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Abstract

Background Risk factors for teenage pregnancy are linked to many factors, including a family history of teenage pregnancy. This research examines whether a mother’s teenage childbearing or an older sister’s teenage pregnancy more strongly predicts teenage pregnancy in a younger sister. Methods This study used linkable administrative databases housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP). The original cohort consisted of 17,115 women born in Manitoba between April 1, 1979 and March 31, 1994, who stayed in the province until at least their 20th birthday, had at least one older sister, and had no missing values on key variables. Propensity score matching (1:2) was used to create balanced cohorts for two logistic regression models; one examining the impact of an older sister’s teenage pregnancy on a younger sister's teenage pregnancy and the other analyzing the effect of the mother’s teenage childbearing on a younger sister's teenage pregnancy odds.ResultsThe adjusted odds of becoming pregnant between ages 14 and 19 for teens with at least one older sister having a teenage pregnancy were 3.06 (99% CI 2.53 - 3.64) times higher than for women whose older sister(s) did not have a teenage pregnancy. Teenage daughters of mothers who had their first child before age 20 had 1.51 (99% CI 1.29 - 1.78) times higher odds of pregnancy than those whose mothers had their first child after age 19. Educational achievement was adjusted for in a sub-population examining the odds of pregnancy between ages 16 and 19. After this adjustment, the odds of teenage pregnancy for teens with at least one older sister who had a teenage pregnancy were reduced to 2.34 (99% CI 1.92-2.86) and the odds of pregnancy for teen daughters of teenage mothers were reduced to 1.35 (99% CI 1.15-1.59).Conclusion Given that an older sister’s teenage pregnancy has a much stronger impact than a mother’s teenage pregnancy, this study suggests social modeling to be a stronger risk factor for teenage pregnancy than living in an adverse environment created by a mother's adolescent childbearing. This study contributes to understanding of the broader topic “who is influential about what” within the family.
International Journal of Population Data Science (2017) 1:006
International Journal of
Population Data Science
Journal Website: www.ijpds.org
Teenage pregnancy: The impact of maternal adolescent childbearing and older
sister’s teenage
Wall-Wieler, Elizabeth1*, Roos, Leslie1, and Nickel, Nathan1
1Curtin University
Background
Risk factors for teenage pregnancy are linked to many factors,
including a family history of teenage pregnancy. This research
examines whether a mother’s teenage childbearing or an older
sister’s teenage pregnancy more strongly predicts teenage preg-
nancy in a younger sister.
Methods
This study used linkable administrative databases housed at the
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP). The original cohort
consisted of 17,115 women born in Manitoba between April 1,
1979 and March 31, 1994, who stayed in the province until at
least their 20th birthday, had at least one older sister, and had no
missing values on key variables. Propensity score matching (1:2)
was used to create balanced cohorts for two logistic regression
models; one examining the impact of an older sister’s teenage
pregnancy on a younger sister’s teenage pregnancy and the other
analyzing the effect of the mother’s teenage childbearing on a
younger sister’s teenage pregnancy odds.
Results and discussion
The adjusted odds of becoming pregnant between ages 14 and
19 for teens with at least one older sister having a teenage preg-
nancy were 3.06 (99% CI 2.53 - 3.64) times higher than for
women whose older sister(s) did not have a teenage pregnancy.
Teenage daughters of mothers who had their first child before
age 20 had 1.51 (99% CI 1.29 - 1.78) times higher odds of
pregnancy than those whose mothers had their first child after
age 19. Educational achievement was adjusted for in a sub-
population examining the odds of pregnancy between ages 16
and 19. After this adjustment, the odds of teenage pregnancy
for teens with at least one older sister who had a teenage preg-
nancy were reduced to 2.34 (99% CI 1.92-2.86) and the odds of
pregnancy for teen daughters of teenage mothers were reduced
to 1.35 (99% CI 1.15-1.59).
Conclusion
Given that an older sister’s teenage pregnancy has a much
stronger impact than a mother’s teenage pregnancy, this study
suggests social modeling to be a stronger risk factor for teenage
pregnancy than living in an adverse environment created by a
mother’s adolescent childbearing. This study contributes to un-
derstanding of the broader topic “who is influential about what”
within the family.
Corresponding Author:
Email Address: wallwiee@myumanitoba.ca (E. Wall-Wieler)
http://dx.doi.org/10.23889/ijpds.v1i1.20
August 2016 c
The Authors. Open Access under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc- nd/4.0/deed.en)
Article
Purpose U.S. Hispanic adolescents are at risk for negative health outcomes due to risk-taking behaviors involving sex, drugs, and alcohol. Mother-daughter communication can reduce these risk-taking behaviors and reinforce parents' expectations. The purpose of this study was to explore mothers' descriptions of their communication about risk-taking behaviors with their early adolescent Hispanic daughters. Design and methods This qualitative descriptive study involved focus groups with 21 Hispanic mothers of 7th grade (12–14 years old) girls. Conventional content analysis was conducted to identify the strategies they used during these conversations. Results Strategies mothers used included warning, focusing on negative consequences, creating opportunities to express maternal expectations, and stressing the importance of positive influences. Communication was also influenced by daughters' physical development and social media. Conclusions The mothers were concerned about their daughters' exposure to risk-taking behaviors but were unsure about how to talk to their daughters about how to avoid them, particularly regarding topics related to sex. Practice implications Our study results have implications on how to facilitate parent-child conversations about risk-taking behaviors and to equip mothers and parents to teach their children how to avoid engaging in these behaviors.
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