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Tacit Knowledge in Maker Spaces and FAB LABS: From DO IT YOURSELF (DIY) to DO IT With OTHERS (DIWO)

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Abstract

A collaborative space for stimulating creativity is a place of learning through the exchange and sharing of knowledge and experience among its members. It allows to leverage innovation through the use of technological resources available in the space, stimulating the creativity of its participants, enabling the development of products and solutions based on personal projects – Do It Yourself (DIY) - from ideation, or the construction supported on knowledge developed by other elements together, collaboratively, enhancing the final result – Do It With Others (DIWO). A research project is being held to create a new Lab, or transform and adapt one of the existing Lab’s, in a Fab Lab or a Maker Space to let students, teachers and staff give wings to their imagination and develop innovative solutions to solve real problems, while they interact and exchange tacit knowledge, making it explicit after concluding their projects when they share their research reports.

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