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Objective Disseminating high-impact scholarship is a critical task for many social work academics. Although the factors that contribute to this process have been investigated in other disciplines, there is a paucity of equivalent research in social work. This longitudinal study addresses this gap in the literature by examining the effects of coauthorship, database indexing, and article length on subsequent citation counts, a widely used measure of scholarly impact. Based upon the extant research, we hypothesized that all three factors would be associated with a greater number of citations 5 years after publication. Method The sample consisted of 3,066 articles, published inclusively from 2005 to 2009 in 18 disciplinary social work journals. Multilevel negative binomial regression was used to model the effects of each factor on 5-year citation counts. Results The findings generally supported the hypotheses. Articles were more likely to be cited in subsequent scholarship if they were (a) written by 3 or more authors, (b) retrievable from more databases, and (c) longer. Conclusions The results raise the possibility that authors interested in high-impact scholarship might benefit from working in authorship teams to create longer papers containing more original ideas, and then submitting the resulting manuscripts to journals that are indexed in multiple electronic databases.

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... (2) Published in journals identified as part of the social work literature by Perron et al. (2017). Researchers have begun to reference Perron et al. (2017) as embodying the literature base of the social work profession (see Hodge et al., 2017;Krings et al., 2020), and this list was selected to form the basis of the literature search for the current scoping review. However, before searching for these titles in the literature, 10 of the 90 journal titles were removed due to either no longer being in print or indexed with database services. ...
... Aquest resultat no és d'estranyar a l'àmbit de les Ciències Socials, ja que, sovint, aquestes disciplines desenvolupen en major mesura el seu treball en «nínxols especialitzats» vinculats a problemàtiques que presenten un interés més nacional o local, la qual cosa les fa menys proclius a la col·laboració (De Filippo, Marugán, i Sanz-Casado, 2014; Gazni i Didegah, 2011; Leahey i Reikowsky, 2008). D'altra banda, cada vegada més estudis defensen els avantatges d'un major nombre d'autors/es, per exemple, respecte a un major impacte dels treballs (Hodge, Victor, Grogan-Kaylor, i Perron, 2017). No obstant això, en el cas concret de la disciplina de Treball Social no està del tot clara aquesta associació entre un major nombre de signants per treball i un major impacte, tal i com es pot comprovar en els resultats del present estudi bibliomètric de TS Nova. ...
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This paper goes in depth in the study of TS Nova journal that allow to know its dynamics during its 8 years of life. A bibliometric and investigative study of the journal is carried out in aspects related to authorship (gender, training and affiliation), institutions (geographical location, type of institution) and the document itself (co-authorship, citations, publication language). It is obtained that there is a greater percentage of female signatories, mostly social workers, who write mostly about topics related to Social Work and Social Services. The most frequent institutional affiliation is the Academy, being the most common location of the institutions of the Valencian Community. Single author articles were mostly found. The most common language was Spanish and a third of the articles got one or more cites. These results allow us to have a global idea of the journal that offer information for its future.
... The first was to characterize the venues, methodologies, and samples in the social work literature on veterans. Analysis of the literature identified showed that the majority of the peer-reviewed literature on veterans does not appear in what were defined as social work journals (see Hodge, Victor, Grogan-Kaylor, & Perron, 2017). In terms of methodology, half of peer-reviewed items are descriptive or observational. ...
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Objective Social work served U.S. veterans and service members throughout its history as a profession. Social workers continue to support the physical and psychological health of veterans in both the public and private sectors. This scoping review sought to characterize the social work research on practice with veterans. Methods Both academic sources and gray literature were reviewed. Results A total of 536 items were reviewed to determine methodology, sample, social work’s role in the research, content area, and publication type. The largest category of research methodology was descriptive studies (50%). An additional 9% of studies were experimental in nature. Most of the peer-reviewed empirical literature came from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs settings. A slight majority, 58% of peer-reviewed articles, identified a social worker as an author. The most frequently used key words in social work journals reflected mental health (33%), most focused on post-traumatic stress disorder (41%). Conclusions Characterizing the social work literature continues to be a challenge. Social workers practice in a variety of arenas with veterans and should be afforded opportunities to engage in research especially endeavors that focus on marginalized populations of veterans.
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Approximately 65 million children in mainland China are left behind in rural areas while their parents work in the cities. Research has highlighted their health needs. However, current research on interventions for this population is unknown. The purpose of this study was to systematically review existing health service interventions for left-behind children in China. The study team identified interventions for left-behind children by conducting a comprehensive search of major academic databases for Chinese and English research. Articles were retained in the study if they were original empirical intervention studies that target health and related well-being outcomes of left-behind children. A total of 18 unique studies met inclusion criteria. The majority of them demonstrated positive outcomes using various modalities, including education, sport and nutrition guidance, and nursing services. However, the shortcomings in research design and intervention limit their replication. Intervention research for left- behind children shows an enormous gap in the knowledge about this at-risk group. Of the existing programs identified, we observe considerable promise for interventions based on inter-disciplinary approaches to services. We provide additional recommendations for conducting future research and for building collaborative relationships with social workers to better serve the needs of children.
Article
Citation count is a widely used bibliometric indicator. It is influenced by many factors, some of which have been well investigated. This study investigated a more controversial relationship between paper length and citations. After systematic retrieval and selection of literature, we performed a random effects meta-analysis in which 24 effect sizes in 18 original studies were synthesized. The dataset included 1,548,088 papers. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were used to identify factors moderating the correlation between paper length and citations. Tests of heterogeneity and publication bias were conducted to guarantee reliability, and statistical analysis via computer simulation was used to interpret the results of the heterogeneity test. We observed a moderate, positive correlation between paper length and citations (r = 0.310) from the dataset, and hence concluded that the longer a paper is, the more citations it receives. Citation windows and the perceived quality of journals were found to exert a moderating influence on the correlation.
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The BibWrangleR package was designed for conducting bibliometric research on scholarly articles. The primary purpose of the package is to take raw text files of bibliometric data obtained from database search aggregators such as ProQuest and transform these files into an analyzable data frame using the R programming language.
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Objective Scientometric studies of social work have stagnated due to problems with the organization and structure of the disciplinary literature. This study utilized data science to produce a set of research tools to overcome these methodological challenges. Method We constructed a comprehensive list of social work journals for a 25-year time period and searched for all available article records using 35 different databases. Customized software was developed to restructure article records into a single analyzable database. We then computed the annual journal growth from the database. Results A population of 90 disciplinary journals was established, and 33,330 article records were retrieved from 80 of these journals. Rapid and consistent growth in the number of social work journals was observed, particularly from 1997 up to 2005. Conclusions The population list of social work journals, database of article records, and customized software builds the foundation for future scientometric studies in social work.
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Objectives To compare the performance of a range of search facilities; and to illustrate the execution of a comprehensive literature search for qualitative evidence in social work. Context Developments in literature search methods and comparisons of search facilities help facilitate access to the best available evidence for social workers. Method The performance of 14 databases and web search engines was appraised, by applying a search formula for articles relating to perpetrators of intimate partner violence and the process of change. Results Seventy-two out of seventy-eight relevant articles were found on just six of the search facilities used. Social Services Abstracts performed the best. Web search engines did not contribute any unique hits. Conclusion The need to use a range of databases was confirmed. Databases have performed inconsistently across case studies to date. New approaches to pilot-testing facilities and search terms proved useful. Accessing qualitative evidence to inform practice must become more straightforward.
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Social work research is currently in the midst of a pervasive and portentous identity conflict that could pose existential problems vis-a-vis its future viability. The Digital Revolution and the Information Age it wrought have contributed significantly to the growth of social work science between 1984 and 2014. A contemporaneous Era of Emulation arose in social work, involving the widespread importation of research and statistical methods of more advanced social and health sciences (along with the researchers themselves in these fields) into schools of social work. Digital Age developments and Emulation Era benefits led to substantially increased production of social work research as compared with the past scientific generation, in the absence of significant growth in the number of social work earned doctorates. Still, much could be done to improve the quality and increase the quantity of social work research. This article presents a host of proposals to improve social work doctoral education, publication practices, research funding and infrastructure, and performance appraisal that could do much to advance the research mission of the profession. Worrisome developments in science generally—the replication crisis, fraud, problematic peer review and predatory publishing—with implications for social work research are also discussed. Current efforts to resolve social work’s identity crisis by defining a science of social work and identifying a set of Grand Challenges for social work research are critiqued.
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The h-index is a relatively new measure of scholarly productivity, and is a simple tabulation of the number of articles (h) a given author has published which have been cited at least h times. For example, a scholar with an h-index of 10 has published ten articles which have been cited in subsequent articles at least ten times. The h-index for all social work and psychology tenured or tenure-track faculty housed in the top-25 American social work programmes as ranked by U.S. News and World Report in 2008 was obtained, permitting an overall comparison of the scholarly influence between members of the two cognate disciplines. This involved 950 social work faculty and 1,080 psychology faculty cited during the 2001–11 time frame. The average h-index for social work and psychology faculty was 6.34 (SD = 5.57) and 11.32 (SD = 8.21), respectively—a difference which was not significantly different. These results are an improvement over prior related research which showed social work faculty to be disadvantaged in terms of scholarly impact. These results are discussed in terms of the higher scholarly standards expected of social work academics in recent years.
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Researchers from diverse disciplines have exam-ined the many factors that contribute to the influence of published research papers. Such influence dynamics are in essence a marketing of science issue. In this paper, we propose that in addition to known established, overt drivers of influ-ence such as journal, article, author, and Matthew effects, a latent factor "citability" influences the eventual impact of a paper. Citability is a mid-range latent variable that captures the changing relationship of an article to a field. Our analysis using a discretized Tobit model with hidden Markov processes suggests that there are two states of citability, and these dynamic states determine eventual influence of a paper. Prior research in marketing has relied on models where the various effects such as author and journal effects are deemed static. Unlike ours, these models fail to capture the continuously evolving impact dynamics of a paper and the differential effect of the various drivers that depend on the latent state a paper is in at any given point of time. Our model also captures the impact of uncitedness, which other models fail to do. Our model is estimated using articles published in seven leading marketing journals during the years 1996–2003. Findings and implications are discussed.
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Background: Biomedical research has grown considerably in the last few decades, and the authorship characteristics of the dental literature as a whole and of its specialty fields has changed significantly. Unfortunately, the bibliometrics of the periodontal literature have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the bibliometrics of periodontal literature, assessing the geographic origin, study design, and topics investigated in periodontal research published from 1995 to 2010. Methods: Articles published in periodontal journals during 1995 to 2010 were retrieved through hand search. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were applied. The following variables were extrapolated from each article: number of authors, study design, topic investigated, financial support, and geographic origin. The general linear model assessed the influence of independent variables on number of authors per article, and χ(2) test assessed the statistical difference of the variables over years 1995 to 2010. Results: A total of 2,260 articles were reviewed; 2,076 met the inclusion criteria. The number of authors per article increased (P <0.001) from 4.0 (1995) to 5.1 (2010). The proportion of articles published from North America and Europe decreased (P <0.001) from 84.3% (1995) to 58.6% (2010), whereas for Asia and South America the article proportion increased (P <0.001) from 13.8% (1995) to 40% (2010). Research targeting prevention and treatment of periodontal disease is decreasing (P <0.001) in favor of implant-related research. Governmental research funding is increasing (P <0.001). Conclusion: Periodontal research significantly changed during the last 15 years.
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Novelty is an essential feature of creative ideas, yet the building blocks of new ideas are often embodied in existing knowledge. From this perspective, balancing atypical knowledge with conventional knowledge may be critical to the link between innovativeness and impact. Our analysis of 17.9 million papers spanning all scientific fields suggests that science follows a nearly universal pattern: The highest-impact science is primarily grounded in exceptionally conventional combinations of prior work yet simultaneously features an intrusion of unusual combinations. Papers of this type were twice as likely to be highly cited works. Novel combinations of prior work are rare, yet teams are 37.7% more likely than solo authors to insert novel combinations into familiar knowledge domains.
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The citation counts are increasingly used to assess the impact on the scientific community of publications produced by a researcher, an institution or a country. There are many institutions that use bibliometric indicators to steer research policy and for hiring or promotion decisions. Given the importance that counting citations has today, the aim of the work presented here is to show how citations are distributed within a scientific area and determine the dependence of the citation count on the article features. All articles referenced in the Web of Science in 2004 for Biology & Biochemistry, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics were considered. We show that the distribution of citations is well represented by a double exponential-Poisson law. There is a dependence of the mean citation rate on the number of co-authors, the number of addresses and the number of references, although this dependence is a little far from the linear behaviour. For the relation between the mean impact and the number of pages the dependence obtained was very low. For Biology & Biochemistry and Chemistry we found a linear behaviour between the mean citation per article and impact factor and for Mathematics and Physics the results obtained are near to the linear behaviour. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Systematic reviews are important for informing clinical practice and health policy. The aim of this study was to examine the bibliometrics of systematic reviews and to determine the amount of variance in citations predicted by the journal impact factor (JIF) alone and combined with several other characteristics. We conducted a bibliometric analysis of 1,261 systematic reviews published in 2008 and the citations to them in the Scopus database from 2008 to June 2012. Potential predictors of the citation impact of the reviews were examined using descriptive, univariate and multiple regression analysis. The mean number of citations per review over four years was 26.5 (SD +/-29.9) or 6.6 citations per review per year. The mean JIF of the journals in which the reviews were published was 4.3 (SD +/-4.2). We found that 17% of the reviews accounted for 50% of the total citations and 1.6% of the reviews were not cited. The number of authors was correlated with the number of citations (r = 0.215, P < 0.001). Higher numbers of citations were associated with the following characteristics: first author from the United States (36.5 citations), an ICD-10 chapter heading of Neoplasms (31.8 citations), type of intervention classified as Investigation, Diagnostics or Screening (34.7 citations) and having an international collaboration (32.1 citations). The JIF alone explained more than half of the variation in citations (R2 = 0.59) in univariate analysis. Adjusting for both JIF and type of intervention increased the R2 value to 0.81. Fourteen percent of reviews published in the top quartile of JIFs (>=5.16) received citations in the bottom quartile (eight or fewer), whereas 9% of reviews published in the lowest JIF quartile (<=2.06) received citations in the top quartile (34 or more). Six percent of reviews in journals with no JIF were also in the first quartile of citations. The JIF predicted over half of the variation in citations to the systematic reviews. However, the distribution of citations was markedly skewed. Some reviews in journals with low JIFs were well-cited and others in higher JIF journals received relatively few citations; hence the JIF did not accurately represent the number of citations to individual systematic reviews.
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Objectives: This article reports the first estimated h-index values for social work faculty. Methods: Multiple raters blindly assessed two samples of faculty (1) tenure-track faculty at institutions listed in the U.S. News and World Report top 10 (n = 337) and (2) tenure-track editorial board members of 5 highly ranked social work journals (n = 215). Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients for h-index values among the multiple raters ranged from .83 to .92, indicating good reliability. For faculty at top 10 institutions, mean estimated h-index values were 3.97 (SD = 2.87) for assistant professors; 8.59 (SD = 3.72) for associate professors; and 16.14 (SD = 8.35) for full professors. Values for editorial board members were generally similar. Conclusions: These are the first such published data; further research is needed.
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This study examines decisions by social work educators about authorship order and educators' views on other authorship issues. Results indicate the writing of the manuscript was viewed as the most important task in making decisions about authorship order. The majority believed that a written agreement is helpful before beginning research to decide authorship order. Gender and prior authorship experience were found to be significantly related to some social work educators' beliefs. © Copyright 2005 Council on Social Work Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In recent decades, co-authorship and policies aimed at inducing academic collaboration have increased simultaneously. Assuming that intellectual collaboration is exogenously determined, prior studies find a negative relationship between co-authorship and productivity. I examine a panel data on economists publishing from 1970 to 1999 to test the causal effect of intellectual collaboration on intellectual output. As characteristics of the individual and her opportunity set are endogenously related to both collaboration and productivity, I instrument the amount of co-authorship by the common research interest between an author and her potential coauthors. After controlling for endogenous co-authorship formation, unobservable heterogeneity and time varying factors, the effect of intellectual collaboration on individual performance becomes positive.
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Factors contributing to citation impact in social-personality psychology were examined in a bibliometric study of articles published in the field’s three major journals. Impact was operationalized as citations accrued over 10 years by 308 articles published in 1996, and predictors were assessed using multiple databases and trained coders. Predictors included author characteristics (i.e., number, gender, nationality, eminence), institutional factors (i.e., university prestige, journal prestige, grant support), features of article organization (i.e., title characteristics, number of studies, figures and tables, number and recency of references), and research approach (i.e., topic area, methodology). Multivariate analyses demonstrated several strong predictors of impact, including first author eminence, having a more senior later author, journal prestige, article length, and number and recency of references. Many other variables — e.g., author gender and nationality, collaboration, university prestige, grant support, title catchiness, number of studies, experimental vs. correlational methodology, topic area — did not predict impact.
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A number of bibliometric studies point out that citation counts are a function of many variables besides scientific quality. In this paper our aim is to investigate these factors that usually impact the number of citation counts, using an extensive data set from the field of chemistry. The data set contains roughly 2000 manuscripts that were submitted to the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition (AC-IE) as short communications, reviewed by external reviewers, and either published in AC-IE or, if not accepted for publication by AC-IE, published elsewhere. As the reviewers’ ratings of the importance of the manuscripts’ results are also available to us, we can examine the extent to which certain factors that previous studies demonstrated to be generally correlated with citation counts increase the impact of papers, controlling for the quality of the manuscripts (as measured by reviewers’ ratings of the importance of the findings) in the statistical analysis. As the results show, besides being associated with quality, citation counts are correlated with the citation performance of the cited references, the language of the publishing journal, the chemical subfield, and the reputation of the authors. In this study no statistically significant correlation was found between citation counts and number of authors.
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Faculty scholarship at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) has in the past served as a blueprint for the Black masses. Even today, HBCU faculty scholarship continues to be an informative source to communicate accurate information regarding marginalized groups. This study examines h-index scores of 65 faculty members at five doctorate-granting schools of social work. The majority of calculated h-index scores were considered to be low in terms of productivity. We make the argument that these scores are not a good measure of productivity because of the problematic nature of their use to evaluate HBCU faculty. Implications for future research, practice, and teaching are presented.
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Objective The objective was to examine reference errors in research articles published in Research on Social Work Practice. High rates of reference errors in other top social work journals have been noted in previous studies. Methods Via a sampling frame of 22,177 total references among 464 research articles published in the previous decade, a sample of 500 references were randomly selected and verified against the original work for accuracy in the following fields: author name(s), publication year, article title, journal title, volume, and page number(s). Results Almost 27% of references contained at least 1 error (0.35 errors per reference); 173 errors in total. The plurality of errors occurred in article titles (13.2%). Two factors significantly related to the likelihood of error: reference age and number of authors. Conclusion Comparison to reference error rates in other social work journals is discussed, as are suggestions to authors, editors, and educators regarding error reduction.
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The importance of collaboration in research is widely accepted, as is the fact that articles with more authors tend to be more cited. Nevertheless, although previous studies have investigated whether the apparent advantage of collaboration varies by country, discipline, and number of co-authors, this study introduces a more fine-grained method to identify differences: the geometric Mean Normalized Citation Score (gMNCS). Based on comparisons between disciplines, years and countries for two million journal articles, the average citation impact of articles increases with the number of authors, even when international collaboration is excluded. This apparent advantage of collaboration varies substantially by discipline and country and changes a little over time. Against the trend, however, in Russia solo articles have more impact. Across the four broad disciplines examined, collaboration had by far the strongest association with impact in the arts and humanities. Although international comparisons are limited by the availability of systematic data for author country affiliations, the new indicator is the most precise yet and can give statistical evidence rather than estimates.
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Objectives We sought the answer to one major research question—Does psychology have a more defined culture of research than social work? Methods Using U.S. News and World Report 2012 and 2013 rankings, we compared psychology faculty ( N = 969) from their 25 top ranked programs with a controlled sample of social work faculty ( N = 970) in their respectively ranked programs. We conducted analyses and between- and within-group comparisons across each academic rank, namely assistant, associate, and full professor. Three metrics used in these analyses were the h-index, the age-weighted citation rate (AWCR), and the per-author AWCRpA developed by Harzing. This study represents the first of its kind within the social sciences to utilize the latter two metrics, which discern one’s lifetime scholarship impact, controlling for both seniority and age. Results Psychology faculty statistically outperformed social work faculty in every comparative category tested using all three metrics. These included both between each respective discipline and between each rank within each discipline. Particularly surprising was the predominance of the full professors in psychology performance over their social work counterparts. Conclusions We make an empirical case offering the working hypothesis that a culture of research is embedded in psychology as a profession and academic discipline, and such a culture does not exist in social work. We hypothesize that a main element in developing any profession’s scholarship capacity includes ongoing comprehensive research mentorship—a factor not readily apparent in social work academic units.
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Many studies have found that co-authored research is more highly cited than single author research. This finding is policy relevant as it indicates that encouraging co-authored research will tend to maximise citation impact. Nevertheless, whilst the citation impact of research increase as the number of authors increases in the sciences, the extent to which this occurs in the social sciences is unknown. In response, this study investigates the average citation level of articles with one to four authors published in 1995, 1998, 2001, 2004 and 2007 in 19 social science disciplines. The results suggest that whilst having at least two authors gives a substantial citation impact advantage in all social science disciplines, additional authors are beneficial in some disciplines but not in others.
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This article examines whether authorship credits on publications in 8 peer-reviewed social work journals changed significantly from 2001 to 2011 by analyzing the mean number of authors. Results indicate statistically significant increases in 5 of the 8 journals and in the mean number of authors across the 8 journals when combined. Although sole authorship was the norm in 2001, by 2011 the majority of articles were co-authored. Possible explanations for the observed changes in the rates of collaboration and some consequences for social work scholarship are reviewed. Implications for social work education and scholarship are discussed.
Article
Purpose Following up an Research on Social Work Practice article published a decade ago, this study aimed to examine reference error rates among five, widely circulated social work journals. Methods A stratified random sample of references was selected from the year 2013 ( N = 500, 100/journal). Each was verified against the original work to detect errors among author name(s), publication year, article title, journal title, volume number, and page numbers. Interrater consistency was 0.88. Results In the sample, 163 (33%) references contained at least 1 error, producing 258 total errors. Author names held the highest error rate (0.26) and the volume number held the lowest (0.04). The highest error rate was found in Social Service Review (0.48), statistically significantly higher than the remaining journals. Discussion Reference accuracy in social work journal articles has increased marginally. Substantial reference errors in articles among widely circulated journals may portray an aggregate lack of polished, scholarly writing/editing skills within the profession.
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This article is motivated by two related research questions about research activity in the Operations Research/Management Science/Operations Management (OR/MS/OM) and Finance disciplines. First, we investigate the influence of co-authorship on article impact in OR/MS/OM. Second, we develop a number of citation metrics to explore the nature of scholarly exchange between top OR/MS/OM and Finance journals. We work with a large sample of articles published across 2001-2008 for twenty OR/MS/OM journals and nineteen Finance journals, with corresponding citations up to and including year 2012. Key findings from the first research question indicate a higher impact for articles with multiple authors, but with the marginal gain brought by an additional author being insignificant for articles with three or more authors. For the second research question, we find that the Finance discipline borrows less from OR/MS/OM than vice versa, which highlights the potential for wider collaboration among researchers—particularly for Finance academics in exploring how various OR/MS/OM techniques can be adopted or adapted into their research. Finally, we discover that the ranking of OR/MS/OM journals is determined more by the extent that they are cited in other disciplines, but observe a gradual rise in self-perpetuating behavior in the OR/MS/OM discipline.
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This study examines whether there are some general trends across subject fields regarding the factors affecting the number of citations of articles, focusing especially on those factors that are not directly related to the quality or content of articles (extrinsic factors). For this purpose, from 6 selected subject fields (condensed matter physics, inorganic and nuclear chemistry, electric and electronic engineering, biochemistry and molecular biology, physiology, and gastroenterology), original articles published in the same year were sampled (n = 230–240 for each field). Then, the citation counts received by the articles in relatively long citation windows (6 and 11 years after publication) were predicted by negative binomial multiple regression (NBMR) analysis for each field. Various article features about author collaboration, cited references, visibility, authors' achievements (measured by past publications and citedness), and publishing journals were considered as the explanatory variables of NBMR. Some generality across the fields was found with regard to the selected predicting factors and the degree of significance of these predictors. The Price index was the strongest predictor of citations, and number of references was the next. The effects of number of authors and authors' achievement measures were rather weak.
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Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and PsycINFO, the comparison database. Results: Both databases provided less than optimal coverage of social work journals, and SWA performed significantly worse than did PsycINFO. Both databases provided better coverage of National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Press journals than non—NASW Press journals. Conclusion: The results provide evidence of substantial deficits in SWA that merit serious concern.
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This exploratory study investigated the rate of citation errors in the reference lists of five social work journals. High error rates have been found in journals in fields such as medicine and psychology but have not yet been investigated in social work journals. A stratified, computer-generated random sample was selected (N = 500, 100 per journal), and each reference was verified against the original work for accuracy in six fields: article title, author name(s), journal title, pagination, volume, and year. In examining the total sample of 500 references across the five journals, 206 references (41.2%) contained at least one error. Suggestions for reduction of error rates are discussed, as are suggestions for future study in this area.
Article
This study assesses whether eleven factors associate with higher impact research: individual, institutional and international collaboration; journal and reference impacts; abstract readability; reference and keyword totals; paper, abstract and title lengths. Authors may have some control over these factors and hence this information may help them to conduct and publish higher impact research. These factors have been previously researched but with partially conflicting findings. A simultaneous assessment of these eleven factors for Biology and Biochemistry, Chemistry and Social Sciences used a single negative binomial-logit hurdle model estimating the percentage change in the mean citation counts per unit of increase or decrease in the predictor variables. The journal Impact Factor was found to significantly associate with increased citations in all three areas. The impact and the number of cited references and their average citation impact also significantly associate with higher article citation impact. Individual and international teamwork give a citation advantage in Biology and Biochemistry and Chemistry but inter-institutional teamwork is not important in any of the three subject areas. Abstract readability is also not significant or of no practical significance. Among the article size features, abstract length significantly associates with increased citations but the number of keywords, title length and paper length are insignificant or of no practical significance. In summary, at least some aspects of collaboration, journal and document properties significantly associate with higher citations. The results provide new and particularly strong statistical evidence that the authors should consider publishing in high impact journals, ensure that they do not omit relevant references, engage in the widest possible team working, when appropriate, and write extensive abstracts. A new finding is that whilst is seems to be useful to collaborate and to collaborate internationally, there seems to be no particular need to collaborate with other institutions within the same country.
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A candidate's publication record is an increasingly important criterion for awarding tenure in schools of social work. Yet suitable parameters have not been established in schools of social work for differentiating between the various forms of scholarly publication. This exploratory study shows that the following types of scholarly publication are most desirable for obtaining tenure: (1) work printed in peer-reviewed publications; (2) publications that focus on social work rather than non—social work scholarship; (3) single authorship or lead authorship of collaborative work; (4) articles in first-tier journals or other national and international publishing outlets.
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Research about the relative importance of faculty performance of teaching, scholarship, and service work roles in tenure and promotion decisions is reviewed and updated. Data collected from 130 deans or directors through Internet administration of the Work Role Salience Index (Green & Baskind, 2007) suggested some variation in the weighting of tenure and promotion decisions among different programs and among different types of programs. However, scholarship was salient at a majority of institutions; teaching and service roles have become less influential over time. Conflict between these findings and findings about workload time allocated to scholarship, teaching, and service are identified and implications discussed.
Article
Objective: Bibliometrics is a method of examining scholarly communications. Concerns regarding the use of bibliometrics in general, and the impact factor score (IFS) in particular, have been discussed across disciplines including social work. Although there are frequent mentions in the literature of the IFS as an indicator of the impact or quality of scholars' work, little empirical work has been published regarding the validity of such use. Method: A proportionate, stratified, random sample, of n=323 articles was selected from 17 Web of Science listed social work journals published during the 1992 to 1994 period. Results: The relationship between journals'IFSs and the actual impact of articles published in those journals (predictive validity) was r= .41 (short term) and r = .42 (long term).Conclusion: The practice of using the IFS as a proxy indicator of article impact merits significant concern as well as further empirical investigation.
Article
Objective: The comprehensiveness of Social Work Abstracts (SWA) as a database was examined. Method: The coverage of articles of Research on Social Work Practice and Social Work Research in SWA from 1995 to 2005 was examined. SWA was compared with other databases on several dimensions. A case study based on the author's publications was conducted. Results: Not all articles published in these two journals were indexed in SWA. The number of social-work-related articles in SWA was lower than those in other databases. Articles relevant to social work and the allied helping professions were omitted in SWA. Conclusions: The comprehensiveness of journal articles indexed in SWA was not high.
Article
Objective: According to a prior study, there are substantial lapses in journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. The current study provides a replication and extension. Method: The longitudinal pattern of coverage of thirty-three journals categorized in SWA as core journals (published in the 1989-1996 period) is examined. Results: The proportion of issues missing from SWA is significantly greater than 0, increase over time, and is significantly biased in favor of NASW journals. Conclusion: The errors in SWA reported here, combined with those previously reported, will exert a long-term negative impact on scholarship unless their existence becomes known to all SWA users and they take steps to compensate for the situation.
Article
This article provides a comparative analysis of publication trends in social work in the US and Great Britain. This exploratory effort seeks to identify possible explanations for the phenomenon of multiple authorship, the implications of multi-authored scholarship, and some of the potential ethical questions that may arise from such collaborations in regard to what constitutes legitimate contributions to a scholarly article or book. To the extent that common trends are emerging across international boundaries, the incentive for heightened communication and collaboration may be increased in an effort to identify implications and derive solutions to common problems.
Article
This study compared Social Work Abstracts and Social Services Abstracts databases in terms of indexing, journal coverage, and searches. The authors interviewed editors, analyzed journal coverage, and compared searches. It was determined that the databases complement one another more than compete. The authors conclude with some considerations.
Article
Three developmental contexts—school, neighborhood, and family—influence school outcomes. The focus of the current investigation was on the promotive role of 4 family factors—family satisfaction, family support, family integration, and home academic culture—on 3 school outcomes. These outcomes included student self-reported sense of school coherence, avoidance of problem behavior, and academic performance. Utilizing a hierarchical linear modeling strategy and a national probability sample, the family protective factors of interest displayed a significant but differential pattern of impact on the 3 school outcomes studied. Findings related to neighborhood and school factors, as well as race/ethnicity, are also reported and discussed. The implications of these findings with respect to practice and policy are addressed.
Article
To determine influences on the production of a scientific article, the content of the article must be studied. We examined articles in biogeography and found that most of the influence is not cited, specific types of articles that are influential are cited while other types of that also are influential are not cited, and work that is “uncited” and “seldom cited” is used extensively. As a result, evaluative citation analysis should take uncited work into account.
Article
Characteristics of highly and poorly cited research articles (with Abstracts) published in The Lancet over a three-year period were examined. These characteristics included numerical (numbers of authors, references, citations, Abstract words, journal pages), organizational (first author country, institution type, institution name), and medical (medical condition, study approach, study type, sample size, study outcome). Compared to the least cited articles, the most cited have three to five times the median number of authors per article, fifty to six hundred percent greater median number of references per article, 110 to 490 times the median number of citations per article, 2.5 to almost seven times the median number of Abstract words per article, and 2.5 to 3.5 times the median number of pages per article. The most cited articles’ medical themes emphasize breast cancer, diabetes, coronary circulation, and HIV immune system problems, focusing on large-scale clinical trials of drugs. The least cited articles’ themes essentially do not address the above medical issues, especially from a clinical trials perspective, cover a much broader range of topics, and have much more emphasis on social and reproductive health issues. Finally, for sample sizes of clinical trials specifically, those of the most cited articles ranged from a median of about 1500 to 2500, whereas those of the least cited articles ranged from 30 to 40.
Article
Hirsch's h index is becoming the standard measure of an individual's research accomplishments. The aggregation of individuals' measures is also the basis for global measures at institutional or national levels. To investigate whether the h index can be reliably computed through alternative sources of citation records, the Web of Science (WoS), PsycINFO and Google Scholar (GS) were used to collect citation records for known publications of four Spanish psychologists. Compared with WoS, PsycINFO included a larger percentage of publication records, whereas GS outperformed WoS and PsycINFO in this respect. Compared with WoS, PsycINFO retrieved a larger number of citations in unique areas of psychology, but it retrieved a smaller number of citations in areas that are close to statistics or the neurosciences, whereas GS retrieved the largest numbers of citations in all cases. Incorrect citations were scarce in Wos (0.3%), more prevalent in PsycINFO (1.1%), and overwhelming in GS (16.5%). All platforms retrieved unique citations, the largest set coming from GS. WoS and PsycINFO cover distinct areas of psychology unevenly, thus applying different penalties on the h index of researches working in different fields. Obtaining fair and accurate h indices required the union of citations retrieved by all three platforms.
Article
We examine the determinants of five year citations to papers published in the American Economic Review and the Economic Journal. Citations are positively related to page length and position in the journal. Both of these variables are consistent with the hypothesis that citations reflect paper quality, as is the number of subsequent self-citations. However, the publication of a major paper, as judged by subsequent citations, significantly increases the citations of other papers in an issue and this indicates the importance of chance in determining citations.
Article
This study aims to investigate the influence of different patterns of collaboration on the citation impact of Harvard University’s publications. Those documents published by researchers affiliated with Harvard University in WoS from 2000–2009, constituted the population of the research which was counted for 124,937 records. Based on the results, only 12% of Harvard publications were single author publications. Different patterns of collaboration were investigated in different subject fields. In all 22 examined fields, the number of co-authored publications is much higher than single author publications. In fact, more than 60% of all publications in each field are multi-author publications. Also, the normalized citation per paper for co-authored publications is higher than that of single author publications in all fields. In addition, the largest number of publications in all 22 fields were also published through inter-institutional collaboration and were as a result of collaboration among domestic researchers and not international ones. In general, the results of the study showed that there was a significant positive correlation between the number of authors and the number of citations in Harvard publications. In addition, publications with more number of institutions have received more number of citations, whereas publications with more number of foreign collaborators were not much highly cited.
Article
We study how scholar collaboration varies across disciplines in science, social science, arts and humanities and the effects of author collaboration on impact and quality of co-authored papers. Impact is measured with the aid of citations collected by papers, while quality is determined by the judgements expressed by peer reviewers. To this end, we take advantage of the dataset provided by the first-ever national research assessment exercise of Italian universities, which involved 20 disciplinary areas, 102 research structures, 18,500 research products, and 6661 peer reviewers. Collaboration intensity neatly varies across disciplines: it is inescapable is most sciences and negligible in most humanities. We measured a general positive association between cardinality of the author set of a paper and citation count as well as peer quality of the contribution. The correlation is stronger when the affiliations of authors are heterogeneous. There exist, however, notable and interesting counter-examples.
Article
Evaluating scientific quality is a notoriously difficult problem which has no standard solution. Ideally, published scientific results should be scrutinised by true experts in the field and given scores for quality and quantity according to established rules. In practice, however, what is called peer review is usually performed by committees with general competence rather than with the specialist's insight that is needed to assess primary research data. Committees tend, therefore, to resort to secondary criteria like crude publication counts, journal prestige, the reputation of authors and institutions, and estimated importance and relevance of the research field,1 making peer review as much of a lottery as of a rational process.2 3 On this background, it is hardly surprising that alternative methods for evaluating research are being sought, such as citation rates and journal impact factors, which seem to be quantitative and objective indicators directly related to published science. The citation data are obtained from a database produced by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) in Philadelphia, which continuously records scientific citations as represented by the reference lists of articles from a large number of the world's scientific journals. The references are rearranged in the database to show how many times each publication has been cited within a certain period, and by whom, and the results are published as the Science Citation Index (SCI) . On the basis of the Science Citation Index and authors' publication lists, the annual citation rate of papers by a scientific author or research group can thus be calculated. Similarly, the citation rate of a scientific journal—known as the journal impact factor—can be calculated as the mean citation rate of all the articles contained in the journal.4 Journal impact factors, which are published annually in SCI Journal Citation Reports , are widely regarded as …
Bibliometrics in social work
  • G Holden
  • G Rosenberg
  • K Barker
Holden, G., Rosenberg, G., & Barker, K. (Eds). (2005). Bibliometrics in social work. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press.