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Injecting reality into the migrant entrepreneurship agenda

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... Such thinking has inspired formation of a body of critical scholarship challenging dominant assumptions and giving voice to alternative subjectivities (Essers, Dey, Tedmanson, & Verduyn, 2017;Deirdre Tedmanson, Verduyn, Essers, & Gartner, 2012). For instance, among other things, these critical scholars have explored ethnic and indigenous entrepreneurship to expose the economic rationality implicit to Western entrepreneurial norms (e.g., Lyne, 2017;Deidre Tedmanson & Evans, 2017), and challenging ideals such as ideas of wholesome entrepreneurs (Williams, 2008;Wright, 2015) and the emancipation of digital entrepreneurialism (Wright, 2015), migrant entrepreneurship (e.g., Jones, Ram, & Villares, 2017) and female entrepreneurship (Alkhaled, Berglund, & Alkhaled-Studholme, 2018), revealing the workings of gender (Bruni, Gherardi, & Poggio, 2004) and power (Kenny & Scriver, 2012;March & Thomas, 2017). ...
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Tourism enterprises play a vital role in tourism development. This has inspired scholarly and policy interest in the workings of tourism enterprises, particularly the small enterprises that account for the majority. The heterogeneity of small enterprises presents challenging terrain for scholars and policymakers concerned to understand and manage enterprise development and tourism development. Scholars have called for more research to deepen understanding of tourism enterprises and tourism development. The question is how to approach this complex terrain in research and practice. Recent lines of research suggest that answers may lay in the vicissitudes of practice. Entrepreneurship scholars have lately started to examine enterprises from the vantage of practice, the research concern shifting to the constructing action of enterprising. This vantage offers much promise to deepen understanding of tourism enterprises and tourism development. However, practice perspectives have rarely been used in studies of tourism enterprises and the link between enterprising practices and tourism development has not yet been made. Drawing inspiration from nascent practice perspectives lately emerging in entrepreneurship and tourism studies, this thesis takes up the practice modality of enterprising to explore the terrain of tourism enterprises and tourism development. Using a multimethod qualitative approach, the thesis tours sites of enterprising action to offer another view of tourism enterprises and tourism development. Visiting the enterprising action of innovating, constructing, performing, intervening, and reflecting, the tour sheds light on the everyday action of enterprising to unfold an image of mundane tourism development. Orienting to the vicissitudes of enterprising practice, this thesis provides another view of tourism enterprises and tourism development, opening new avenues for research and practice. Enterprising carries ontological, epistemological, and methodological implications for research. It urges for post-disciplinary research approaches characterised by theoretical and methodological diversity geared to producing practicable knowledge through close encounters with the vicissitudes of practice. Enterprising and mundane tourism development are travelling concepts with transformative potential – not conceptual destinations, but concepts to inspire further travel.
... Moreover, experts from the civil society initiatives do not appear to actively work on influencing migrants to enter more profitable market sectors, while recognizing that migrants largely operate in low-growth sectors (e.g., services and gastronomy) [102]. This reinforces the premise that self-categorisation in migrant integration could be (implicitly) driven by orientalist ideologies, where migrants from Muslim-majority backgrounds are regarded as inferior to the European, and therefore not expected to achieve success in areas where a European can (see [103]), such as high-growth entrepreneurial venturing. Also, it is an indicator of out-group homogeneity, seeing all (welfare-dependent) migrants as a single group of unlikely victors. ...
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Restricted opportunities for economic advance led to the development of small-scale entrepreneurial activity in the form of shopkeeping. At one extreme, groups such as the Chinese and Jews are identified with commercial success and social mobility, while at the other pole, the under-development of black business is associated with continuing social and economic disadvantage. Paradoxically, the business 'success' of Asians in Britain now has to lie in shielding themselves from economic equality. An economically segregated commercial sector is able to serve a socially segregated population, but this precludes integration or desegregation in either sphere. It is likely, however, that the role of the Asian shopkeeper varies among the different ethnic subgroups. There is, for example, a considerable difference between Punjabi Muslims from Pakistan and Gujerati Hindus from East Africa. The role adopted by Asian shopkeepers in Bradford may have more to do with the Punjabi peasant origin of the bulk of the Asian immigrant population there than with a universal Asian attempt to avoid catering for the native British population. East African Asians in other cities seem economically more integrated into the total market, rather than restricted to the small scale and to their ethnic group. -from Editorsentrepreneurial activity shopkeeping ethnic groups UK