d’oxygène (OMZ) du Pacifique Nord-Est, et d’identifier les mécanismes qui ont causé ces variations. L’étude est fondée sur l’analyse géochimique des composants majeurs, mineurs et traces de sédiments prélevés dans le Pacifique Nord-Est, en combinant des mesures par ICP-MS et scanneur XRF. Ces mesures ont permis de distinguer l’effet de la productivité biologique de celui de la ventilation océanique sur l’oxygénation du sédiment.J’ai pu mettre en évidence le rôle prépondérant de la productivité au niveau de la Basse Californie (23°N), qui varie en phase avec les températures en Atlantique Nord durant les 120.000 dernières années. Par ailleurs, la ventilation océanique a probablement joué un rôle important au niveau du golfe de Papagayo (12°N), par l’advection de masses d’eau provenant des hautes latitudes nord et sud. L’intensité de l’OMZ du Pacifique Nord-Est serait donc influencée par des modifications des circulations océaniques et atmosphériques, liées aux climats des hautes latitudes des deux hémisphères.
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